Media Adaptations to Consider: “Deadly Class”

PLEASE NOTE: The following a few spoilers from this series. You have been warned.

Television has joined movies with the many media adaptations of books of numerous genres. TV has turned popular graphic novels, YA, contemporary and classic books into a format worth watching. Game of Thrones has been successful for HBO, The Walking Dead and Preacher have been popular on AMC, and the CW has adapted many of the D.C. Comics into 1-hour episodes: Arrow, The Flash, Legends of Tomorrow, Supergirl, etc. The SyFy Network has done the same thing with The Magiciansand Nightflyers. Now, that channel has decided to adapt, Deadly Class, a graphic novel series by Rick Remender and Wes Craig.

            2018’s San Diego Comic Con premiered the trailer for Deadly Class. Upon learning this news, I wasn’t at SDCC, I was both shocked and excited. I was excited to see one of my favorite graphic novel series make the transition to TV. Yet, Deadly Classis not a “positive” homage to the 1980s like Stranger Things. As both the title, and the cover of the graphic novel suggests, this is a dark and gritty story that takes place during the forgotten reality of America’s recent history.

            Pop culture has people remembering the 1980s with Michael Jackson’s music, John Hughes’ movies, video and arcade games, and MTV. However, history points out that the 1980s had Americans dealing with the Drug War, the long-term effects of the end of the Vietnam War, the end of the Cold War, the rise of the AIDS Epidemic, Reaganomics, and the Reagan Administration. The last one is emphasized in this series as a cautionary tale of how funding cuts hurts more people than help them. Thus, we get the story for Deadly Class.

            Marcus Lopez Arguello, played by Benjamin Wadsworth, is a homeless orphan who is suicidal. Traumatized by both his parents’ deaths and his foster care experience, Marcus holds his rage inside until it bursts into flames, literally. Afterwards, Marcus finds himself on the radar of both the police and the headmaster of an elite school. Obviously, Marcus chooses the latter and becomes a student at the Kings Dominion School of the Deadly Arts. There, Marcus must learn to survive his classes and his classmates. And, Marcus gets regular assignments such as reading The Anarchist Cookbookand killing people. 

            The Pilot of Deadly Class has been on the SyFy website for a few weeks, but it officially premiered on January 16th. Judging from the Pilot, the TV show is a direct and excellent adaptation of the series. The tone and the characters are aligned with the presentation found in both media formats. However, it needs to be said that both the graphic novel and the TV show presents the darker side of humanity through angry, but privileged adolescents. I read the first 4 volumes, back when they were released, which covers the first arc of the story, and the only “spoiler” I can give is: DON’T GET TOO ATTACHED TO THE CHARACTERS! Deadly Class is a story about students who are learning to become assassins. Not all assassins live to an “old” age, so what makes you believe all of the ones in training will survive to graduation?

            The Russo Brothers are the producers of Deadly Class, and with the work they’ve done within the Marvel Cinematic Universe, I’m not worried about the adaptation faltering. In fact, I expect the characters to become more rounded than in the graphic novels. The casting met my expectations—Benedict Wong and Henry Rollins—and it looks like the first season will spend a lot of time exploring the backgrounds and the circumstances of all the characters, and how they grow into the roles placed on them. This TV show looks very promising, and I know I won’t be disappointed. So, if you’re looking for a TV show with a realistic storyline, with the violence of Game of Thronesand Romein a high school setting similar to The Magiciansand Battle Royale, then Deadly Classis for you!

            I will be writing weekly reviews of each episode for the first season of Deadly Class, but I’ll only do video reviews for both the season premiere and the season finale. This way, I can give my feelings on both the shows’ growth and whether or not it remains faithful to the books. That being said, I’ll continue to re-read the first arc of Deadly Class, and I hope you enjoy the series as much as I do. 

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Why You Need to Read: “The Winter of the Witch”

Winternight Trilogy: Book 3: The Winter of the Witch

By: Katherine Arden

Published: January 9, 2019

Genre: Fantasy, Historical Fiction, Fairy Tale Retelling, Folklore, Magic Realism

PLEASE NOTE: The following contains minor spoilers from this novel and the series. You have been warned.

            “You are a fool, man of God,” he said. You never understood.”

            Konstantin said, “I never understood what?”

            “That I do keep faith, in my own fashion,” said the Bear.

(Chapter 23: “Faith and Fear”)

            The Winter of the Witchis the third and final book in Katherine Arden’s Winternight Trilogy.What started with The Bear and the Nightingale—and yes, readers need to read that book and the second book, The Girl in the Tower,in order to know what is going on in the third book—ends with this beautiful end to a beautiful trilogy. This historical fiction fantasy starts where the second book ended, with Moscow recovering from both a fire and the actions of a wicked magician. Once again, Vasilisa Petrovna’s actions have caught up with her, and she barely escapes with her life. Then, she must come up with a plan to unite ALL of Russia—humans and chyerti—to fight against the invading Tatars, and to find balance between two belief systems—Christianity and Paganism.

