TV Episode Review: “His Dark Materials”: “The Cave”

This episode opens up with Lyra crossing over into another world—our world—to learn more about Dust and about the similarities between her Oxford and Will’s Oxford. Unfortunately, Lyra has to learn how to adapt to this “new” world as she experiences technology—the scene with the car is straight from the books—and people without daemons, poor Pantalaimon.

            Will warns Lyra that people are looking for them and they have to do everything they can to blend in and stay hidden. Alas, Lyra is still young enough to be naïve as she makes her way through Will’s Oxford. She hasn’t figured out that there are a few individuals from her world who’ve made their way into hers a long time ago. 

            Meanwhile, the Magisterium deals with the death of Cardinal Sturrock—due to the witches’ attack and the motivations of both Father MacPhail and Mrs. Coulter—and an election for a new leader must occur before their plans can continue to move forward. At the same time, the witches convene in order to further their plans, before they receive retribution for their actions. The “testimony” provided by Dr. Martin Lanselius delves into the culture of the witches, which reveals why the Magisterium is afraid of them. “Rituals are not secret.” However, does the Magisterium fear the witches, their knowledge, or both? 

            Will’s story continues to develop further in this media adaptation. There are some hints in the books that Will’s father made arrangements for his family just in case something happened to him. Will learns he has living (paternal) grandparents, but soon realizes why his family is estranged from them. Not to mention, they are working with the authorities in the investigation about Will’s father. This scene embellishes Will’s fear of people looking for him. 

            Lyra’s search into what Dust is and her meeting with Dr. Mary Malone is from the books, precisely. Everything from Lyra using the alethiometer to her using Dr. Malone’s equipment, which confirms that both Dust and Dark Matter are the same thing. In my opinion, Dr. Malone’s research about Dust—known as Dark Matter to us—is explained better in the TV series than in the books. This could be because I read the books when I was in high school, and while I’ve heard of Dark Matter, I didn’t know enough about it to grasp the explanation of it in the books. 

            Lyra and Will share a heart-to-heart about their experiences, their situations, and their families. From there, they decide on what they have to do next. At the same time, a new Cardinal has been elected, and someone else has pinned-pointed Lyra’s location. And, the witches’ decision about war is made for them by their adversaries. 

            In all, The Cave was a better and a stronger episode than the previous one. Now, that all of the characters have a better understanding of themselves through their interactions with each other, they know what they have to do and are ready to follow up on those choices. War has been declared, the existence of worlds are starting to become recognized, and actions are about to be taken as the story continues. What will happen in the next episode?  

My Rating: 8.5 out of 10

TV Episode Review: “His Dark Materials”: “The City of Magpies”

Season Two immediately picks up where Season One left off. Lyra Silvertongue has crossed the bridge into a new world. A world that is devoid of people, except for one. Will Parry has found himself in the same world, and Lyra is the first person he’s seen since arriving there. However, both children soon learn that the other isn’t from that world, and they’re not alone. 

            Meanwhile, the witches have joined forces in order to search for Lyra and to protect her as the prophecies continue to play out. They find an ally in Lee Scoresby, who goes in search of another who is said to possess a weapon that offers protection. At the same time, the Magisterium and Mrs. Coulter find themselves preparing for war as they attempt to track down both Lord Asriel and Lyra. 

            The premiere episode of Season Two feels more like a filler than an episode, but it makes sense because there’s supposed to be a “fallout” due to Lord Asriel’s actions. He knew what he was doing and what would happen because of it, but he did it because he believes in his cause. The episode is split between the Magisterium, and Lyra and Will. The Magisterium fears losing power due to the “evidence” that they have no control over their world (and others), and Will and Lyra are searching for a haven. Lyra and Will’s interactions are almost parallel to the events in the beginning of The Subtle Knife—especially the cooking scene. 

            In all, The City of Magpies is a decent premiere of what is to come throughout Season Two. Not all worlds are the same or safe, and tensions continue to build up. Fans will enjoy the new introduction sequence. In addition, there is another cameo appearance by a young actress from another popular media adaptation series which will leave you all even more engaged in the scenes compared to other ones.

My Rating: 8 out of 10

Expectations for Season 2 of “His Dark Materials”

It’s almost time! Season 2 of His Dark Materials will premiere on HBO (in the U.S.) this Monday. This season will be based on the second book in the trilogy, The Subtle Knife, and it will be 8 episodes long, just like Season One. Now, while The Subtle Knife is the shortest book in His Dark Materials trilogy, it doesn’t lack in story, in plot development and in character development.

