Why You Need to Read: “Grey Sister”

Book of the Ancestor: Book Two: Grey Sister

By: Mark Lawrence

Published: April 3, 2018

Genre: Fantasy, Grimdark, Sequel

            “You’re powerful Nona, and you’ve come into your power at an early age. The understanding that power corrupts is an idea older than the language we repeat it in. All of us in positions that afford authority over others are susceptible, be we high priests, prime instigators, even abbesses.”

            “Or emperors,” Nona said.

            The abbess winced. “Some truths are better left implied, dear,” (Chapter 17).

            Sequels and other follow ups to their predecessors work well when the events that occurred beforehand are addressed AND the action picks up where it left off. In addition, both the plot development and the character development must continue to show growth in order for the story to remain realistic, and to keep the attention of the reader(s). Mark Lawrence achieves all of this in Grey Sister, the Second Book of the Ancestor.

            The second book in the trilogy has two protagonists: Nona Grey, who is now around 14 years-old and just reached Mystic Class; and Abbess Glass, the Reverend Mother and Headmistress at the Convent of Sweet Mercy. From these protagonists, readers are able to gain knowledge of the on goings of everything happening at the Convent. Nona is coming into her powers and her abilities and is dealing with the consequences of her actions from her time in Grey Class. At the same time, Abbess Glass continues her task of running the Convent and continuing her task of exposing corruption inside and outside of the Convent. More is at stake for both female protagonists as both the Emperor and the Inquisition continue to meddle in the affairs of the Church. All of the other novices: Ara, Darla, Ruli, Jula, and Zole, and the nuns: Wheel, Apple, Kettle, Pan, Rose, Tallow, and Rail know that more is happening outside of the Convent than the Emperor is willing to admit. And, once again, Nona meets up with a few of her former “cage mates,” who have grown into their abilities as well. Everyone is preparing for a war that is inevitable. Nona must endure the obstacles and the hardships in order to graduate from Mystic Class. Abbess Glass must use all of her wisdom and her connections to keep everyone safe, including the “Chosen One” and her “Shield.”

            The plot for Grey Sister is a continuation from Red Sister. Nona and her friends and classmates continue with their classes and the nuns continue their work inside and outside of the Convent. All of this occurs after the betrayals and the heartbreaks from the last two years. These events prompt the identity of the “Chosen One” to be revealed, which brings a motley crowd of zealots and doubters alike. At the same time, neither the noble families, nor the nuns have forgotten the efforts of one noble family’s continued plans to kill Nona. Nona is struggling with her classes due to the long-term “consequence” of the attack on her life. Through it all, Nona grows stronger and more powerful to the delight of her peers and to the horror of her enemies. If Nona wishes to remain at the Convent of Sweet Mercy and to stay alive, then she must find a way to navigate herself through her trials. The subplot of the “Chosen One” is growing and merging into the plot of Nona’s education and the significance of the 4 tribes that traveled to Abeth.

            Once again, the narrative is limited omniscient narration, meaning the readers and the protagonists know what is being experienced at that moment through the character’s point-of-view. Unlike Red Sister, the narrative in Grey Sister is told in real-time through the P.O.V.s of both Nona and Abbess Glass. Thus, these stream-of-consciousness narrations are reliable and can be followed by readers easily. It should be mentioned that the present narration of Grey Sister starts with Chapter 2. Chapter 1 picks up with the cliffhanger from Red Sister, and the Prologue provides a continuation of the action first introduced in the Prologue in Red Sister. Since Grey Sister’s narration is told in the present, any events of the past that is mentioned proves to be a revelation to both the characters and the readers. This is because what gets revealed demonstrates that everything that is, has been, and will continue to happen is bigger and more grievous than anyone at the Convent of Sweet Mercy could imagine. 