            The characters are those we were introduced to from the previous books: Vasya, Sasha (her brother), Olga (her sister), Marya (her niece), Solovey (her stallion), Dmitrii Ivanovich (the Grand Prince), Morozko (the frost-demon), Medved (the chaos-spirit), Konstantin Nikonovich (the charlatan priest), and Varvara (the Head servant). New characters are introduced and mentioned as well. Together, all of the characters are active in Arden’s story from the roles they play to the answers they provide to the readers’—and characters’—concerns and questions. Each character is well developed and motivated to accomplish their goals. The conviction in the protagonist, the antagonist(s), and the other characters remind the reader(s) that more scenarios are happening than the characters and we are aware of.

            The plot, as I mentioned earlier, is both a continuation of the events in the previous book, and a continuation of Vasya’s growth into an adult. Christianity is now the dominant religion in Russia with the amount of people who keep the older traditions decreasing, the Tatars continue their campaign to take over Russia, ancient feuds continue to play on, and Vasya is a step closer to coming into her own and accepting her destiny. These subplots are part of the main plot—Russia is changing, but not all things fade away with those changes—and they cannot wait to be dealt with. Each change, along with its dilemma, is addressed again and again until the story’s end. It should be mentioned that each conflict does not get resolved and that is due to the reality found within the story. Conflict—from a minor issue to total chaos—never goes away. The three conflicts found within the plot are resolved, so that story ends, but the lives of the characters leaves for an ambiguous continuation and hope for both the surviving characters, and for the reader(s). 

            The narrative switches between the points-of-view of several characters: Vasya, Sasha, Olga, Konstantin Nikonovich, the Bear, Varvara, etc. Just like in other stories with multiple POVs, readers learn everything that is happening everywhere concurrently. The aftermath of Vasya’s actions affect her throughout the story; Sasha and Olga come to terms with their family’s history, gifts, and future; Konstantin Nikonovich achieves his goals with a bittersweet feeling to his conscience; and, the Bear, the Winter King, and Varvara have their roles to play in the war. Then, there is the other war that’s coming for all denizens of Russia. If it’s not one problem, then it is another problem. Remember, the first war for power happened in The Girl in the Tower,which was a short time ago within the narrative. Arden presents the conflicts and then shows how all of her characters deal with them within the story. Since the narrative is given from multiple viewpoints without the other characters knowing what is happening to other characters, readers know that each narrative is reliable and realistic. The resolution does not give the characters enough knowledge of what happened to the other characters as well, and that provides a believable ending. 

            The style of writing the author uses in this book is the same as it was in the previous books in the series. Magic realism is a genre of writing that is often used alongside the historical fiction genre. The difference is that folklore drives the narrative of a magic realism story. Arden’s style follows this method of writing. The aspect that makes Arden’s trilogy standout is the knowledge of the lore the denizens in the story have, because the lore remains as the world changes. Devout Christians are able to see the chyerti, and there are people who practice both “faiths.” One of the best things about the author’s trilogy is the way she reminds readers that old magic and ancient tales will always remain with the people (hence, the term “folklore”). Everyone knows them, some are aware of them, and few have the ability to use the deeper magic. Folklore is part of a culture, and Arden incorporated the importance of a country unifying, not just for its survival, but also for its way of life through their culture. The author did a beautiful job expressing this within her writing. 

            The appeal surrounding this novel is interesting. I’ve started reading the Winternight Trilogy from the release of The Bear and the Nightingalein 2017 and I knew Katherine Arden was one of my new favorite authors. I received an ARC of The Winter of the Witch, and while I was reading and gushing through it, I found that other readers picked up the first book out of curiosity and enjoyed it, too! If The Bear and the Nightingalewas the first book that introduced us to Katherine Arden, then The Winter of the Witchis the book that cements her as one of the best speculative fiction authors in this era of publication. Katherine Arden takes folklore and reshapes it into a new story to be read and enjoyed the same way Neil Gaiman, Nnedi Okorafor and Naomi Novik have done within their books. The Winternight Trilogyproves that the speculative fiction canon has room for authors who write across multiple elements within the genre like Katherine Arden.  

            I am proud to say that I’ve read Katherine Arden’s books since the publication of her first novel, and I’ve enjoyed them all! Now, while this review is about the last book in the trilogy, I still have to mention all of the books in the trilogy. There are many trilogies in the speculative fiction genre; and, when it comes to the trilogies I’ve read from that genre, the Winternight Trilogyleaves me with the same level of satisfaction as His Dark Materials(by Philip Pullman) and The Broken Earth (by N.K. Jemisin) trilogies. Anyone who knows about how I feel about those trilogies, know that’s a big deal! Reading Vasya’s journey from childhood to adolescence to adulthood was an absolute joy and I’m glad Katherine Arden shared her story with us. I recommend this novel, and the series, to all readers of the speculative fiction genre. None of you will be disappointed.

My Rating:  MUST Read It Now!


My Plans for 2019

            2018 has been a reflective year for me because I was able to prove my resilience through my writings and my other creative projects. However, I realized that when it came to the literary market, I had a lot of reading to catch up on. Blogging about the books I enjoyed reading and sharing pictures of the literary events I attended have been a great experience, and I plan on continuing to do both in 2019. This means I’ll be doing more reading, posting, and sharing of the books I read. I’ll share more photos of the literary events I attend, too. I don’t want to say that I will post articles and reviews on my blog every week, but I will aim to post content a few times a month. And, I’ll be expanding my blog to include additional topics surrounding literature such as media adaptations and genres of literature that are not speculative fiction. 