With the fillers from Season 1, viewers already know who Will Parry is and his “connection” to the Magisterium. In addition, Lyra Silvertongue sees her parents for the type of people they are and decides to leave her world in order to learn more about Dust before confronting her father. Unbeknownst to the two children, everyone is looking for them: the Magisterium, the witches, and their remaining allies. Lord Asriel is building up his army in order to end the reign of the Magisterium and other organizations like it. The numerous witch covens join into a single unit in order to see the prophecy to its end. And, the Magisterium will do all they can in order to gain dominance over all worlds. Yet, how will these adversaries beat the others towards their goal? 

However, searching for “invisible doorways” to other worlds isn’t working for anyone anymore. Now, everyone is searching for a tool that “creates doorways.” Does the tool choose the bearer or does the bearer search for the tool? Is it similar to the alethiometer? Are the two items related? 

The Subtle Knife contains the most action of the trilogy and I expect to see it reflected throughout Season 2 of the TV series. I doubt there will be any fillers, but I’m more curious as to how and when Season 2 will end. Without going into spoilers, I wonder whether or not Season 2 will end in the same manner as The Subtle Knife; or, if some of the opening chapters from The Amber Spyglass—the final book in the trilogy—will seep into Season 2. It was announced fans can expect Season 3—based on The Amber Spyglass—to happen by both the BBC and HBO. The only thing to be concerned with is when to expect the premiere of Season 3—COVID-19 sucks. 

Obviously, I’m very excited for this season of the adaptation of one of my favorite books of all-time. I’ll be reviewing each episode as they air, commenting and making predictions about what will happen next based on the adaptation—as well as the books. Who else is excited about Season 2 of His Dark Materials?

Novella Series Speculative Fiction Readers Need to Read: Part I

Novellas are stories which range from 17,500 to 40,000 words, and they can be read within one sitting. Novellas—along with novelettes and short stories—continue to be written, published and read by all within the publishing industry and the reading community. While novellas are written for all literary genres, in recent years, more of them have been published and read for speculative fiction. That’s NOT to say that they weren’t available, just that there are more available to read now. While Tor.com appears to be dominating the market with novellas—which is NOT a bad thing—there are many novellas from Saga Press, Harper Voyager, DAW Books, and all of the magazines that publish them. There are numerous standalone novellas for speculative fiction fans to read, and there are series—some of which are ongoing—that are worth reading as well. Yes, all of these novellas on this list were released by Tor.com originally, but this is the first list of many that I’m compiling and presenting. It just so happens that one publisher releases more novellas than other ones (for now). 

  • Tensorate by Neon (formerly known as J.Y.) Yang (2017-19)

This series was my introduction into silkpunk. Asian influence aside the story follows the lives of the Royal Family of Protectorate, particularly Protector Sanao—The Empress—and her youngest children—twins, Mokoya and Akeha—as they struggle to maintain control over the Empire as a rebellion grows more ruthless to match the Protector’s cruelty. However, it isn’t just the family saga or the politics that will intrigue readers, but the concept of biological sex and gender fluidity which is a mundane cultural practice in that world. I have read comparisons of this series to The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. LeGuin (I haven’t read it, yet). Regardless, this quartet is worth reading.

The subplot of prophecy versus fate versus free will runs its course throughout the series, too. And yes, all of the books come full circle in the end, which will leave you emitting empathy for all of the protagonists. Not to mention, the last few chapters in the fourth book will stay with you for a long time. 

I love it when authors write stories across genres. After reading Rosewater, The Murders of Molly Southbourne intrigued me with its plot: when a young woman bleeds, clones are created. So, not only does Molly have to prevent herself from bleeding, but also learn how to fight, to kill, and to dispose of these clones. So, how does Molly live her life with this “unusual ‘medical’ condition”? Is there a way to stop it? Is there a cure? Even the second book leaves Molly (and readers) with more questions than answers. Hopefully, the next book will let us know what Molly will do next. 

This is a sci-fi horror/thriller series about the lengths a family will go to in order to protect their secret, and what an individual is willing to do in order to maintain their identity. Even if you’re not into sci-fi or horror or thriller, then you should still read this series because readers receive the point-of-view of the victim who never stood a chance for a “normal” life. 