            The style Mark Lawrence uses in Grey Sister is a continuation of how prophecy is exploited through means of distraction. Those involved directly with the prophecy want nothing more than to be left alone and to live their lives as “normal” individuals. Some hopefuls wish for the “divine” powers of the “Chosen One” to work miracles for them only to be left disappointed with this notion. Then, there are those who use the prophecy as a way to fulfill their agendas, typically political ones. And, if the prophecy of the “Chosen One” is a distraction, then the political agendas of several noble families, including the Royal Family, serves as the knowledge that no one wants to admit is the issue: war is coming. In other words, religion is exploited in order to distract everyone from the politics of society. This is the mood found within Grey Sister; and, the tone is how the truth—surrounding both religion and politics—is revealed and the reactions and the consequences of it. There are neither winners, nor losers, yet everyone continues to believe whatever they want to believe in. 

            The appeal of Grey Sister is as positive as Red Sister. Fans of the first book had just as many praises for its sequel. This is because the sequel continues to build and to develop the characters, the plot, the world-building, and the action. Not only will readers want to re-read this book (to search for clues and Easter Eggs), but also to continue recommending this series to other readers, all while waiting to read Holy Sister, the third and final book in the series. 

            Grey Sister is an amazing sequel to Red Sister. This is because there is an expansion of the world and further development of both the plot and the characters. At the same time, the events and the revelations from the first book play a critical role that cannot be overlooked. The story is as immersive as the action is entertaining. Mark Lawrence’s novel is a must-read for fans of both fantasy and grimdark.

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!

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Why You Need to Read: “Red Sister”

Book of the Ancestor: Book One: Red Sister

By: Mark Lawrence

Published: April 4, 2017

Genre: Fantasy, Grimdark

            A small thing in shapeless linen—not street rags, covered in rusty stains, but a serf’s wear none the less. She might be nine…This girl was a fierce creature, a scowl on her thin dirty face. Eyes black below a short shock of ebony hair, (Chapter 2).

            There is no doubt in my mind (or anyone else’s) that Mark Lawrence is one of the most popular fantasy authors in the world right now. Whether or not it’s Lawrence’s SPFBO Contest on his website, his latest novellas advertised on Amazon, or his popular novels, more and more readers are reading his books. I’ll be talking about his latest trilogy about a convent that teaches girls how to kill and to use magic. Red Sister is the first book in the Book of the Ancestor Trilogy. 

            The story follows Nona Grey, our protagonist, from the moment she is given to a child-seller—Giljohn, through the first few years—ages 9 to 13—of her education at the Convent of Sweet Mercy where she learns more about the abilities she’s been trying to hide from other people. Other characters include her classmates: Clera, Ara, Hessa, Jula, and Ruli; her instructors: Sisters Glass, Rose, Wheel, Apple, Pan, Rule, and Tallow; and other characters who interact with Nona including Raymel Tacsis, the man Nona almost killed. All of these characters are tied to Nona’s education and potential involvement surrounding the “Chosen One” prophecy. Unfortunately, Nona has to learn how to defend herself from the nobles who want her dead for attacking a nobleman in self-defense. Nona’s development goes from her being a poor illiterate child to a novice at the Convent to one of the “candidates” who could be the “Chosen One,” and saving the world. Throughout her early education, Nona learns who to trust and who to stay away from, and nothing is what it seems.

            The plot of Red Sister is Nona’s education at the Convent of Sweet Mercy as well as learning about the abilities she has within herself. In the world of Abeth, four tribes with remarkable traits settled and intermarried with non-magical humans. Centuries later, their descendants can have the traits of Gerant (great size), Hunska (speed and agility), Marjal (elemental magic), and/or Quantal (walkers of the Path and users of greater magic). While it is rare for anyone to have one of these traits, it is believed that one day a “Chosen One,” an individual with all four traits, will appear and save the world from ice and darkness. Nona is one of those who is suspected of being the “Chosen One.” This notion is slammed by many people at the Convent, including Nona herself. However, this subplot is essential to Nona’s character development as she demonstrates her abilities to her instructors because there are many who believe that the “Chosen One” is one of the girls at the Convent of Sweet Mercy. It is obvious that this subplot will become the plot in the later books, but for now, Nona’s education and discovery about herself is the plot in this book. Her interactions with everyone at the Convent who believes, or encourages, the “Chosen One” prophecy is essential to both the plot development and the development of all of the characters. 

