Pick a Number Reading Challenge

I’ll have to attempt this challenge sometime in the future!

Graceling Accountant

Hey Ya’ll!

So if you saw yesterday’s post you might have read that I basically created myself a monthly reading challenge. This challenge is a combination of Bookopoly and “My Family Member picks my TBR”. Basically I’ve created a list of challenges, and every month I pick (usually 2) family members to pick 3 numbers between one and thirty, which will correlate to various challenges to frame my TBR around. 

For me, choosing by challenge rather than giving myself strict book choices to read from is a LOT less pressure and I think will ultimately lead to me reading more. The purpose of this post is basically just to tell you guys about this challenge, and to list out the challenges I’m using each month in case it might help you guys to read more.


The Challenges


  1. Read a library book
  2. Read a book recently recommended on Youtube
  3. Read an…

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8 years of suffering under Barack Obama

Teri Carter's Library

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3C54DC7D00000578-4140672-Barack_Obama_waves_as_he_boards_Marine_One_and_departs_the_Capit-a-77_1484945371469 Photo credit: The Associated Press

The sentence I hear most from well-meaning, conservative friends since President Trump’s election is this: “We suffered 8 years under Barack Obama.”

Fair enough. Let’s take a look.

The day Obama took office, the Dow closed at 7,949 points. Eight years later, the Dow had almost tripled.

General Motors and Chrysler were on the brink of bankruptcy, with Ford not far behind, and their failure, along with their supply chains, would have meant the loss of millions of jobs. Obama pushed through a controversial, $8o billion bailout to save the car industry. The U.S. car industry survived, started making money again, and the entire $80 billion was paid back, with interest.

While we remain vulnerable to lone-wolf attacks, no foreign terrorist organization has successfully executed a mass attack here since 9/11.

Obama ordered the raid that killed Osama Bin Laden.

He drew down the number…

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Why You Need to Read: “Red Sister”

Book of the Ancestor: Book One: Red Sister

By: Mark Lawrence

Published: April 4, 2017

Genre: Fantasy, Grimdark

            A small thing in shapeless linen—not street rags, covered in rusty stains, but a serf’s wear none the less. She might be nine…This girl was a fierce creature, a scowl on her thin dirty face. Eyes black below a short shock of ebony hair, (Chapter 2).

            There is no doubt in my mind (or anyone else’s) that Mark Lawrence is one of the most popular fantasy authors in the world right now. Whether or not it’s Lawrence’s SPFBO Contest on his website, his latest novellas advertised on Amazon, or his popular novels, more and more readers are reading his books. I’ll be talking about his latest trilogy about a convent that teaches girls how to kill and to use magic. Red Sister is the first book in the Book of the Ancestor Trilogy. 

            The story follows Nona Grey, our protagonist, from the moment she is given to a child-seller—Giljohn, through the first few years—ages 9 to 13—of her education at the Convent of Sweet Mercy where she learns more about the abilities she’s been trying to hide from other people. Other characters include her classmates: Clera, Ara, Hessa, Jula, and Ruli; her instructors: Sisters Glass, Rose, Wheel, Apple, Pan, Rule, and Tallow; and other characters who interact with Nona including Raymel Tacsis, the man Nona almost killed. All of these characters are tied to Nona’s education and potential involvement surrounding the “Chosen One” prophecy. Unfortunately, Nona has to learn how to defend herself from the nobles who want her dead for attacking a nobleman in self-defense. Nona’s development goes from her being a poor illiterate child to a novice at the Convent to one of the “candidates” who could be the “Chosen One,” and saving the world. Throughout her early education, Nona learns who to trust and who to stay away from, and nothing is what it seems.

            The plot of Red Sister is Nona’s education at the Convent of Sweet Mercy as well as learning about the abilities she has within herself. In the world of Abeth, four tribes with remarkable traits settled and intermarried with non-magical humans. Centuries later, their descendants can have the traits of Gerant (great size), Hunska (speed and agility), Marjal (elemental magic), and/or Quantal (walkers of the Path and users of greater magic). While it is rare for anyone to have one of these traits, it is believed that one day a “Chosen One,” an individual with all four traits, will appear and save the world from ice and darkness. Nona is one of those who is suspected of being the “Chosen One.” This notion is slammed by many people at the Convent, including Nona herself. However, this subplot is essential to Nona’s character development as she demonstrates her abilities to her instructors because there are many who believe that the “Chosen One” is one of the girls at the Convent of Sweet Mercy. It is obvious that this subplot will become the plot in the later books, but for now, Nona’s education and discovery about herself is the plot in this book. Her interactions with everyone at the Convent who believes, or encourages, the “Chosen One” prophecy is essential to both the plot development and the development of all of the characters. 