  • Binti by Nnedi Okorafor (2015-Present)

This Africanfuturistic series will remind readers that with space exploration, xenophobia will continue to be an issue, and only choosing to understand those who are different from themselves will resolve conflict. The series follows Binti as she decides to break one of her culture’s traditions to leave her home to study at the most prestigious universities in the galaxy. However, during the voyage, the ship is attacked by a race of aliens claiming something was stolen from them. When Binti finds herself to be the lone survivor of the attack, she realizes that her skills as a harmonizer will ensure her survival.

The rest of the series deals with both the aftermath and the consequences of Binti’s actions. Readers follow Binti’s first year at the university as she learns to overcome her classes, her PTSD, and her reunion with her family (amongst other things). Binti manages to overcome all of the obstacles she faces while attempting to maintain peace amongst various races and cultures in the galaxy. I’m looking forward to the TV adaptation of this series! 

  • Wayward Children by Seanan McGuire (2016-Present)

This series takes everything you know about portal world fantasy and gives it a dose of reality with multiple worlds existing next to ours. The series centers on a school for children who went “missing” only to return “changed” from their “ordeal.” Their parents believe they are sending their children to a school for therapy; but, the school is a haven for the “visitors” to meet others like themselves who hope to return “home.”

The series alternates between the present and the past allowing readers to learn about the ongoings at the school—and its students—as well as all of the worlds the students reside in, and where they were able to become their true selves. The fact that some of these students might never be able to return “home” adds the reality to the situation that leaves you feeling emotionally twisted as to what our world does to all of us. 

Murderbot is my favorite robot/A.I. of all-time (sorry R2-D2)! I don’t know what else I can say about this snarky and depressed A.I. who performs its tasks so it has more time to watch its favorite TV show?! Murderbot has more empathy for humans than it’s willing to admit, and that’s what makes the series so relatable and engaging. Throughout the first four novellas in this series, Murderbot performs its latest task with a group of scientists, discovers corruption, then decides to travel to various planets to collect evidence of the crime. 

While Network Effect: A Murderbot Novel gave Murderbot the novel length adventure the A.I. deserved (I haven’t read it yet, I’m sorry), Murderbot will return to novellas when the next book in the series, Fugitive Telemetry is released in 2021. I hope the author continues to delight her fans and her readers with this series. And, I want to read an episode of Sanctuary Moon

This is just a starter list of novellas all readers should read. Readers who either want a quick read, or who want to meet their reading goal by the end of the year should check out these books. As for other novella series, I hope to include Impossible Times by Mark Lawrence, Valkyrie Collections by Brian McClellan, Finna by Nino Cipri, others in a future post. As for standalone novellas, I hope to compile a list of them in the near future!

Why You Need to Listen to: “The Original”

The Original

By: Brandon Sanderson & Mary Robinette Kowal                Audiobook: 3 hours 24 minutes

Released: September 14, 2020                                                       Narrated by: Julia Whelan

Genre: Science Fiction/Thriller

            Have you ever listened to any audio story or audio narrative without the text or any visuals to follow along to? I believe the most familiar example of this would be Peter and the Wolf. This Russian “symphonic fairy tale” is presented with specific orchestra ensembles representing each of the characters with a narrator telling the rest of the story. There are audiobooks which are standalones (as in no written edition) and it relies on an excellent narration and an engaging story so that the audience’s attention is maintained from start to finish. The Original by both Brandon Sanderson and Mary Robinette Kowal demonstrates a strong collaboration, but it is the talent of Julia Whelan that gives life to the story through her narration. 

            Holly is the protagonist. She wakes up in a hospital with no memory of how she got there; and, her husband, Jonathan, isn’t with her. She is told by doctors and by Detective Skylar that she is a Clone of the “Original” Holly, and that she was created on the orders of a warrant because Holly murdered her husband. On top of that bit of news, Holly learns she is an “Edited Clone,” which means that changes were made to the body and the DNA that can make a Clone “better” than the “Original.” Finally, Holly is told one more thing: no one can locate the real Holly, and she has to find her and kill her in order to survive. Holly leaves the hospital with her mission to carry out with a set of skills her “Original” doesn’t have and didn’t ask for. The Clone Holly has to shift through shared memories, to survive attacks from people she doesn’t recognize, and to find her Original within 4 days or cease to exist. Does Holly want to live the life of her Original? Can she find her? And, if she does, then will she be able to kill her? 