            The narrative in Red Sister is limited omniscient narration. Readers get the point-of-view of Nona and a few other characters throughout the story, some of which are told in flashback. In fact, Nona’s first P.O.V. chapter isn’t until chapter 3 and it begins with a flashback. These multiple points-of-view allows for a swifter narration of the story. In the first two chapters (not including the Prologue), readers learn that Nona is about to be executed for attacking a nobleman who attacked Nona’s friend—who is executed before Nona. The very next chapter is the discussion of who gets “custody” of Nona: Partniss Reeve—the owner of fighters who bought Nona from Giljohn, and Sister Glass—the Abbess of Sweet Mercy—who has her own reasons for wanting Nona. Nona leaves with Abbess Glass knowing, at 9 years-old, to expect retaliation from the family of the man she attacked. Another chapter is told in flashback from the P.O.V. of one of Nona’s classmates, and there are several parts of the story that follows a few of the Sisters from the Convent. It does get confusing at times, but this narration helps with Nona’s character development from how Nona sees herself and everyone else, to knowing everyone else’s opinions about Nona. This is an interesting narration because it seems that how Nona sees herself is on par with how everyone else sees her. 

            The way Mark Lawrence wrote Red Sister is a change in direction fantasy readers have become used to: a prophecy is made, the one who fits the prophecy arrives and works with others in order to fulfill it. Only, the author decided to play with that concept and the expectations surrounding prophecy. Repeating ideas used by both J.K. Rowling and George R.R. Martin, Mark Lawrence demonstrates how prophecy can exploit and can harm several people with a (potential) notion that it will all be worth it once the world is safe again. The tone of this book is focuses on the hows and the whys prophecies come about and how more harm can and does come from them before they are fulfilled. Harry Potter’s life was altered because of a prophecy, and several characters throughout Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fireseries are affected by prophecy and suffer because of it. However, will the “prophecy” about the “Chosen One” come to fulfillment in Lawrence’s story? Some characters say, “yes” and many more say, “no.” The mood throughout this novel is how each character feels about the prophecy surrounding the “Chosen One.” And, it seems many of them find the prophecy more of a burden than a blessing. Maybe that’s what Lawrence’s style is supposed to present to readers, witnessing a “prophecy” come true and how everyone involved would react to it. 

            The appeal surrounding Red Sister have been immensely positive worldwide. Presenting a world in which privilege has more power over those with power, as well as a convent with killer nuns makes this novel a must read for all fantasy fans. I kept hearing about this trilogy from other fantasy readers who swore that it was worth reading. Fans of both Tamora Pierce and Robin Hobb will enjoy this series the most. Fans of George R.R. Martin will appreciate the influence and the Easter Eggs found throughout the book. Red Sister covers the first half of Nona’s education at the Convent and the buildup surrounding both the prophecy and Nona’s past. This makes the next book in the trilogy, Grey Sister, a must read for anyone who craves to know what happens next. I am one of those readers, and I can say that Red Sister is a must read for all fantasy fans.

            Red Sister is a novel that made its way from my TBR list to my Read list. Just like The Name of the Wind, Red Sister is a fun and a fast read that presents all sides of the protagonist to the other characters (and to the readers). The realism presented within this story is one of the many reasons why I enjoyed Red Sister so much. Nona is a well-developed character who knows what she is to those involved in her life and it makes you want to keep reading to know what happens to her next. It’s why I’m already reading Grey Sister and Holy Sister afterwards. Even if you’re not a fan of fantasy, Red Sister’s focus on the characters and their personalities is enough of a reason to start reading this book.

My rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!

The Bittersweet Conclusions that are Coming in April 2019

Note: There are some spoilers and theories surrounding Game of Thronesand the MCU. I don’t have any knowledge of what’s going to happen in either Game of Thronesor Endgame.