Keep Up with My ARCs and Review Them On Time

            Last year, I joined NetGalley and volunteered to read books by authors for review on retail websites (i.e. Amazon, B&N, etc.). Now, I have not been able to keep track, read, and review all of the books I said I review last year (I still have to complete the ones I missed), but I plan on reviewing as many of those books on time. In addition, I’ve been in contact with authors and I agreed to read and to review their ARCs. Many of the stories I read and review are worth reading, and I said so to other readers. 

            I already started reading my ARCs for 2019 with plans of completing most, if not all, of them. Like I said, I’ll be reading, reviewing and sharing other genres of literature as well. I will continue to let you know whether or not those books are worth reading. Yes, I take requests and I will make time to read your ARCs if you ask me to. 

Keep Up with my Social Media Pages

            I’ve put more work and effort into my blog and my social media pages. This blog is running more actively, my Goodreads page gets updated daily, and my social media accounts are more active with more friends and more followers (I thank you all for your support). I have started a Patreon account, which I hope to get running within the next few weeks. I will keep up with all I mentioned earlier with the new content on a more regular basis. My hope is that this becomes more than what it is at its current state. 

Read 100 Books and Share Them on My Goodreads Page

            In 2018, I read 70 books—based on my Goodreads page—and I know that I read more than that amount. This is probably because the books I reviewed made it to all of my social media pages. Sometimes you read a book just for “fun,” or for a “quick read.” You don’t think of sharing every book you’ve read, but sometimes you forget to mention it at all to other readers. Because of Goodreads, I am aware of the benefits of sharing those reads with other readers such as: meeting new people, attending books events, and learning about more books. It’s not that I want to share ALL of the books I read on Goodreads, but I will definitely include more of the books I enjoy the most on my page!

Some of the Books I Plan on Reading

Books Released in 2018 that I did NOT get to read: Speculative Fiction

Graphic Novels I Need to Catch Up On

Noteworthy (and Completed) Trilogies

“Classic Works” of Speculative Fiction

ARCs & Sequels

Upcoming Releases

Titles that Piqued My Interest

YA Books I Want to Read

Non-Speculative Fiction Books

Non-Fiction Books

Let’s have fun reading together in 2019!

Why You Need to Read…My Selections for Best Speculative Fiction Books of 2018

2018 has been an amazing year for writers, editors, publishers, and readers of speculative fiction. Throughout this year, I’ve caught up with my reading of various genres in the print and digital formats. Also, I managed to read many of 2018’s new releases, and they were amazing reads. In fact, there were so many anticipated novels, novellas, short stories, non-fiction, and anthologies that I neither read, nor completed many of the books released in 2018. 

            There are two things I learned throughout all of this year’s readings. One, speculative fiction’s spectrum continues to lengthen including stories of all sorts from authors of multiple demographic backgrounds. Two, readers and publishers are becoming more and more aware of the sort of stories that could emerge from this broader genre of literature than the ‘older’ and ‘more rigid’ structures of the previous separate binary genres of the past.

            The award winners and nominees of all the literature prizes demonstrate how the mainstream is starting to publicize these authors more and more. N.K. Jemisin’s historic win at the Hugo Awards made the news on several major news networks. And, Haruki Murakami withdrew his nomination for the Nobel Prize in Literature so he could, “stay focused on his writing.” These big moments in the literary community captured the attention of non-speculative fiction readers and everyone else. Maybe literary scholars will begin to pay more attention to this genre the way Americans are starting to pay attention to football (a.k.a. soccer). 

            Although I did NOT get to read and/or to finish many of the 2018 releases—Foundryside by Robert Jackson Bennett; Circe by Madeline Miller; Children of Blood and Bone by Toni Adeyemi; Head On by John Scalzi; Tempests and Slaughter by Tamora Pierce;How Long ‘til Black Future Month? by N.K. Jemisin, etc.—I managed to read many books of all formats (and in other genres). Obviously, my focus for this posting is what I consider to be the best releases in speculative fiction of 2018. If you are curious as to the other books I’ve read or started reading in 2018, then you can checkout my list on my Goodreads page. 

               Originally, I was not going to do a ranking. There were many books I wanted to mention and I was going to categorize my list based on: debut novels, novels with distinctive narratives, novellas, and anthologies. However, when I spoke to my friends and other readers, I realized that I kept mentioning the same books over and over again. These books stood out to me the most, so a Top Ten list came together. 

            Once again, this is a list of my favorite speculative fiction books of 2018. There won’t be any “Honorable Mentions” here, and this list will be descending (#10-#1). If you believe I missed a book, or if you wish to comment on my choices, then please leave a message in the comments section.

#10 The Armored Saint (The Sacred Throne #1) by Myke Cole

            As I mentioned in my review of this novella on Goodreads, this novella is a good start to what will eventually be a series. And, since I have not read The Queen of Crowsyet, I can only assume that both the story and the pace will pick up in that book. Don’t get me wrong, the story is worth reading and is different from other stories I’ve read, but I wanted more from it, which is a good thing. For this reason, I cannot put this book any higher on my list. 