            The plot is very interesting. A clone awakens, learns the reason for her creation, told her purpose, and is sent to carry it out. Of course, that’s the short version of it. Holly has less than 4 days to find her Original before she ceases to exist because a Clone and its Original cannot exist at the same time. Detective Skylar explains to Holly that after she finds and kills her Original she can live her life for the duration of hers. Meanwhile, Holly is trying to figure out what led her Original to kill Jonathan. She goes through her memories of her relationship and love for Jonathan, his occupation and hers, the last time they were together before the murder, and the murder itself. This leads to Holly having more questions than answers, but she decides that finding her Original and demanding to know why she killed her husband before killing her is how she is going to complete her mission. The subplot is the elements of world-building, many of which includes the idea behind clones and other scientific practices the society performs. In addition to clones, nanotechnology exists so that people can reverse aging and accelerate healing. Yet, Holly discovers that nanotechnology and clones are not wanted by everyone, including Jonathan. So, if Jonathan was against the idea of clones, then why is Holly being promised with a clone of Jonathan after she kills her Original? The subplot develops alongside the plot in which both the society and the conflict are explained further as the story continues. 

            The narrative follows the point-of-view of Clone Holly. This makes for an interesting P.O.V. experience because none of her past experiences are hers, and she cannot remember everything of her past before she was created. This is important to know because this means that when Holly remembers something, it is NOT a flashback! It is NOT amnesia! This is because, one, the memory isn’t hers; and two, Holly can’t remember all of the details surrounding those memories. Holly knows that she was created without all of her memories intentionally. This revelation does make Holly’s stream-of-consciousness very interesting because in between Holly’s confusion and exhaustion, the audience knows how frustrated Holly is throughout everything that is happening to her. This knowledge and the experience Holly goes through makes her a reliable narrator. As a clone, she is dependent on what is being told to her. It is obvious she is being manipulated, but it is not her fault. The audio presentation makes the narration easy to follow. 

            The style both Brandon Sanderson and Mary Robinette Kowal used for The Original delves into two “traditional” conflicts: individual versus society, and science versus nature. Reiterating these conflicts within this story not only demonstrates the reality within the fiction, but also leaves the audience to question their identities as well. The word choice used throughout the narrative was done intentionally by the authors so that the audience can comprehend the story with the scientific terminology, which allows for a thought-provoking story without too much thought. The mood in the story is anxiety. Both the protagonist and the audience are anxious throughout the story as both the truth and the existence is at stake for a clone who isn’t sure whether or not she wants to live. The tone gives the vibe of a cautionary tale. This story serves as a warning against scientific advancements and government control over individuals within a society. 

            This audiobook was narrated by Julia Whelan, and I have to say that I am beyond impressed with how she presented this story. Her voice of the characters are easy to distinguish and her voice for the narrative is enough to keep the audience immersed in the story. If it weren’t for the chapters, then it would have been easy to get lost in the story until the very end. I’m looking forward to hearing her narrate other stories in the future. 

            The appeal for this audiobook have been positive. Many listeners seem to enjoy the story, but have mixed feelings of it being just an audiobook. I know many readers don’t always listen to audiobooks, but what makes The Original standout is that it’s only available as an audiobook. I was able to keep up with the story with the narrator’s pace, but I understand if other listeners did not feel the same way. That being said, both Brandon Sanderson and Mary Robinette Kowal have confirmed during a livestream on YouTube that there is no hurry for a written edition of The Original. If an adaptation were to be done for this audiobook, then I could see it as a graphic novel—both the action sequences and the story’s tone is enough to visualize a graphic novel. Fans of science fiction and readers of novellas will enjoy this audiobook the most. In fact, anyone who is on a long commute and/or are doing household chores should listen to this audiobook. This is because by the time you’re done with the commute or with your chores, you should be done with the story and not have to worry about losing your place within the audiobook. 

            The Original is a brilliant collaboration between two bestselling authors of the speculative fiction genre. Do not be intimidated by the fact that this is an audiobook. If you’ve listened to Broadway musicals on audio, then you can handle a sci-fi thriller novella on audio. At least listen to the story for the second twist in this story! Did you really believe these authors would include only one twist? I’m not going to tell you what it is, so you’re going to have to listen to the story to find out what the other twist is, and it’s not what you think it is!

My Rating: Enjoy It (4 out of 5). 