Just like everyone else, I’m excited for both Season 8 of Game of Thrones and Avengers: Endgame. Both the television show and the movie are continuations of popular media adaptations of speculative fiction. Each one will pick up after a “shocking” ending, and the fandom has no idea what to expect in these upcoming installments. George R.R. Martin has announced that there will be differences in his final two books from the TV show. Marvel and Disney have announced some of the upcoming movies for “Phase Four” of the Marvel Cinematic Universe—Spider-Man: Far From Home and maybe an appearance of the Defenders (?). So yes, no one knows what to expect in April 2019 except for action and heartache. 

            Before I go into the obvious differences here are the similarities. Both Game of Thronesand Endgamewill take place after the characters suffer a major lost and are working to fight and to survive in the final showdown. Both involve forces in which there is little to no knowledge about. And, both have confirmed deaths of many of its characters. How will The North win against The Night King? What methods will be used to defeat Thanos and return the other half of the universe’s population? Who is going to die, because not everyone makes it to the end? Fans of either or both are anticipating finales that will destroy them emotionally. The actors and the actresses did admit to crying at the end of shooting their parts. Will it be the same for us? 

            Game of ThronesSeason 8 promises us epic battle sequences, lots of CGI, and several deaths. George R.R. Martin has told his readers to expect a “bittersweet” ending in the books, which should be reflected in the show. And, because the show has diverted from the books so much, it will be difficult to determine which of the minor characters are going to die. In terms of the major characters, Jamie and Cersei are definitely going to die; at least one more Stark will die; and, Winterfell will provide a winning strategy for surviving—and hopefully winning—the war. As for the minor characters, anyone is fair game. Although we didn’t see any footage in the trailer, the Battle for King’s Landing is going to be as epic as the Battle for the Dawn. 

            Less than two weeks after the premiere of the final season of Game of ThronesAvengers: Endgamewill be released in theaters. This latest entry in the Marvel Cinematic Universe takes place a few months after Thanos snapped his fingers. The surviving teammates are scattered and are brainstorming on how to defeat Thanos. There isn’t much to go on except that there will be a final showdown of some sort; Captain Marvel will make her appearance to both the Avengers and the Guardians of the Galaxy; and, at least one of the remaining Avengers—Captain America—will die. Thus, paving the way for Civil War II—read the graphic novel. However, it has already been confirmed that the characters who died before the “Snap” will remain dead (?). This plot device is there to implicate lasting repercussions to Thanos’ actions.

            April 2019 will give us the conclusions to the media storylines we want so badly, or do we? All we know about the anticipated features is that there will be a bittersweet ending to both of them. And yes, there have been clues in the previous seasons and movies, it is not clear what will happen. Unfortunately, the books don’t give us any additional hints. With human history to accompany us, viewers and fans should have an idea of how gut-wrenching these viewing experiences will be.

            I know I’ll be watching both media adaptions of these franchises; and yes, I’ll continue to read and to watch anything else related to them. But, am I prepared for the emotional train wreck that is part of these endgames? If the actors and the actresses were emotional, then what does that mean for us? All the same, I need to quench my curiosity because the buildup has been too much. I Need to Know How It All Ends!

My Theory on George R.R. Martin’s Writing “Plan” for A Song of Ice and Fire

What do you believe is going on with George R.R. Martin’s writing process?

Like many other fans and readers of A Song of Ice and Fire series, we have been waiting for a very long time for Winds of Winter. A Dance with Dragons was published in 2011, a few weeks after the first season of Game of Thrones ended. Now, the eighth and final season is being filmed, and there is still no word on the progress of Winds of Winter. The last rumor that many fans believed was that several preview chapters were pulled from the Internet for editing. Now, with the television adaptation diverging beyond the books, the only thing many of us are hoping for is that the books will continue its own narrative, and not reiterate what was changed for television too much.

