Why You Need to Read: “The Memory of Souls”

A Chorus of Dragons, #3: The Memory of Souls

By: Jenn Lyons

Published: August 25, 2020

Genre: Fantasy

Thank you Tor Books for sending me an eARC of this book! And, thank you for your patience on waiting for my review.

Note: There are a few spoilers from the first two books in A Chorus of Dragons series. 

            “The more I remember, the more I hate being able to remember,” Janel said. “It feels like another person taking over my mind. Someone else’s thoughts intruding on my own. I’m not…those people anymore,” (74: Who They Used to Be).

            The cast has been introduced. The conflict has been revealed. So, the story can continue, right? Many readers of any genre understand both stories and real life are more complex than they first appear to be. Fans of epics, sagas and (space) operas know to expect more from such stories, but they never know which direction the story will move throughout the narrative. The Memory of Souls, the third book in A Chorus of Dragons series, is the latest epic fantasy to provide more plot devices as the story reaches its climax. 

            All of the characters (and, I mean all of them) from the first two books in the series—The Ruin of Kings and The Name of All Things—are back as they all continue with their roles pertaining to the end-of-the-world. The protagonists include: Kihrin D’Mon—the man who murdered the last emperor of Quur; Janel Thernanon—the Black Knight; Thurvishar D’Lorus—the son of the last emperor of Quur, who was also an infamous necromancer; and, Tereath—a member of the Black Brotherhood. These protagonists were saved and are tasked by the gods to convince the vané—the last race of immortal beings—to perform a sacred ritual. Unfortunately, there are a few parties who attempt to stop this quest, but the reasons vary between each group. One group is the parents of the protagonists: Therin D’Mon and Khaeriel—Kihrin’s parents; Terindel—Tereath’s father; and, Tya—Janel’s mother, work to assist their kids with the strength of their abilities. Another group involves more relations to the protagonists: Khaemezra—Tereath’s mother; and, Relos Var—Thurvishar’s grandfather, are some of the antagonists in this story, but they are neither working together nor working towards the same goal. Then, there are the characters who are working towards their own goals. First, is Senera who is still working with Relos Var (blindly), and who still possesses ‘The Name of All Things.’ Second, is Suless, one of the immortal wizards who seeks vengeance on those who kept her captive. Last, is Talea who was the former slave girl Kihrin failed to save, but she appears to have gain her freedom. After the events in The Name of All Things, all of the protagonists and the characters realize the “actual threat” wasn’t Relos Var, but someone who is more ancient and more powerful than him. There are more characters, old and new, who appear throughout the story who either try to hinder or try to help the “heroes” save the world. Throughout this story, the protagonists develop as they journey on their quest(s) and learn more about themselves through each other. Granted some of the protagonists’ revelations are just as shocking to them as they are for us, but the way the protagonists handle them allow them to make the decisions they know are coming their way, and they won’t have to do the fighting alone. 

            There are two plots in this story. The first plot revolves around the “newest” threat to Quur, Vol Karoth, who after having one of his tethers cut loose by Kihrin (who was tricked into doing it by Relos Var) is closer to being freed from his prison. The second plot concerns ‘The Ritual of Night.’ Kihrin, Janel, Tereath and Thurvishar must convince the vané to perform the ritual so that Vol Karoth will be reimprisoned. The catch is the race who performs the ritual will lose their immortality, which is something the vané are not giving up willingly. So, how will the “heroes” convince the vané Vol Karoth is a threat who should not be unleashed onto the Quur Empire? There are two subplots in this novel, and both of them embellish and develop alongside the plots in this story. The first subplot concerns the mysterious character known as Grizzst. He is a famous wizard whose magic may or may not have saved Quur from destruction. And yet, so few people know who he is and what he’s done, so why is everyone searching for him now? The second subplot involves memories and past lives. There are the vane—who are immortal—and, the god-kings—immortal wizards—then, there is reincarnation. That’s right, on top of gashes and soul swapping, there is the reincarnation of souls. However, how often do you hear of people remembering their past lives? There were a few examples in The Ruin of Kings, but it’s happening a lot more in this book. In fact, some of what the characters are starting to remember might contain clues as to how to stop both Vol Karoth and Relos Var. These subplots are necessary because they refer back to the plots, which allows them to develop and to go at an appropriate rate.

            The narrative in this book is slightly different from the narratives in the first two books in the series. Unlike the first two books in the series—where the narration and the points-of-view go back-and-forth among 2-3 characters—this book follows the narratives of several characters—some old and some new. Similar to the previous books, all of the narrations are being compiled into a single chronicle which presents all of the events in the “chronological order” they occurred in. Most of the P.O.V.s are told in 3rd person omniscient with one narration told in 1st person. In terms of how the narration is present, pay attention to the title. This means the narration goes from stream-of-consciousness to memories—NOT flashbacks! Without giving away too many spoilers, these memories are essential to the narration because it provides even more insight into the world the author created and the actions several of the characters performed as well. Not to mention, the events of the past influence the decisions some of the characters make in the present for the future. Believe it or not, all of the characters are reliable narrators, and the narrative can be followed easily by the readers. 

            The style Jenn Lyons uses for The Memory of Souls continues with the chronicler. Unlike the first two books, there is only one oral speaker recounting events. All of the other characters have written their “experiences” and “gave” them to the chronicler to compile. In this book, readers witness the “arrangement” of all of the “participants” into one coherent text. And, let me say the chronicler (and the author) make it look easy. The mood in this novel is crusade. All of the parties go their separate ways in order to engage in a campaign either personal or divine. However, many of these campaigns go against (one or more of) the other one(s). When that is the case and the parties involved meet up, discord occurs—which is the tone in this novel. Readers should refer to the map, the glossary, the family tree, and the timeline throughout their reading of this book. The series is at the point where these references provide enough information and backstory without having to refer back to the previous books.

            The appeal for The Memory of Souls have been mostly positive. While most of the readers enjoyed this book, there were a few who either found the story to be confusing, or thought the series was “getting too long” (not my words). That being said, those readers might want to look up the difference between fantasy and epic fantasy. Not all fantasy series are trilogies! I’ve made this assumption with this series and other ones before the authors corrected me! This book and the previous books in A Chorus of Dragons belong in the (epic) fantasy canon. Fans who have stayed with this series this long can look forward to reading the next book in the series, The House of Always, when it is released (in 2021); especially with those cliffhangers, we all need to know what happens next. 

            The Memory of Souls is the climax of A Chorus of Dragons series, which will leave fans and readers with the (grimdark) question: does the ends justify the means? While the story doesn’t omit any of the detail, it does leave readers with several more questions about the direction the author seems to be moving it in. No one is expected to survive the end of this series, but we’ll have to read in order to find out who will live.

My Rating: Enjoy It (4.5 out of 5). 

2 comments on “Why You Need to Read: “The Memory of Souls”

  1. Thistle & Verse says:

    Enjoyed the review. I probably don’t have the attention span for a series this long. I don’t think I’ve read a series longer than a trilogy since junior high.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. […] #7: A Chorus of Dragons #3: The Memory of Souls by Jenn Lyons […]

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