Why You Need to Read: “Enola Holmes and the Black Barouche”

Enola Holmes, #7: Enola Holmes and the Black Barouche

By: Nancy Springer

Published: August 31, 2021

Genre: Mystery/Historical Fiction/Children’s Fiction

NOTE: This post is part of the Enola Holmes and the Black Barouche Blog Tour hosted by Wednesday Books & Minotaur Books.

…Mycroft came to much the same conclusions I had already reached:

Enola did not need protection.

Enola did not need to go to finishing school.

Nor did Enola need to be married off. Indeed, heaven help any man who might be so unwary as to wed her, (Prologue).

Spinoffs; these are not unknown to anyone who participates in pop culture. In fact, there was a time when the majority of the public were getting annoyed with them. It could be argued that the annoyance came about because some of the spinoffs became too distant from the original series, and it could not stand out on its own. That being said, there have been numerous spinoffs of books, of movies and TV shows, of video games, etc., in which a few of them became just as successful as the original variant. The Enola Holmes series by Nancy Springer is the spinoff series of the Sherlock Holmes books by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle—which, similar to several other readers, I didn’t know this series existed until the movie was released on Netflix—is one of those series. And, if you’ve never heard of this series before now, then know that the latest book in the series—Enola Holmes and the Black Barouche—is a great place to start reading them.

Enola Holmes is 15 years-old and she is the younger sister of Sherlock and Mycroft Holmes. After a series of mischief and misadventures, Enola is settled in her apartment in London and is living independently. When she receives a summons from Dr. Watson about her brother, Sherlock, Enola meets Miss Letitia Glover—who hires Detective Holmes to investigate her twin sister’s, Flossie’s, “death.” Enola and Sherlock go their separate ways to solve the case—using similar methods and techniques. While Enola works on the case alone, she is not without assistance. Enola knows her friend, Viscount Tewkesbury, Marquess of Basilwether a.k.a. “Tewky,” and his family will provide Enola with a “recommendation” upon request. Enola is spirited and versatile with an intellect that rivals her older brothers’. Not to mention, Enola is allowed to be herself during a time when societal norms are restricted in the U.K.

The plot involves the latest case to be presented to Sherlock Holmes. A woman refuses to believe her twin sister is dead. When a letter presents potential proof the sister could still be alive, both Sherlock and Enola take the case together. Sherlock leaves to solve it his way, and Enola leaves to solve it in her way. From here, readers learn how Enola goes about solving mysteries: interviewing witnesses, disguising herself and using an alias, breaking into people’s houses, etc. There are moments when Enola collaborates with Sherlock on both the clues and the facts they collected in order to solve the case. There is one subplot in this novel, and it is about how Enola carries herself during an era when females had limited rights. Enola is able to “behave like a lady” while expressing herself the way she wants to without too much pushback. The plot goes at an appropriate rate and the subplot elevates it. 

The narrative is in 1st person in Enola’s point-of-view and through her stream-of-consciousness as the reader(s) follow Enola’s actions and thoughts. Enola is a reliable character, and one of the reasons for this is because of her vulnerability. Enola is a young woman who lives for herself, but she is humble enough to ask for help from her family and her friends whenever she needs it. The narrative is presented in a way that is can be followed easily. 

The style Nancy Springer uses for her latest Enola Holmes novel is part mystery and part historical fiction. Unlike the original Sherlock Holmes books—which, were written as contemporary stories—Enola Holmes emphasizes the late Victorian Era throughout the narrative. Then mention of clothes and methods of transportation are huge indicators for the readers of this book (series) that the story takes place more than 100 years ago. In addition, this story delves into how women were viewed—and, at times, abused—by the men in society during that time. Although Queen Victoria’s reign was a powerful one, the rest of the females in her Empire were not treated with the same respect. The mood in this novel is concealment. From when the client arrives with her case to Sherlock and Enola, something feels off about it, almost like someone is trying to hide something or someone. The tone revolves around the unraveling of the mystery, which is as jumbled and as questionable as the steps taken for the concealment. It should be mentioned that the book’s cover displays Enola Holmes resembling the actress, Millie Bobby Brown—who portrayed the character in the movie.  

The appeal for Enola Holmes and the Black Barouche will be very high, and not just because of the recent success of the movie—Enola Holmes—on Netflix (I’m guessing the movie is based on the 1st book in the series). The book not only provides a fun mystery story for middle grade readers, but also is an excellent homage to the original Sherlock Holmes books. Fans of mystery—such as myself—will want to consider reading this book and the rest of the series because this spinoff series includes the deductive thinking and logic the infamous Sherlock Holmes is known for, and because all of the known characters from that series—Sherlock Holmes, John Watson, M.D., and Mrs. Hudson—all appear in the story. Since this is a children’s book, it can (and should) be read in schools. Even though I haven’t heard of the series before now, it does have lasting appeal. I should mention that I watched the movie AFTER reading this book, and the pacing and the characters are straight from the page to the screen.

Enola Holmes and the Black Barouche is not only the latest book in a series known to some readers, but also an excellent continuation of a spinoff series with a protagonist who is related to the world’s most famous detective. And, while the narrative presents a darker societal practice, it remains a fun mystery story both for children and for adults. I find it hilarious that Sherlock Holmes has a kid sister who is just like him! I’m looking forward to reading Enola’s next adventure.

My Rating: Enjoy It (4 out of 5). 

Thank you to Wednesday Books, Minotaur Books and Nancy Springer for sending me a print ARC of this book!

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