Now, while I’m sure Reddit and Tower of the Hand have several theories and ideas about when Winds of Winter is going to be announced/published, and whether or not there will be three more books instead of two, this is my theory based on what other authors have said and done in similar scenarios, and G.R.R.M.’s writing style. However, I’m not familiar with all of those theories. I hear some of them when I participate in live chats on YouTube. And, for the record, I have made a similar theory/prediction in the past. I was one of a few who brought up and defended the theory surrounding the potential release date for the novel, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, on 07/07/2007. As some of us may or may not remember, J.K. Rowling herself had to reject that theory.

While it has been over seven years since the fifth book in the A Song of Ice and Fire series was published, fans continue to enjoy the TV show, novellas, graphic novel adaptations, and fan chats surrounding the series. However, we remain curious as to when Winds of Winter will be released. I don’t believe there will be an additional book in the series. I believe we will get two very long novels to end it. I don’t believe George R.R. Martin will “pull a Robert Jordan (R.I.P.).” There is a children’s fantasy author and folklorist by the name of Alan Garner who released the final book in the Weirdstone trilogy, Boneland, 49 years after the release of the second novel! I doubt we’ll have to wait that long!

My theory might not be original, and many of you might want to disprove this idea immediately, but hear me out. I believe George R.R. Martin is writing both Winds of Winter and A Dream of Spring, consecutively. In other words, G.R.R.M. is writing both books as one long narrative. Remember the “split” that was A Feast for Crows and A Dance with Dragons? Maybe, G.R.R.M. is writing nonstop and without considering an “end” of one novel and a “start” of the other novel. This method of writing could prevent a longer wait period between the two novels. Also, George would not be the first author to write a long epic as “one piece.” For example, J.R.R. Tolkien wrote The Lord of the Rings as a single text. The novel was split because of the paper shortage at the end of World War II.

Why would I come up with a theory such as this? It is because of what George said about the end of his series, the “final showdown” will start in Winds of Winter and carry over into A Dream of Spring. Too much will be occurring for it to be saved for the last book. Not that I’m trying to guess the potential ending in Winds of Winter, but I believe it’s safe to say that the climax happened in A Dance with Dragons, and the falling action will be taking place starting from Winds of Winter until the “resolution” at the end of A Dream of Spring. We, as readers, might get so caught up with the action within Winds of Winter that we won’t even realize that we’ve reached the end of the novel until the end of the novel. We can only wait.

So, what does my theory about G.R.R.M.’s writing process have to do with the last two books in the series? I believe that if George is writing both novels consecutively, then there is a chance that the wait period between Winds of Winter and A Dream of Spring will be short(er). That being said, George also said that there would be three more novellas in the Dunk and Egg series. Many of us readers know that there are hints and ties between these two series. I’m not saying that we will get all of these stories within consecutive years, but I doubt that we will have to wait five years or more in between the two novels. Maybe we’ll get an announcement after the final season of Game of Thrones premieres or ends? We can only wait.

A Look Into: America’s Top 10 Books Based on “The Great American Read”

Tonight, Tuesday, October 23, 2018, PBS will announce, based on votes, which book is “America’s Best-Loved Book.” The series and the vote were announced last spring, and the last few weeks have given viewers and readers a brief in-depth look into each book. The 100 books were categorized based on theme, not genre, which makes it for a more relevant look into the books. Now, PBS has reached the end of the series, viewers have reached the end of voting, and American readers will know which book was selected as “America’s Best-Loved Book.”

Twelve days ago, the Top 10 Books, based on voting were announced. Here they are, not listed by vote rank:

Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White                       Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell         The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis        Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë                         Harry Potter (series) by J.K. Rowling           Little Women by Louisa May Alcott                    The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien        Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen       Outlander (series) by Diana Gabaldon        To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Take a look at the way I listed PBS’ Top 10 Books. Have you noticed anything? The column to the left has a list of books that can be categorized under the “fantasy” genre; and, the column to the right has a list of books that can be categorized as “historical” fiction. What does this say about America’s taste in literature? What does it say about the notions surrounding fantasy literature?

First, the historical fiction books; two novels take place (before,) during (and after) the American Civil War, two novels are about society in England during the 1800s, and one novel is about segregation in the United States during The Great Depression. All of these novels give readers insight into the social dissonance occurring during certain moments in human history. People have either read one or more of these books for school, or saw the film adaptation at some point in the lives. Their stories are familiar by all, and well loved by readers.