            That being said, The Armored Saintis an interesting medieval fantasy tale, which takes the notions of religion and combines it with the idea of technological warfare. In this case, giant armored bots (look at the cover) are the weapons of power. The story begins with the protagonist, Heloise, getting into trouble with those in power and she witnesses the death and the destruction of those she cares about. However, Myke Cole does not use tropes in the ‘clichéd’ way. Instead, readers are surprised at what happens to everyone within the protagonist’s inner circle. And, while this story ends with you wanting for more, you will believe you were cheated due to the slow pace of this novella.

#9Empire of Sandby Tasha Suri

            2018 was a year containing many amazing debut books by authors—many of whom are not Caucasian—and managed to reintroduce readers to the notions of “old magic” and the treatment of the individuals who have the innate ability to wield it. Empire of Sandtakes a look into a society in which clans of tribesmen and tribeswomen are abducted for “the good of the Empire.” 

            Mehr is the illegitimate daughter of one of the Imperial Governors who defies her family’s wishes and paranoia, and performs the magical rites of her mother’s family. When the Religious Order notices her, she is forced to become a ‘tool’ for the Empire. As I read this novel, the characters are what kept my attention the most. The protagonist’s love for her family and her mixed heritage are what drives the story. The story gets really interesting during the last 100 pages, and it’ll make you want the next book in the series sooner rather than later. 

#8Trail of Lightning (The Sixth World #1)by Rebecca Roanhorse

            This debut novel written by the 2018 Recipient of the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer takes place on a dystopian Earth, which ended due to climate change. The aftermath includes the return of Navajo deities and monsters. Maggie, a monster hunter with supernatural abilities, is hired to locate a missing girl. From there, the story turns into a scavenger hunt in what remains of the Southwestern region of the United States.

            This is the first fantasy novel involving Native American characters that I’ve read. Plus, I can see why Rebecca Roanhorse has been nominated for all the literary awards, and winning some of them. It’s not just about the idea that climate change is responsible for the dystopian society, but it includes the reminder that the ancient deities—no matter where they’re from and/or located—always have their desires over those of humans. The idea that the ‘end of the world’ leads to the return of the gods, so they can reform the world makes for a very intriguing story. 

#7Rosewaterby Tade Thompson

            I received an ARC of this book and I should have read it sooner, but I managed to read it all the same! This Afrocentric book tells an interesting story of individuals who use their innate abilities as part of their jobs, while residing near an alien dome. Yes, there was an alien invasion and every year people travel to Nigeria in order to be blessed with the healing powers of the dome. 

            This novel catches your attention with the reminder that a futuristic world will continue to have some of the same issues as we do in present society. In this case, cyber-hacking is a concern to the point where Kaaro, the protagonist, and others use their psychic abilities as part of their job description for both the local bank and (in Kaaro’s case) the government. After the annual healing ceremony, things go well and poorly for Kaaro. While he gets into an intimate relationship, Kaaro realizes that there is more happening to him and to those in his community. Some of it involves his past and some of it involves the changes occurring within his society. The blend of science, fantasy, and religion makes Rosewaterstand out from the rest of 2018’s speculative fiction releases. And, like the previous mentions, readers can expect a follow up book to be released in 2019. 

#6 The Black God’s Drums by P. Djèlí Clark

            I mentioned pacing as being essential to telling a story and Clark does an excellent job incorporating it into his novella, The Black God’s Drums. The setting is Post Civil War Louisiana where the technology is advanced and dangerous. Gender roles and terrorism are at the center of this steampunk thriller in which a young woman, Creeper, overhears a plot to bomb New Orleans during Mardi Gras. 

            The best thing about this novella is that I forget I was reading a novella! Creeper’s adventure in New Orleans does not occur through the span of a few weeks. Instead, the story and the dilemma occur and resolve within approximately 24-48 hours! The way Clark presents this story has you realizing that you are reading the action in real-time! For anyone who wants a quick and a fun tale, then I highly recommend The Black God’s Drums. I can’t wait to read more from this author!

#5Vengeful (Villains #2)by V.E. Schwab

            Recently, I started reading Schwab’s books, and I can say that my interest in her other books and series continues to increase. Vengeful is the second book in the Villains series, and it lives up to both the fans’ expectations, and its title. Vengeful begins where Viciousends, and it’s a marvelous continuation of what happens to the characters from the first story. In addition, Schwab introduces us to new characters that either are EO’s, or know about them.

            What I enjoyed the most about Vengefulis that Schwab continues to incorporate her take on the concept of ‘superheroes.’ In Schwab’s world, anyone can become an EO, but not everyone receives an ability worthy of awe. In addition, there are consequences pertaining to EO’s, and it reminds readers that anything involving magic, the supernatural, or the unknown comes at a cost. The new characters readers follow is another reminder regarding the name of the series. There are no ‘good superheroes’ in this story. 

#4The Poppy Warby R.F. Kuang

            This debut novel is based on the history of the Sino-Japanese War and the culture of China until that war. Readers learn about Chinese schooling, Chinese warfare, and shamanism. Rin is an orphan who decides that her only chance at a better life is an admission into Sinegard, the most elite military school in her country. While she does get into the university, Rin will have to train harder in order to remain a student there. Unfortunately, by the time Rin completes her training and her education, war breaks out and she’ll have to use everything she’s learned for her survival. 