            The narrative in Red Sister is limited omniscient narration. Readers get the point-of-view of Nona and a few other characters throughout the story, some of which are told in flashback. In fact, Nona’s first P.O.V. chapter isn’t until chapter 3 and it begins with a flashback. These multiple points-of-view allows for a swifter narration of the story. In the first two chapters (not including the Prologue), readers learn that Nona is about to be executed for attacking a nobleman who attacked Nona’s friend—who is executed before Nona. The very next chapter is the discussion of who gets “custody” of Nona: Partniss Reeve—the owner of fighters who bought Nona from Giljohn, and Sister Glass—the Abbess of Sweet Mercy—who has her own reasons for wanting Nona. Nona leaves with Abbess Glass knowing, at 9 years-old, to expect retaliation from the family of the man she attacked. Another chapter is told in flashback from the P.O.V. of one of Nona’s classmates, and there are several parts of the story that follows a few of the Sisters from the Convent. It does get confusing at times, but this narration helps with Nona’s character development from how Nona sees herself and everyone else, to knowing everyone else’s opinions about Nona. This is an interesting narration because it seems that how Nona sees herself is on par with how everyone else sees her. 

            The way Mark Lawrence wrote Red Sister is a change in direction fantasy readers have become used to: a prophecy is made, the one who fits the prophecy arrives and works with others in order to fulfill it. Only, the author decided to play with that concept and the expectations surrounding prophecy. Repeating ideas used by both J.K. Rowling and George R.R. Martin, Mark Lawrence demonstrates how prophecy can exploit and can harm several people with a (potential) notion that it will all be worth it once the world is safe again. The tone of this book is focuses on the hows and the whys prophecies come about and how more harm can and does come from them before they are fulfilled. Harry Potter’s life was altered because of a prophecy, and several characters throughout Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fireseries are affected by prophecy and suffer because of it. However, will the “prophecy” about the “Chosen One” come to fulfillment in Lawrence’s story? Some characters say, “yes” and many more say, “no.” The mood throughout this novel is how each character feels about the prophecy surrounding the “Chosen One.” And, it seems many of them find the prophecy more of a burden than a blessing. Maybe that’s what Lawrence’s style is supposed to present to readers, witnessing a “prophecy” come true and how everyone involved would react to it. 

            The appeal surrounding Red Sister have been immensely positive worldwide. Presenting a world in which privilege has more power over those with power, as well as a convent with killer nuns makes this novel a must read for all fantasy fans. I kept hearing about this trilogy from other fantasy readers who swore that it was worth reading. Fans of both Tamora Pierce and Robin Hobb will enjoy this series the most. Fans of George R.R. Martin will appreciate the influence and the Easter Eggs found throughout the book. Red Sister covers the first half of Nona’s education at the Convent and the buildup surrounding both the prophecy and Nona’s past. This makes the next book in the trilogy, Grey Sister, a must read for anyone who craves to know what happens next. I am one of those readers, and I can say that Red Sister is a must read for all fantasy fans.

            Red Sister is a novel that made its way from my TBR list to my Read list. Just like The Name of the Wind, Red Sister is a fun and a fast read that presents all sides of the protagonist to the other characters (and to the readers). The realism presented within this story is one of the many reasons why I enjoyed Red Sister so much. Nona is a well-developed character who knows what she is to those involved in her life and it makes you want to keep reading to know what happens to her next. It’s why I’m already reading Grey Sister and Holy Sister afterwards. Even if you’re not a fan of fantasy, Red Sister’s focus on the characters and their personalities is enough of a reason to start reading this book.

My rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!

Why You Need to Read: “Gods of Jade and Shadow”

Gods of Jade and Shadow

By: Silvia Moreno-Garcia

Published: July 23, 2019

Genre: Fantasy, Folklore, Historical Fiction, Mythology

            Casiopea Tun, named after a constellation, was born under the most rotten star imaginable in the firmament. She was eighteen, penniless, and had grown up in Uukumil, a drab town where mule-drawn railcars stopped twice a week and the sun scorched out dreams, (Chapter 1). 

            I read this ARC in 4 days (finishing it after midnight on the 5thmorning)! I was that engrossed in this story that reminded me of both Isabel Allende and Gabriel Garcia Márquez with story elements similar to both Rick Riordan and Katherine Arden. Gods of Jade and Shadow is a beautiful blend of history, culture, and mythology. Anyone who is a fan of standalone works such as The Wolf in the Whale and The Sisters of the Winter Wood will love this book by Silvia Moreno-Garcia. 

