Why You Need to Read: “Enola Holmes and the Black Barouche”

Enola Holmes, #7: Enola Holmes and the Black Barouche

By: Nancy Springer

Published: August 31, 2021

Genre: Mystery/Historical Fiction/Children’s Fiction

NOTE: This post is part of the Enola Holmes and the Black Barouche Blog Tour hosted by Wednesday Books & Minotaur Books.

…Mycroft came to much the same conclusions I had already reached:

Enola did not need protection.

Enola did not need to go to finishing school.

Nor did Enola need to be married off. Indeed, heaven help any man who might be so unwary as to wed her, (Prologue).

Spinoffs; these are not unknown to anyone who participates in pop culture. In fact, there was a time when the majority of the public were getting annoyed with them. It could be argued that the annoyance came about because some of the spinoffs became too distant from the original series, and it could not stand out on its own. That being said, there have been numerous spinoffs of books, of movies and TV shows, of video games, etc., in which a few of them became just as successful as the original variant. The Enola Holmes series by Nancy Springer is the spinoff series of the Sherlock Holmes books by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle—which, similar to several other readers, I didn’t know this series existed until the movie was released on Netflix—is one of those series. And, if you’ve never heard of this series before now, then know that the latest book in the series—Enola Holmes and the Black Barouche—is a great place to start reading them.

Enola Holmes is 15 years-old and she is the younger sister of Sherlock and Mycroft Holmes. After a series of mischief and misadventures, Enola is settled in her apartment in London and is living independently. When she receives a summons from Dr. Watson about her brother, Sherlock, Enola meets Miss Letitia Glover—who hires Detective Holmes to investigate her twin sister’s, Flossie’s, “death.” Enola and Sherlock go their separate ways to solve the case—using similar methods and techniques. While Enola works on the case alone, she is not without assistance. Enola knows her friend, Viscount Tewkesbury, Marquess of Basilwether a.k.a. “Tewky,” and his family will provide Enola with a “recommendation” upon request. Enola is spirited and versatile with an intellect that rivals her older brothers’. Not to mention, Enola is allowed to be herself during a time when societal norms are restricted in the U.K.

The plot involves the latest case to be presented to Sherlock Holmes. A woman refuses to believe her twin sister is dead. When a letter presents potential proof the sister could still be alive, both Sherlock and Enola take the case together. Sherlock leaves to solve it his way, and Enola leaves to solve it in her way. From here, readers learn how Enola goes about solving mysteries: interviewing witnesses, disguising herself and using an alias, breaking into people’s houses, etc. There are moments when Enola collaborates with Sherlock on both the clues and the facts they collected in order to solve the case. There is one subplot in this novel, and it is about how Enola carries herself during an era when females had limited rights. Enola is able to “behave like a lady” while expressing herself the way she wants to without too much pushback. The plot goes at an appropriate rate and the subplot elevates it. 

The narrative is in 1st person in Enola’s point-of-view and through her stream-of-consciousness as the reader(s) follow Enola’s actions and thoughts. Enola is a reliable character, and one of the reasons for this is because of her vulnerability. Enola is a young woman who lives for herself, but she is humble enough to ask for help from her family and her friends whenever she needs it. The narrative is presented in a way that is can be followed easily. 

The style Nancy Springer uses for her latest Enola Holmes novel is part mystery and part historical fiction. Unlike the original Sherlock Holmes books—which, were written as contemporary stories—Enola Holmes emphasizes the late Victorian Era throughout the narrative. Then mention of clothes and methods of transportation are huge indicators for the readers of this book (series) that the story takes place more than 100 years ago. In addition, this story delves into how women were viewed—and, at times, abused—by the men in society during that time. Although Queen Victoria’s reign was a powerful one, the rest of the females in her Empire were not treated with the same respect. The mood in this novel is concealment. From when the client arrives with her case to Sherlock and Enola, something feels off about it, almost like someone is trying to hide something or someone. The tone revolves around the unraveling of the mystery, which is as jumbled and as questionable as the steps taken for the concealment. It should be mentioned that the book’s cover displays Enola Holmes resembling the actress, Millie Bobby Brown—who portrayed the character in the movie.  

The appeal for Enola Holmes and the Black Barouche will be very high, and not just because of the recent success of the movie—Enola Holmes—on Netflix (I’m guessing the movie is based on the 1st book in the series). The book not only provides a fun mystery story for middle grade readers, but also is an excellent homage to the original Sherlock Holmes books. Fans of mystery—such as myself—will want to consider reading this book and the rest of the series because this spinoff series includes the deductive thinking and logic the infamous Sherlock Holmes is known for, and because all of the known characters from that series—Sherlock Holmes, John Watson, M.D., and Mrs. Hudson—all appear in the story. Since this is a children’s book, it can (and should) be read in schools. Even though I haven’t heard of the series before now, it does have lasting appeal. I should mention that I watched the movie AFTER reading this book, and the pacing and the characters are straight from the page to the screen.