            I enjoyed The Poppy Warbecause of the blending of history and fantasy. It’s interesting to read a book, which is influenced by another country’s history and culture. It’s a reminder that there are more aspects to our world than we know about. The best part of reading The Poppy Waris learning about the protagonist and the other characters who are learning and putting their training into action. Yes, the battle scenes and its aftermath are brutal reminders of war, but the scenes at the school are brutal reminders of the risks people take in order to achieve their goals. 

#3 Spinning Silver by Naomi Novik

            I received an ARC for this novel, too; and, I couldn’t help it, but I started reading Spinning Silver, as soon as I got it. Spinning Silveris a companion novel to Novik’s award winning, Uprooted. This time, the tale is a retelling of Rumpelstiltskinand a cautionary tale of saying a ‘few harmless words.’ While Miryem is the main focus in Spinning Silver, she is not the only protagonist. For this reason, it makes the story all the more interesting. What will all the female characters (and one young male character)—from various backgrounds, with different dilemmas—do when the odds continue to buildup against them?

            I knew that I would love Spinning Silvereven before I received it! Naomi Novik does an amazing job blending folklore into her fantasy tales. Folklore is the idea of customs, traditions and practices that get pass along through generations without keep any formal track of them, such as stories. Novik provides examples of such practices in Spinning Silver. It gives her readers something familiar while reading her fantasy stories!

#2 The Murderbot Diaries (#1-4) by Martha Wells

            This series was going to be my #1 pick of 2018 until I read the book that would push it back to #2. And, I know I’m cheating because the first novella, All Systems Red, was released in 2017, but since it won all of the awards in 2018, and you need to read the first novella in order to read the rest of them, so I rest my case! All four novellas in this series take place in consecutive order, with Artificial Conditionand Rogue Protocolfollowing the first novella, and the story concludes with Exit Strategy, for now. 

            Before reading Martha Wells’ books, I have not read any books about robot protagonists. However, The Murderbot Diariesare told from the point-of-view of a Security Unit, or SecUnit for short, who is a robot that offers contracted protection. In the case of our SecUnit, readers learn that it chooses to follow orders because it is not under the control of its manufacturers. In other words, the SecUnit went ‘rogue’ before the events of All Systems Red. All of the actions and the decisions our SecUnit makes throughout the novellas are choices it made itself and for its own reasons. I enjoyed every single book in this series and the series is a fun read for all science fiction readers. Yes, the SecUnit knows how to fight! I cannot wait until the upcoming novel is published! 

#1Vita Nostraby Marina and Sergey Dyachenko

            Every once in a while, one comes across a book, or a story, that is so captivating and impacting that it alters your view of literature. Not only does it find its way to your all-time favorite books list, but also has you searching for similar books in the same (sub)genre. I find it shocking that this award-winning novel from Ukraine was published in 2007! Why did it take over 10 years to get this novel in English?

            The way Marina and Sergey Dyachenko tell this story is interesting. Sasha is ‘selected’ to become a candidate to an exclusive vocational school, before the start of her senior year in high school. Throughout that year, Sasha performs and accomplishes all of the tasks presented to her even as she notices some minor changes within herself. Once she becomes a student at the college, Sasha is pushed to her limits to the point of physical, mental, and emotional exhaustion. Yet, Sasha and her classmates continue with their studies because failure does NOT equate expulsion! Readers learn with Sasha and the other students as to why they were ‘selected’ and what they hope to achieve by the end of their education at ‘that’ school. Vita Nostrais the first book in the Metamorphosisseries; and, I hope we get the translations of those books sooner rather then later. 

            This is one of the best books I have ever read! Yes, I enjoy stories—regardless of its genre—that standout; Vita Nostrais an example of a story that takes its genre to a higher level. As I read the story and the events surrounding Sasha’s education, her growth into adulthood, and her disgruntled interactions with her family, I realized Vita Nostra is one of the best examples of what speculative fiction could be! The idea that there is more to our mundane world is nothing new to readers of the genre, but the way the authors present that notion through their writing leaves you in awe of everything you’ll read in this novel!

            My favorites of 2018 contain books within the speculative fiction spectrum ranging from science fiction to fantasy, from folklore to alternative history, and from paranormal to metaphysical. And, while many of my picks are part of a continuing series, each book stood out to me due to the plot, the story, the setting, the characters, the pacing, etc. While there were many other noteworthy books released in 2018 that I have not read yet, I plan on reading those books while reading both other books and new releases in 2019.

            2019 already looks promising with the books being released as well as others that may or may not get the same level of attention. Many of them sound exciting, but reading them will determine which stories get passed along. I hope this list provided some insight as to which books I enjoyed the most in 2018 and why. Let us continue reading in the New Year. 

Why You Need to Read: “Vicious”

By: V.E. Schwab

Vicious: Villains: Book 1

Published: September 24, 2013

Genre: Adult/Science Fiction/Fantasy/Paranormal/Superheroes

            Victor had set the deadline to rattle him, put him on edge. He was disturbing Eli’s calm, like a kid dropping rocks into a pond, making ripples, and Eli saw him doing it and still felt rippled, which perturbed him even more. Well, Eli was taking back control, of his mind and his life and his night. (Part 2, Chapter XXII).