            There are 4 protagonists in this story, but the focus is on Casiopea Tun. She is the granddaughter of Cirilo Leyva, the wealthiest man in town, but you wouldn’t know it based on her appearance and her demeanor. Because her mother had married a poor native man—who later died—both Casiopea and her mother live as servants to their family. Casiopea and her mother clean and cook for their relatives while the rest of the family live comfortably according to their socioeconomic status. All the while, Casiopea’s cousin, Martín—who is also Cirilo’s only grandson and 2 years older than Casiopea—entertains himself by bullying Casiopea. Unlike Casiopea—who is pragmatic, yet hopeful—Martín is the traditional spoiled heir who has nothing else going for him except for his family name and the wealth that comes with it. He wants nothing more than his grandfather’s approval, which he never earns, and he believes his cousin has it (which she doesn’t). After a spat between the two cousins, Casiopea opens a mysterious chest under her grandfather’s bed with the key he left behind. When she opens the chest, she finds a pile of bones that revive into Hun-Kame, Lord of Shadows and rightful ruler of Xibalba, the Mayan Underworld. Casiopea learns that Hun-Kame was betrayed and imprisoned by Vucub-Kame, his twin brother. Immediately, Casiopea is traveling with the god in order to locate his missing essences and to help him regain his throne. The twin deities, Hun-Kame and Vucub-Kame are static characters (for the most part) because they are gods who have personas which are not affected by any change. Martín Leyva is a complex character who is forced to confront his demons, his family, and his insecurities, but that doesn’t mean he becomes a better person. It is Casiopea Tun who undergoes the most character development throughout the story.     

            The plot is part folklore and part bildungsroman. The folklore aspect of the plot follows the Hero’s Quest in that Casiopea leaves her home and goes on a “divine” quest. Except, Casiopea is compelled to accompany a god on this journey, and she doesn’t have anything forcing her to remain at her home. The bildungsroman, or coming-or-age story, surrounds both Casiopea and Martín. The growth these characters undergo happens because they leave home. Casiopea sees her chance to see the world and to experience new things; Martín, who had left his home once before, has no choice but to have these experiences. I’m not saying that Martín doesn’t need the experience that comes with leaving home, but it’s obvious that the growth won’t have the same positive effect on him the way it will have on Casiopea. The twin deities play their roles as gods, limited direct interference, which is expected. The subplot in this novel is family and family dynamics. Even though the setting is Mexico in 1927 (during The Jazz Age), some things remain universal and unchanged. There is nothing new about the spoiled heir and the “half-breed” child, but Moreno-Garcia makes sure that the long-term effects of such treatment and behavior remains realistic and believable. Martín, and the rest of the Leyva Family, know he’s not the heir anyone wants, but he’s the heir nonetheless, so the family finds it easier to indulge him rather than to curb his behavior. Casiopea, who is mistreated by the entire family, has a poor relationship with her mother because she never comes to Casiopea’s defense whenever she is abused by a relative. While both mother and daughter do care for each other, the relationship is strained. Casiopea goes on her adventure without hesitation because she has neither loyalty, nor emotional ties to her family. While there is both plot development and character development, the subplot of family develops and affects the plot within the story.  

            The narrative is an interesting one. First, there are multiple 1stperson point-of-view’s, and all 4 narratives are reliable because each character admits to his or her flaws and strengths during their P.O.V chapters. Next, the locations mentioned within the novel—with the exception of Uukumil(?)—are real places throughout Mexico. Readers can pull up a map of Mexico and follow the journey of the two adversaries throughout the narrative. Last, each of the characters provide both flashbacks and stream-of-consciousness throughout the narrative. Providing thoughts of both the past and the present not only allows readers to know what the characters are thinking at that particular moment, but also how and why they all think the way they do. This narrative method provides an understanding of each of these characters while allowing readers to choose for themselves whether or not they like, dislike, pity, etc. each character. The author incorporates all of these narratives into the story, yet it makes the story that much easier to follow along.

            The style Silvia Moreno-Garcia provides is a mixture of history, culture, and folklore. The historical events mentioned throughout the novel—automobiles, the Charleston, Prohibition, etc.—provides the mood of the story, which is modernity brings change. Each location throughout the story elaborates the clothing, the music, and the hustle and bustle illustrates how far behind the town of Uukumil is compared to the rest of Mexico. The culture reminds and informs readers that Mexico is a big country with a rich culture, but what Northern Mexico practices is not practiced in Central and Southern Mexico (necessarily). The folklore, while Mayan mythology is the main focus, fairy tales—such as “Cinderella”—is mentioned over and over. The author does an amazing job explaining Mayan mythology, Mexican culture and history, and pop culture, she mentions both fairy tales and poetry as cautionary tales to staying pragmatic no matter what is occurring in your life. In fact, that is the tone of the novel, staying humble regardless of any life changing events both positive and negative. Readers see the consequences of both examples within the story, and that moral is relevant in our modern times.