Now, for the fantasy books, all of which have at least one media adaptation whether or not it’s movie or television. Lewis, Tolkien and Rowling are from Britain, and E.B. White—not to be confused with T.H. White, author of The Once and Future King—and Diana Gabaldon are from the United States. Each of these fantasy novels (and series) falls under different subgenres. Charlotte’s Web and The Chronicles of Narnia are for children and have talking animals, which comes from Aesop’s Fables; Harry Potter is a bildungsroman series that follows Harry Potter and his friends and schoolmates as they learn about magic and prepare to fight against the evil wizard, Lord Voldemort; and, The Lord of the Rings and Outlander are fantasy novels that make up a larger compendium of books set in the world the characters reside in, Middle-earth and 18th Century Scotland, respectively.

It’s interesting how fantasy fiction is beloved enough to keep the genre growing and going. Fantasy and fairy stories are not only for children—read Tolkien’s essay, On Fairy Stories—but also they are not enjoyed by all children. Children who grew up reading fantasy and fairy tales grow up and write stories of the same genre as adults. And, some of those stories are for adult readers. The author determines the audience whom his/her/their story is read; and yet, two of the fantasy books in the Top 10 are fantasy stories for adults. The Lord of the Rings takes place in a fantasy world, and in Outlander, the protagonist time travels to the past by means of supernatural elements.

Fantasy has been an established literary genre since the publication of both The Chronicles of Narnia (1950) and The Lord of the Rings (1954). Lewis and Tolkien are recognized as being two of the authors who helped solidify the genre. Lewis Carroll and L. Frank Baum wrote Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (1865) and Through the Looking Glass (1871), and The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) and its sequels, respectively, which were a few of the early fantasy books in which the fantasy genre emerged. All of the mentioned books were popular enough for media adaptations, and those films brought more attention to the books. Harry Potter brought fantasy to a towering level that no one saw coming. Fantasy literature is an established, recognized, and read genre. Hence, the books that made it into “The Great American Read” Top 10 List.

Do I believe any of the fantasy novels in the Top 10 will be chosen as “America’s Best-Loved Book”? No, I do not, but not due to the reason you may or may not believe. While I am an enthusiastic reader of the fantasy (and other speculative fiction) genre, I—like everyone else—had to read certain books as a student in grade school and in college. And, I enjoyed reading some of those books for my English classes. I was able to relate to the characters and comprehend the social issues mentioned throughout each novel. Some of the themes found in those novels still resonate in today’s society. I’m not saying that that isn’t the case with the fantasy books in the Top 10, but one novel calls out “America” to me whenever I think about the title. And, that book is To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee.

First published in 1960, during the American Civil Rights Movement, To Kill a Mockingbird follows Scout and her family who are living in Alabama during The Great Depression. This coming-of-age novel illustrates the loss of innocence Scout and her brother, Jem, experience when their father, Atticus—a lawyer, defends a disabled black man accused of raping a white woman. This Pulitzer Prize winning novel has been said to be a literary response to the murder of Emmett Till, a 14 year-old boy from Chicago who was brutally lynched after being accused of whistling at a white woman while visiting relatives in Mississippi on August 28, 1955. Emmett Till’s murder sparked outrage nationwide, and was the event that would eventually lead to the start Civil Rights Movement.

Over 60 years later, To Kill a Mockingbird remains on school reading lists and is listed as an “American Classic.” Personally, I believe this novel has just as many life lessons and memorable characters such as Aslan from Narnia, Gandalf from Middle-earth, Professor Dumbledore from Hogwarts, and Charlotte from Zuckerman’s Farm. As someone who grew up during the publication of the Harry Potter books while old enough to read To Kill a Mockingbird, I found the former books to be enjoyable and the latter book to be more thought provoking as I continue living in a changing United States.