Enola Holmes and the Black Barouche is not only the latest book in a series known to some readers, but also an excellent continuation of a spinoff series with a protagonist who is related to the world’s most famous detective. And, while the narrative presents a darker societal practice, it remains a fun mystery story both for children and for adults. I find it hilarious that Sherlock Holmes has a kid sister who is just like him! I’m looking forward to reading Enola’s next adventure.

My Rating: Enjoy It (4 out of 5). 

Thank you to Wednesday Books, Minotaur Books and Nancy Springer for sending me a print ARC of this book!

Why You Need to Read: “The Gilded Ones”

The Gilded Ones, #1: The Gilded Ones

By: Namina Forna

Published: February 9, 2021

Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy

TRIGGER WARNING: This book contains elements of rape, misogyny, familicide, dismemberment, human trafficking, and violence against females. Be advised.

            Confusion lines my face, and I frown at her. “An invitation for what?”

            “For you, Impure One. Emperor Gezo has decided to create an army of your kind. He invites you to join it and protect our beloved Otera from those that would oppose her will,” (3).

            Readers have become familiar with genre-blending—the blending of at least 2 distinguished genres and/or subgenres within a book or a book series—but, every now and then there are books which are “crossovers” for the audience. For example, consider which books you had to read in secondary school for your literature class. You know many of those books were written for adults, right? And yet, many adolescents have at least 1 book from school that they remembered reading, and some even enjoyed the story. There are several examples of books written for adults that should NOT be read by younger readers—The Nevernight Chronicle by Jay Kristoff—but, there are several young adult books containing numerous adult themes that should be read both by adolescents and by adults as well. The Gilded Ones by Namina Forna is the latest book to tackle how the “adult world” influences the youth negatively and why certain societal practices continue to exist through posterity. 

            The protagonist is Deka. She is 16 years-old and is about to undergo the “Ritual of Purity,” a rite to see if a female’s blood runs red or gold. If a girl’s blood runs red, then she is declared a woman and becomes a member of the village they reside in. Deka has become even more terrified of the Ritual since her mother’s death 3 months earlier; her father is the last family member she has left. However, she has 2 close friends who she envisions remaining close to after she passes the Ritual. Unfortunately, 2 events occur on the day of the Ritual that changes Deka’s life. First, her village is attacked by creatures known as Deathshrieks who kill several people. Second, her blood runs gold—the blood of the Impure—and she is ordered to be “cleanse…” that is until a figure—a woman with white hands—arrives with an offer to reclaim her identity: join the emperor’s army of Impure women to defeat the Deathshrieks for good, or be sentenced to death. Almost immediately, Deka leaves her fanatical village for a chance at “absolution.” Along the way, Deka meets and befriends Britta from the Northern Province. Once at the compound, she meets twin sisters, Adwapa and Asha from the Southern Province; Belcalis from the Western Province; and, Gazal and Jeneba their “Honored Elder or Senior Bloodsisters” who help the girls with their training and to become acclimated with their new life. Then, there is Keita, an uruni—(human) men partnered with each of the girls to work together with (and to spy on) the women as they fight against the Deathshrieks. Last, is White Hands, the Impure woman who brought Deka and Britta to the compound for a chance at absolution; but, she has a close relationship with the Emperor, and she has an interest in Deka, and Deka doesn’t know why. All of these characters help Deka accept her new life and her purpose as she becomes stronger—physically, mentally and emotionally—and determined to protect Otera. 

            The plot of this novel has several parts. First, is Deka’s journey towards absolution after her blood classifies her as a demon. Second, is the explanation of the “Infinite Wisdoms,” the religious mandate practiced in most of the provinces in Otera, which limits the roles of females to their families and their households; but, an army of Impure Ones has existed for some time. Last, is the world-building that occurs throughout the narrative including the various provinces of Otera, the history of Otera—including the goddesses and the Infinite Father. There are 2 subplots in this novel. The first is about the Deathshrieks. What are they? Why have they been attacking villages? Why have their numbers continued to grow? The second subplot is about the “Impure Ones,” or “demons” who are descended from the Gilded Ones—the goddesses who founded Otera. It seems that there are some unknown benefits to being “impure,” which are known by those who are “impure.” In addition, why are all the “Impure Ones” female? What about males? These subplots are essential to the plots as the reader(s) learn more about the characters and the world through them and their conflicts. The plots and the subplots go at an appropriate rate as the story reveals everything that will happen in it.