            The appeal surrounding Gods of Jade and Shadow are already positive (remember, I read an ARC of this novel). The book received advanced praise by critics and authors alike. And, it has been called one of the “Best Books of the Month” by Amazon and Barnes & Noble Sci-Fi & Fantasy Blog for July 2019. I did mention that fans of mythology-inspired fantasy will enjoy this novel the most. I should mention that several years ago, many people throughout the world became obsessed with Mayan culture and history when it was believed the world would end in 2012. This novel would appeal to them, too. This book can be read over and over again, and it belongs in the canon of mythological fantasy alongside Circe and American Gods. Fans of historical fiction will enjoy this novel as well. 

            Gods of Jade and Shadow is an informative and entertaining story about change, tradition, desire, and family. The honor of it being called one of the “Best Books of 2019” are not just words, but fact. This book is definitely one of my favorites of 2019. Silvia Moreno-Garcia conducts a grim, but magical journey throughout Mexico while reintroducing what we forgotten from our world history class. This novel is one of the best stories that balance fantasy and reality in recent years. This is an enjoyable story for readers of multiple genres.

My rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!!!

Why You Need to Read…My Selections for Best Speculative Fiction Books of 2019…So Far

We are halfway through 2019 and this year’s speculative fiction books have been both enjoyable and bountiful. Most of the books I’ve read so far this year have been amazing, and I still have A LOT of books in my TBR pile to go through. Like you, I’m an ardent reader and I’ll read just about anything I can get my hands on and has an interesting story. I’ve enjoyed novels, novellas, short stories across various genres of literature. If you’re interested in knowing some of the 51 books I’ve read between January 1stand June 30th2019, then please check out my Goodreads page here: https://www.goodreads.com/Misty306

            I’ve been trying to keep up with both ARCs, and the long list of nominations for this year’s Literary Awards as part of my Reading Award Challenge 2019. I knew it would be harder than it sounded, but I’ve read (and still reading) a lot of amazing books that I wouldn’t have done so otherwise. I suggest that you read a few of the numerous nominations for any of the 2019 SFF Awards. 

That being said, I wanted to point out some of speculative fiction books that were released in 2019 that I’ve enjoyed the most, so far. These are books I recommend you read, especially if you’re a fan of this genre of literature like I am. And, just so you know, these are books that I’ve read and finished between the 1sthalf of 2019. 

These are my Top Ten Picks in no particular order:

The Winter of the Witch (Winternight Trilogy #3) by Katherine Arden

The Wolf in the Whale by Jordanna Max Brodsky

In An Absent Dream (Wayward Children #4) by Seanan McGuire

Uncanny Collateral (Valkyrie Collections #1) by Brian McClellan

Seven Blades in Black (The Grave of Empires #1) by Sam Sykes

A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World by C.A. Fletcher

Aurora Rising (The Aurora Cycle #1) by Amie Kaufman & Jay Kristoff

An Illusion of Thieves (Chimera #1) by Cate Glass

Her Silhouette, Drawn in Water by Vylar Kaftan

Sisters of the Fire (Blood and Gold #2) by Kim Wilkins

Right now, I’m currently reading (released in 2019):

Broken Veil (Harbinger #5) by Jeff Wheeler

Velocity Weapon (The Protectorate #1) by Megan E. O’Keefe

One Word Kill (Impossible Times #1) by Mark Lawrence

Holy Sister (Book of the Ancestor #3) by Mark Lawrence

The Dragon Republic (The Poppy War #2) by R.F. Kuang

            Here are some of the MANY books I hope to read by the end of 2019 (many of these I received at Book Expo 2019!):  

            Those of my picks for the Best Speculative Fiction Books of 2019. I’m still aiming to read at least 100 books by the end of this year; and, I want to write as many reviews here, on Goodreads, on NetGalley and Edelweiss, and on Amazon and Barnes & Noble. If you have any suggestions on what I should read, then please mention them in the Comments Section below. Please keep in mind that I might not be able to get access to certain books for various reasons (i.e. no $$$, waitlist at the library, etc.). Yet, I want to read as much as I can before 2019 ends (it’ll make my Award Reading Challenge 2020 much easier). 

            Which speculative fiction books released in 2019 have been your favorite so far?