            V.E. Schwab’s first adult novel is part X-Men, part The Count of Monte Cristo, and part Frankenstein. Let me make this clear: in my opinion, those popular works influence this story, but this novel will grasp your attention from its opening pages. By the time you finish reading this book, you’ll be a fan of V.E. Schwab!

            The plot is centered on an upcoming showdown between two former college roommates turned frienemies: Victor Vale and Eli Ever. However, this showdown is not focused on who is more powerful, or who is the “true” criminal, it is to settle their college rivalry once and for all! Yes, Victor Vale and Eli Ever display the worst toxic masculinity I’ve ever read in a book! And, both men have NOT seen each other in a decade, yet one never forgot the other. 

            The narrative has multiple P.O.V.’s across the events of the past and the present. Readers learn about Victor and Eli’s relationship, their current companions and how they all met, and the concept of EO’s and why those who identify as EO’s are “changed individuals.” While the narrative is broken into fragments transcending time, the method works because it connects the past to the present in order to understand the motives and the traits of each character. In addition, it allows for the reader to understand why the series is titled Villains.

            The characters—Victor, Eli, Serena, Sydney, and Mitch—are the focus of this novel. It is important to know that Mitch is the only one of these main characters who is NOT an EO; and yes, that is relevant to the story! Victor and Eli are former college roommates who became EO’s deliberately, while Serena and Sydney Clarke—yes, sisters—became EO’s after an accident. Ironically, the Clarke sisters meet up with Victor and Eli, placing them on opposing sides of the “villains” spectrum. One side believes they are “heroes” and the other side knows they are the “villains.” Their pasts and the interactions with each other explains the pathology of the characters which tells the readers that EO’s aren’t terrifying, but malicious people who happen to be EO’s are the actual villains.

            The style of Viciouswill remind you of either a graphic novel/comic book, or a thriller story. Schwab builds suspense by having the characters recall the events of the past, which are the reasons the opposing pairs are determined to faceoff against each other. The author goes even further with the concept of EO’s, one must survive a near death experience, but he/she/they lose something else in return. In other words, an individual survives death, gains an ability of some sort—“good” or “bad”—but that person loses something in return as a grotesque payment. The four main characters were already damaged individuals before, but now their natures have become reduced even more because they became EO’s. 

            The appeal surrounding this novel is interesting. Vicioushas a cult following that’s lasted these past five years, and it’s a shame because I realized (and I could be wrong) many people still have not read this novel. I want to say that it is because of the cult following, not the mainstream publicity, that Schwab is able to craft both books to her liking knowing her fans will read them no matter what, and she is right! 

           The sequel, Vengeful, was released in September 2018 both to critical acclaim and to ardent readers. Vengefulwon the “Goodreads Choice Awards 2018” in the “Best Science Fiction” category. Congratulations to V.E. Schwab on the win!

            If you read my Why You Need to Read: These Books While Waiting for “The Winds of Winter” post, then you already know that I highly recommend this novel! This dark paranormal novel takes all of its influences and takes it to a whole new level. And, the author goes into why rivalries—friendship and family—can become toxic to the point of obsession. If you are looking for a recent speculative fiction novel that stands apart from others in the genre, then pick up Vicious!

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW!

Why You Need to Read “The Murderbot Diaries” Series

The Murderbot Diaries                                              

By: Martha Wells

Published:  All Systems Red released May 2, 2017

                     Artificial Condition released May 8, 2018

                    Rogue Protocol released August 7, 2018

                    Exit Strategy released October 2, 2018

             Untitled Murderbot Novel expected in 2020

Genre: Science Fiction

Winner of the Nebula Award for Best Novella 2017, the Hugo, the Alex, and the Locus Award for Best Novella 2018

PLEASE NOTE: The following contains minor spoilers for all four novellas. You have been warned.

Murderbots aren’t allowed to ride with the humans and I had to have verbal permission to enter. With my cracked governor there was nothing to stop me, but not letting anybody, especially the people who held my contract, know that I was a free agent was kind of important. Like, not having my organic components destroyed and the rest of me cut up for parts important (Chapter 1).

Out of the numerous stories and representations of robots—whether or not they are AI’s or drones—Murderbot is the most interesting one in recent years. All Systems Red, the first novella in the series, has won numerous awards since its 2017 publication. These intriguing science fiction tales of an acerbic robot who travels the galaxy in search of its identity, the humans who created it, and the humans who hired it are a humorous and a descriptive look into both Martha Wells’ galaxy and at the spectrum of robots and their relationship to humans.

All Systems Red opens with Murderbot, a Security Unit, performing its job—with a new contract with a new crew of scientists on a hostile planet—and complaining how it wants to be left alone to re-watch his favorite TV show, Sanctuary Moon. Also, it found a way to hack its government module, so it can store more entertainment shows, and not follow company issued orders as much. Typically, Security Units, or “SecUnits, or any other robot for that matter, will be dismantled if it is discovered that they have gone “rogue.”

Our SecUnit wants nothing more than to perform its job protecting humans, so it can watch human TV shows to criticize. The current group it is assigned to is willing to interact with it. At the same time, the SecUnit and the scientists realize that the planet is more hostile than mentioned in their report.

Throughout this story, readers learn that the SecUnit is still willing to perform its job, regardless of going “rogue,” and that it calls itself, “Murderbot.” However, it does question its purpose and its past; all the while it is trying to learn and to determine humans and their behavior. It could be the reason it watches all those TV shows.