            The narrative is in 1st person from Deka’s point-of-view. And, the narrative is presented in the present tense. This means that the reader experiences everything and learns about everything through Deka’s P.O.V. and her stream-of-consciousness. Deka’s growth from devout outcast to lead warrior—including some revelations about herself—make her a reliable narrator. A reminder that the narrative is intended for young adult readers, and it can be followed easily by both YA and adult readers. 

            The style Namina Forna uses for The Gilded Ones is NOT new, but it is one of the most candid seen in (YA) literature for some time. The author wanted to examine the idea of the patriarchy—how and why it is practiced—and how religion continues to influence this societal practice. Namina Forna is from Sierra Leone and—when she moved to the U.S.—she saw no difference in the practice of patriarchy between Africa and America. And, given what many of us know about similar practices in the rest of our world (i.e. Asia, the Middle East, etc.), this book is a commentary on how females continue to be treated throughout the world. Feminism and misogyny are international themes and issues that continue to permeate into individuals worldwide. Personally, I believe that one of the reasons “change” and “equality” haven’t happened for women yet is because every region of the world acts like gender equality is “better” where they are; and that is a HUGE lie. Namina Forna presents the harsh reality females—especially young ones—face because some males desire to express their dominance over them. Regardless of age, race, sexuality, gender identity, religion, or ethnicity, this book speaks volumes of what girls and women experience throughout their lives. The mood in this novel is domination. The females are dominated by the males and their religion, even the “Impure Ones” are oppressed by men. The tone in this novel is belligerence. The “Impure Ones” are trained to fight their foes, but are they limited to the Deathshrieks? There is a map of Otera at the front of the book and it should be used by the reader(s) whenever they need to consult it. 

            The appeal for The Gilded Ones have been mostly positive with 75% of the ratings on Goodreads being 4- and 5-stars. One thing that needs to be mentioned is the book’s publication. This book’s release was delayed due to the COVID-19 Pandemic. That being said, the hype surrounding the author’s debut novel made the wait worth it (I read an eARC of this book). This book is described as being for fans of Children of Blood and Bone, Shadow and Bone, Legendborn and Raybearer. I would describe The Gilded Ones as a combination of The Year of the Witching and Speak. Once again, this book is written for YA readers containing “adult” themes they know exist in our world. Not everyone will view this book for what it is, and that’s all right because it means that the book wasn’t written for them. The next book in this series—The Merciless Ones, which releases in April 2022—continues Deka’s journey to discovering her role within the Impure Ones and warring against those who want her dead.

            The Gilded Ones is the book young girls crave and adult women wished they had as children. Namina Forna found a way to present the truth within the fiction for adolescent readers, but made it alluring for adult readers as well. While this book should NOT be read by everyone, it should NOT be missed by anyone. Go and read one of the best (debut) novels of this year!

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!!!

Bookblogger Appreciation Week: Thank You

This past week was Bookblogger Appreciation Week; and, while I participated in this recognition event, I did not know such a thing existed! Not to mention, I did NOT realize how many people read my reviews and my essays on my blog, and my other content (S.F.W.A., podcasts & Fantasy-Faction) elsewhere. We all went through a lot in 2020 and in the 1st half of 2021, and it has been an experience to behold. Now that society reopens on a (somewhat) steady rate, it’s a great feeling knowing that my content continues to be recognized and to be acknowledged by fellow readers and fellow bloggers.

            So, right now, I’m going to say, “Thank You,” to you and to everyone else who have continued supporting me with my blog and my other writings. Especially, during the last 6 months—as I was in my final semester of graduate school, again—as I balanced my life while keeping up with my blog. And, I have an announcement: next week, I will be starting my career as a librarian. I am very excited to start my new job, which may or may not assist with the plans I have for my blog and with my aspirations as a writer. Strangely, I am looking forward to the commute because I can catch up on all of the audiobooks in my library. 

            As 2021 begins to close out, I hope my audience continues to grow both on my channels (will I revive my YouTube channel?), and I want the same thing for my bookblogger friends. Whether or not we communicate through social media, livestreams, and/or in-person events, I am proud to be part of the bookblogging community and how it continues to influence both my writing and my reading. Let’s be honest, if it weren’t for this community, then I would never have considered reading half of the books I’ve read and will read. In addition, I want to say, “Thank You,” to all of the publishers, the authors and their editors, and their marketers for giving me the opportunity to read and to review all of the available books from your companies; and, for being patient with me as I read (or listen) to the books and as I write the reviews for them. 

            I’m going to keep my thankful post short and sweet, but you can read my posts of the past and the future to learn more of my thoughts about everything from books to video games to social issues. Thanks again for your continued support! See you online or at the next book event!