Harper Lee does not shy away from the issues of race and class in her novel. In addition, she was not afraid of including the harsh reality of life that her child characters had to witness and to endure. To Kill a Mockingbird continues to teach readers of all ages that judging people based on their traits and not their appearances or their living situation is essential to being a good person. Yes, there are people who harm the innocent and get away with it, but treating people the way they deserve to be treated—with respect—goes a long way.

PBS’ “The Great American Read” allowed denizens in the U.S. to review what many people read and enjoy. The great thing about the special was that all genres of literature were considered. Furthermore, the special gave insight into which books, many which remain on school reading lists, are and remain popular by readers and non-readers alike.

In Defense of George R.R. Martin’s Fire & Blood Release

Recently, George R.R. Martin announced his upcoming text in his Westeros world, and it’s NOT Winds of Winter. Instead, fans will buy (you know you will) and will read Fire & Blood, a “history of the Targaryens as kings (and queens) in Westeros—from Aegon I, the Conqueror, to the regency (not rule) of Aegon III, the Dragonbane.” This insight into the Targaryens will be an entertaining and an interesting read. And, this is only the first volume in this series!

And yet, several fans are annoyed, again, that this upcoming release is NOT Winds of Winter. I have mentioned my beliefs surrounding the publication and the release of Winds of Winter (read that post), and I don’t mind waiting a bit longer for a good story. I believe we’re missing the silver lining of the announcement. George R.R. Martin said in his blog “…there are dragons too. LOTS of dragons.” His “imaginary history” will give us a look into the dragons and their behaviors and their characteristics, and how the dragon lords tamed them. You know what has NOT been mentioned in any of George R.R. Martin’s other stories from Westeros, other dragons. Both A Song of Ice and Fire and A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms take place after the death of the last dragon. Readers will get some insight into how the dragons were tamed by the Targaryens. In addition, according to Tor.com, we could get some questions answered about the dragons. Personally, I’ve been wondering where Daenerys’ dragon eggs came from. I have some theories, but that’s for another time.

I want Winds of Winter as much as you do, but, similar to Harry Potter and Mistborn, I am willing to wait longer for a good story over a rushed one. Also, since this upcoming text takes place within Westeros history, we could learn more of what could happen in Winds of Winter. The first half of A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms has given us a look into how the Targaryens ruled the Seven—yes, all 7—Kingdoms, the Blackfyres are mentioned, and Bloodraven demonstrates how good of a Hand he was for the Targaryens. All of these names are mentioned throughout A Song of Ice and Fire series. We still don’t know a lot about dragons, so there should be some useful information about them, hopefully.

Fire & Blood is 640 pages with “more than 75 black and white illustrations” (http://georgerrmartin.com/notablog/2018/04/25/fire-blood-on-the-way/). That’s a lot of content surrounding the Targaryens, and their dragons. We could learn more about the Targaryen Valyrian swords: Blackfyre and Dark Sister, or whether or not this is the “book” Jaqen H’ghar is looking for in the Citadel. This book will be a plethora of information for the last two books of A Song of Ice and Fire.

Unfortunately, we won’t get Volume II until after A Dream of Spring is released. And, yes, I know that could be years from now, but George R.R. Martin cannot give us spoilers about Aegon IV, the Unworthy, and the Blackfyres before we find out what happens to the Others! So, while I (continue) to wait for Winds of Winter, I will be reading, analyzing, and theorizing about the Targaryens, and their dragons along with the rest of you!

What do you think about this upcoming “imaginary history”?

Poll & Theory: What is Jon Snow’s Actual Name?

PLEASE NOTE: The following contains spoilers for both HBO’s Game of Thrones series and George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire series. If you have neither read, nor watched, then you have been warned.

I want to thank Rawrist, AltShiftX, Radio Westeros, The World of Ice & Fire, apoiaf, Winter-Is-Coming.net, GOT_Academy, and Thrones Amino for the information and the their insight into everything Westeros. And, thanks to all my followers and fans for continuing to read my blogs regardless of my work schedule. Thank you for all your support.

POLL: What is Jon Snow’s Actual Name?