Unfortunately, this assignment is not a simple one. To the dismay of both Murderbot and the scientists: Mensah, Pin-Lee, Ratthi, Gurathin and others, there are hostiles on the planet, and they attack the group. Our SecUnit demonstrates its abilities as both a fighter and a strategist. Murderbot perform its tasks to the extreme gratitude of the scientists—it gets “bought”—and, it believes there was a plot set by the corporation, GrayCris, to harm everyone—human and AI—who travel to the planet.

By the end of this story, Murderbot decides to leave its new “owner” in order to determine what the corporation, GrayCris, and its parent companies, such as Port FreeCommerce, have done to it, the scientists, and the other Security Units. In addition, it is worried about losing its purpose so maybe it wants to be able to perform what it was designed to do one last time.

Artificial Condition picks up where All Systems Red leaves off, with our SecUnit traveling in disguise through a crowded station in order to complete its quest. It is shocked when it see itself on the news and reported as “missing.” However, it is still determined to accomplish its task, alone.

Murderbot ends up on a transport with a research robot that decides to assist our protagonist on its journey by providing it with a disguise. The interaction between the two AIs is what makes this story very poignant. Murderbot “appreciates” the help the other AI gives it. In return, the two AIs watch episodes of TV shows and discuss the realities and the misconceptions in them, particularly about the various AIs presented on the shows.

This novella is more about character development than anything involving GrayCris and the scientists, but it allows readers to learn more about AIs when there are no humans around. Murderbot displays its humanity by going against what it was programmed to do. This is a rogue bot with a scrambled governor module that still performs its task to offer protection to humans. And yet, everything is tied to GrayCris.

Rogue Protocol has our SecUnit at the location of a GrayCris excavation site in order to commence its investigation into the company. Once again, Murderbot finds itself working with a group of humans and their “pet” AI. Only this time, both the humans, and the readers learn how corrupt GrayCris is and how much effort the company puts into keeping its secrets from everyone else.

Our SecUnit continues to think about its owner, Dr. Mensah, and the other human scientists it left behind while assisting this group of scientists and researchers and keeping them from making the same almost fatal blunders as Murderbot’s group of humans. Murderbot continues to fascinate us by performing more of its functions: hacking, thinking, communicating, and fighting. Martha Wells reminds us that our protagonist is NOT a rogue SecUnit with a violent streak! Unfortunately, the “enemy” AIs are aware of what Murderbot is capable of doing without its governor module. And, all for some alien remnants.

Murderbot is able to collect the evidence needed to prove GrayCris’ corruption and illegal activities. Although the consequences to the mission leaves Murderbot feeling guilty (even though it won’t admit it), it is confident that everything will work out once it returns to HaveRatton Station and Dr. Mensah. Too bad the readers are human and know the lengths corruption can reach.

Exit Strategy comes full circle for Murderbot’s personal mission. Murderbot returns to HaveRatton Station with the evidence needed to takedown GrayCris only to learn that its owner/friend, Dr. Mensah, has been abducted and is being held captive by the corporation due to its actions. Because no one is aware that Murderbot is a rogue SecUnit—with a few exceptions—it realizes quickly the possible repercussions of its actions against GrayCris. Feeling responsible, Murderbot decides to find the rest of the Preservation Team—Pin-Lee, Ratthi, and Gurathin—to rescue Mensah.

Reuniting with the characters from All Systems Redis both refreshing and directing because readers are reminded as to why Murderbot decided to defy orders—again—and function in a way it believes is the right way. At the same time, it is reminded that it still cares for the Preservation Team and why its relationships with them remind it of the AIs and the other humans from its journey to and from the GrayCris excavation site. Murderbot learns about the desperation and the collaboration of both GrayCris and Port FreeCommerce, too.

Murderbot’s role in the rescue of Mensah is all that readers expect and more. It has to think like both a bot and a human constantly because that is whom it is up against. Martha Wells does an excellent job describing the rescue mission, incorporating the characters’ dialogue, and hinting at Murderbot’s wants and purposes now that it fulfilled its goal. The ending suggests that Murderbot will be able to continue performing what it is programed to do, helping humans, while enjoying its hobby, watching media.

In all, Martha Wells’ The Murderbot Diaries delivers what science fiction readers want: a flawed but relatable protagonist, a look at the (continuing) issues amongst the human race, various settings and locations in space, dialogues with humans and AIs, and several fights involving humans and AIs with guns. Now, all we need besides the upcoming Murderbot novel is an episode of Sanctuary Moon.

My final rating: MUST Read It Now!

A Look Into: America’s Top 10 Books Based on “The Great American Read”

Tonight, Tuesday, October 23, 2018, PBS will announce, based on votes, which book is “America’s Best-Loved Book.” The series and the vote were announced last spring, and the last few weeks have given viewers and readers a brief in-depth look into each book. The 100 books were categorized based on theme, not genre, which makes it for a more relevant look into the books. Now, PBS has reached the end of the series, viewers have reached the end of voting, and American readers will know which book was selected as “America’s Best-Loved Book.”