Why You Need to Read: “The House of Always”

A Chorus of Dragons, #4: The House of Always

By: Jenn Lyons                                                                       

Published: May 11, 2021                                                        

Genre: Fantasy                                                                                             

Thank you Tor for sending me an eARC of this book. I listened to excerpts of the audiobook, too.

Note: There are a few spoilers from the first three books in A Chorus of Dragons series. 

            After I have my answers. Time moves differently here. Only seconds will have passed when we return. There’s no need to hurry. There’s no point, (3: Secret Plans, Teraeth’s reaction).

            The beginning of the end has begun in this series. The climax occurred at the end of the last book—The Memory of Souls—yet the consequences of the actions and the choices in the previous chronicle must play out before the story can reach its conclusion. The House of Always is that book in A Chorus of Dragons; and A LOT happens before the story can begin to end. 

            If you believed the Dramatis Personae was long in the previous book, then be ready for even more callbacks in this one. Thanks to Senera, Kihrin D’Mon, Janel Thernanon, Tereath and Thurvishar D’Lorus reunite with Galen and Sheloran D’Mon, Qown, Kalindra Milligreest, Talea, Xivan and Talon. They all “meet up” after the battle that took place in the previous book in order to discuss their recent activities, the latest threat to Quur, and the upcoming threat(s) to the entire world. The last, of course, involves both Relos Var and Vol Karoth; so, what’s the plan? Each character has been busy with their own tasks, then—through magic—they find themselves inside an unusual place where they have a lot of time to sought through all of their thoughts—and those of their adversaries. 

            There are 2 plots in this story, and they involve 2 current conflicts. The first plot involves Kihrin’s “plans” for confronting Vol Karoth, which is easier said than done. The second plot delves into the current threat to Quur, which is something none of the protagonists or the main characters know anything about; or, do they? These plots are linked due to the most obvious reason, that 1 dilemma has to be resolved before the other one can be confronted. Meanwhile, there are several subplots within the story, and they are ALL relevant and essential to the plots of the story. All of the missions, the tasks, and the memories of ALL of the characters are linked to the ongoings throughout the rest of the Quuros Empire and the potential way to save it. 

            Once again, the narrative in this book is different from the narratives in the previous books. That being said, by now readers of this series should be familiar with the author’s narrative style. There are 2 Parts in this book; and, while the 1st 2 chapters in Part I and all of Part II are told in the present, the remainder of the narrative jumps back-and-forth amongst memories, flashbacks, previous lives, and streams-of-consciousness of ALL of the characters! In fact, a handful of other characters reemerge in this book. Which ones, and why? There are numerous P.O.V. chapters and passages which follows ALL of the characters. However, Kihrin’s point-of-view is the only one told in 1st person. The rest of the characters’ P.O.V.s are in 3rd person limited. There is a reason for this narration, and it is presented as it progresses. This narrative style allows for further development of the plots, the characters, and the world-building. And, believe it or not, the characters are reliable narrators, and their narratives can be followed easily. 

            The style Jenn Lyons uses for The House of Always can be argued as it being an additional buildup before the finale in the last book in this series. The final battle in the war is approaching, and the Dramatis Personae must decide which side they are on. Unfortunately, neutrality is no longer an option, so a decision has to be made. Not to mention, “the plan” must be finalized and agreed upon by EVERYONE. The style presented by the author reminds the readers what is at stake as the series approaches its end. The mood in this novel is ominous. All of the characters know what’s coming, and they must remain vigilant—which is the tone in this novel—as the final battle draws near. Once again, the readers can refer to the maps, the glossary, and the appendices for whenever they need to consult any information.     

            The appeal for The House of Always have been positive. Readers and fans who read through this book in the series gave it high ratings (4- & 5-stars). This is the book in which all of the pieces and the subplots from the previous books reemerge in this one, right before the series reaches its dénouement. This epic fantasy series continues to be compared to ones written by George R.R. Martin, Brandon Sanderson, and other authors who write similar books in this subgenre. To fantasy fans and readers who are still indecisive on whether or not to read this series, DO IT! If you’re worried about remembering all of the characters, then know that their stories continue throughout the series. If you’re concerned about all of the plots and the subplots, then take notes (I do). If you’re worried about forgetting what happens in all of the books leading up to the last book in the series—The Discord of Gods—then, now is the time either to re-read the previous books in the series, or to join (or to create) a group for a read along of this series! You are running out of reasons for NOT reading this series!

            The House of Always is a unique story that gears up readers for the series’ conclusion. You might wonder as to whether or not the narrative style leads to an essential part of the plot, and it does that and so much more. All of the elements within this series begins to end as the story and the characters’ fates gets closer to it. Now, we must wait until 2022 to learn who survives the apocalypse. 

My Rating: Enjoy It (4.5 out of 5).