Fans of both Game of Thrones and A Song of Ice and Fire now know that Jon Snow is not the son of Eddard Stark, but of Prince Rhaegar Targaryen and Lyanna Stark. That being said—we know the use of Jon Snow for “John Doe”—what was Jon Snow’s name supposed to be? You know Rhaegar and Lyanna discussed it. Yet, because Rhaegar was naming his children after his conquering ancestors, we can all agree that if Jon was born a girl, her name would have been Visenya. Obviously, Jon is male, so is his name Viserys, like his uncle and other ancestors? Or, was another name considered?

For the record, I do believe that Lyanna and Rhaegar were married (Ned Stark’s thoughts about Rhaegar NOT having any bastards is a huge hint). The surname Targaryen will be used throughout this theory.

Viserys

WHY- Rhaegar was naming his children after Aegon the Conqueror and his sisters, Rhaenys and Visenya. He already has a son named Aegon and a daughter names Rhaenys. And, Viserys is the masculine variant of Viserys. This is makes a lot of sense.

WHY NOT- Given the fact that Rhaegar was knowledgeable about the history of his family’s dynasty and that he and his father, King Aerys II—the Mad King, did not have a good relationship, both men having sons named Viserys would have led into another Targaryen civil war. Only this time, it would be two Viserys warring in place of two Aegons.

Brandon

WHY- Lyanna is a Stark and Brandon is a family name.

WHY NOT- Lyanna (probably) is married to Rhaegar so her children would be Targaryens. It would not make sense to given a Northern name to a Targaryen prince.

Aemon

WHY- Maester Aemon (Targaryen) was Rhaeger’s role model and the two wrote to each other frequently. Maester Aemon was familiar with “the Prince that was Promised” prophecy. Also, he serves in the Night’s Watch, which is highly acclaimed by both the North and the Targaryen dynasty. Naming Jon after a Targaryen who served in the Night’s Watch would make sense.

– Aemon, the Dragonknight, Targaryen was the younger brother of King Aegon IV, the Unworthy, the worst Targaryen king. The Dargonknight is one of the most celebrated members of the Kingsguard. While Aegon indulged himself and dishonored his sister-wife, Naerys, Aemon performed deeds reflecting his vows as a knight and a Kingsguard. The Dragonknight was also a very puissant warrior. If Rhaegar were to have a son who would go on to save the world, then Aemon would be a great choice for a name.

WHY NOT- Rhaegar believed his son, Aegon, was “the Prince that was Promised.” Yet, having his second son as a strong warrior would be efficacious.

Jaehaerys

WHY- After Aegon (I and V), Jaehaerys is (one of) the most respected Targaryen kings. Jaehaerys I, called “the Conciliator” ruled for 55 years, brought “the Golden Age” to Westeros, and earned the respect of Dorne. All of this was accomplished with what his predecessor, Maegor I, (and uncle) left behind. Both he and his sister-wife, Good Queen Alysanne ruled together and made some progressive changes within the realm. This includes outlawing “the Right of First Night,” or the rights of a lord to sleep with a common maiden before her new husband, and funding the reconstruction of the Night’s Watch. Naming Jon after a Targaryen who assisted the Night’s Watch, and whose mother is the daughter of the Warden of the North—and a Stark—would be practical.

– Jaehaerys II was Rhaegar’s grandfather who ruled during the War of the Ninepenny Kings, the 5th Blackfyre Rebellion. Even though Jaehaerys II had poor health, he was astute enough to make his mark by reconciling with all of the great houses after the death of his father, King Aegon V—the Unlikely—and, the last Blackfyre War.

WHY NOT- If Rhaegar believed a great war was in the future, then would he choose to name his son after a savant diplomat over a potent warrior?

Jon Snow has many potential names. We can only assume that if Jon decides to his given name, then he will live up to it. At the same time, George R.R. Martin might surprise all of his fans by giving Jon an important, but forgotten Targaryen name like Daeron (who had high ambitions to piece the realm together). Only G.R.R.M. and Bighead and Littlehead know the Targaryen name.