Twelve days ago, the Top 10 Books, based on voting were announced. Here they are, not listed by vote rank:

Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White                       Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell         The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis        Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë                         Harry Potter (series) by J.K. Rowling           Little Women by Louisa May Alcott                    The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien        Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen       Outlander (series) by Diana Gabaldon        To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Take a look at the way I listed PBS’ Top 10 Books. Have you noticed anything? The column to the left has a list of books that can be categorized under the “fantasy” genre; and, the column to the right has a list of books that can be categorized as “historical” fiction. What does this say about America’s taste in literature? What does it say about the notions surrounding fantasy literature?

First, the historical fiction books; two novels take place (before,) during (and after) the American Civil War, two novels are about society in England during the 1800s, and one novel is about segregation in the United States during The Great Depression. All of these novels give readers insight into the social dissonance occurring during certain moments in human history. People have either read one or more of these books for school, or saw the film adaptation at some point in the lives. Their stories are familiar by all, and well loved by readers.

Now, for the fantasy books, all of which have at least one media adaptation whether or not it’s movie or television. Lewis, Tolkien and Rowling are from Britain, and E.B. White—not to be confused with T.H. White, author of The Once and Future King—and Diana Gabaldon are from the United States. Each of these fantasy novels (and series) falls under different subgenres. Charlotte’s Web and The Chronicles of Narnia are for children and have talking animals, which comes from Aesop’s Fables; Harry Potter is a bildungsroman series that follows Harry Potter and his friends and schoolmates as they learn about magic and prepare to fight against the evil wizard, Lord Voldemort; and, The Lord of the Rings and Outlander are fantasy novels that make up a larger compendium of books set in the world the characters reside in, Middle-earth and 18th Century Scotland, respectively.

It’s interesting how fantasy fiction is beloved enough to keep the genre growing and going. Fantasy and fairy stories are not only for children—read Tolkien’s essay, On Fairy Stories—but also they are not enjoyed by all children. Children who grew up reading fantasy and fairy tales grow up and write stories of the same genre as adults. And, some of those stories are for adult readers. The author determines the audience whom his/her/their story is read; and yet, two of the fantasy books in the Top 10 are fantasy stories for adults. The Lord of the Rings takes place in a fantasy world, and in Outlander, the protagonist time travels to the past by means of supernatural elements.

Fantasy has been an established literary genre since the publication of both The Chronicles of Narnia (1950) and The Lord of the Rings (1954). Lewis and Tolkien are recognized as being two of the authors who helped solidify the genre. Lewis Carroll and L. Frank Baum wrote Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (1865) and Through the Looking Glass (1871), and The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) and its sequels, respectively, which were a few of the early fantasy books in which the fantasy genre emerged. All of the mentioned books were popular enough for media adaptations, and those films brought more attention to the books. Harry Potter brought fantasy to a towering level that no one saw coming. Fantasy literature is an established, recognized, and read genre. Hence, the books that made it into “The Great American Read” Top 10 List.

Do I believe any of the fantasy novels in the Top 10 will be chosen as “America’s Best-Loved Book”? No, I do not, but not due to the reason you may or may not believe. While I am an enthusiastic reader of the fantasy (and other speculative fiction) genre, I—like everyone else—had to read certain books as a student in grade school and in college. And, I enjoyed reading some of those books for my English classes. I was able to relate to the characters and comprehend the social issues mentioned throughout each novel. Some of the themes found in those novels still resonate in today’s society. I’m not saying that that isn’t the case with the fantasy books in the Top 10, but one novel calls out “America” to me whenever I think about the title. And, that book is To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee.

First published in 1960, during the American Civil Rights Movement, To Kill a Mockingbird follows Scout and her family who are living in Alabama during The Great Depression. This coming-of-age novel illustrates the loss of innocence Scout and her brother, Jem, experience when their father, Atticus—a lawyer, defends a disabled black man accused of raping a white woman. This Pulitzer Prize winning novel has been said to be a literary response to the murder of Emmett Till, a 14 year-old boy from Chicago who was brutally lynched after being accused of whistling at a white woman while visiting relatives in Mississippi on August 28, 1955. Emmett Till’s murder sparked outrage nationwide, and was the event that would eventually lead to the start Civil Rights Movement.

Over 60 years later, To Kill a Mockingbird remains on school reading lists and is listed as an “American Classic.” Personally, I believe this novel has just as many life lessons and memorable characters such as Aslan from Narnia, Gandalf from Middle-earth, Professor Dumbledore from Hogwarts, and Charlotte from Zuckerman’s Farm. As someone who grew up during the publication of the Harry Potter books while old enough to read To Kill a Mockingbird, I found the former books to be enjoyable and the latter book to be more thought provoking as I continue living in a changing United States.

Harper Lee does not shy away from the issues of race and class in her novel. In addition, she was not afraid of including the harsh reality of life that her child characters had to witness and to endure. To Kill a Mockingbird continues to teach readers of all ages that judging people based on their traits and not their appearances or their living situation is essential to being a good person. Yes, there are people who harm the innocent and get away with it, but treating people the way they deserve to be treated—with respect—goes a long way.

PBS’ “The Great American Read” allowed denizens in the U.S. to review what many people read and enjoy. The great thing about the special was that all genres of literature were considered. Furthermore, the special gave insight into which books, many which remain on school reading lists, are and remain popular by readers and non-readers alike.