The Disclosure Behind the 2020 Hugo Awards

A lot can happen in a week. Politics and COVID-19 aside, it seems like “everyone” wants to return to a time when “things were the way they used to be.” Out of all of the prejudices that’s been going around, it seems that ageism continues to be accepted widely due to the notion that “the new will replace the old.” Unfortunately, it seems that “the old” keeps finding ways to hold out for a bit longer, which is equivalent to years. Not only have Americans been forced to admit the issues surrounding race, sex, sexual orientation, religion, ethnicity, sexuality and domestic violence, but also delve into several generational gaps and the beliefs that come from a particular age group. “Trumpeters” aside, it seems that many older White men have nothing better to do than to whine about how modern society is uprooting “the morals and the structure of ‘their youth’.” Yes, because White men have had it so bad, they get to complain about what they no longer have as opposed to other groups of people who are still denied the basic rights and privileges they continue to take for granted. And, it seems that the microcosms are reflecting the macrocosm as certain in-groups continue to find ways to make themselves exclusive as they express their desires to omit other groups of people and to keep them from participating alongside them. In recent years, we all witnessed this happening more and more in Hollywood and film, and in the video game industry. Not to mention, it’s happening within the literary community and the fandom are familiar with the ongoings within speculative fiction.

            One week after Tom Shippey’s comments about fantasy novels in The Wall Street Journal, the 2020 Hugo Awards was livestreamed during Worldcon, which would have been held in New Zealand if it wasn’t for the global pandemic. The good news was, many fans were able to watch the Award Ceremony; the bad news was, those same fans were reminded that those who write speculative fiction are not as open-minded as their stories make them out to be. More people were able to witness the blatant sexism and racism that is whispered about in the publishing industry. Obnoxious doesn’t even begin to describe the behavior of those grown men. 

            First, let me address George R.R. Martin’s mispronunciation of the names of several of the nominees and the presenters. As someone who has worked within education for over a decade, yes there were times when I mispronounced A LOT of names; and, I’m not limiting that list of names to “minority” ones. One, there are some European names a lot of people cannot pronounce. Two, your name maybe unusual and/or hard to say for someone else. Three, names do not always equate to your concept of gender (think of unisex names). So, why were so many people upset with GRRM? It was because many of the nominees saw the name butchering as unprofessional, which it was. Some authors are friends with each other, and they all often attend the same events (I’m assuming here), so it is understandable when after a while the mispronunciation comes off as rude. I understand how those authors felt, and it did ruin the Hugo Award experience for several people, especially the nominees (and the winners). Then again, there are several authors—whose works I’m a fan of—whose names and book titles I cannot pronounce to save my life (audiobooks have been a huge help). I know GRRM issued an apology, but that is neither for myself nor for the fandom to accept because it is for the authors and the creators who were nominated to decide. Whether or not they want to accept it is NOT up to us, it is their choice.

            There was another thing GRRM mentioned that night that has me upset, and it was his statement regarding all of the Finalists for the “Best Novel” category being women. Maybe he was trying to be funny when he said, “maybe we’ll see some men nominated next year,” but the context of that statement—especially after Robert Silverberg’s rant about John W. Campbell’s “legacy”—remains to be open to interpretation. 

            Robert Silverberg is an award-winning author of over 1,000 sci-fi and fantasy stories, some of which won the Hugo, the Nebula, and the Locus Awards. In addition, he was the Toastmaster of several Hugo Award Ceremonies throughout the years. Silverberg’s publishing career started in 1954 and he retired around the early 1990s. As he mentioned in his rant—which was prerecorded—he is a fan (and I want to say a friend) of John W. Campbell’s stories—he is considered to be “the father of modern science fiction”—which he wrote and published during the 1930s, and he talked about the sort of “person” Campbell was when he met up with other authors, including those who were influenced by him. In fact, Silverberg was so defensive of his “idol” that he decided to insult the author who “insulted” Campbell after winning the award that was renamed once it was rediscovered that he was a bigot. Did anyone else notice how many viewers “left” once it became obvious what Silverberg was saying a loud? No one is denying the contribution Campbell made to science fiction, but the truth of the matter remains in tandem with his legacy, which is that Campbell was a racist and a sexist. Like many other (fantasy) readers of my generation, I enjoyed and I’ve been influenced by the Harry Potter series. However, J.K. Rowling has some disturbing views about transgenders (which, she has voiced more than once). Neither the fantasy community nor the fandom—myself included—cannot deny the contribution Harry Potter has had. Yet, while we are able to separate the art from its creator, we must know when to say, “that’s not right.” 

            Let’s face it, everything is changing whether or not we want them to change. I grew up during the 1990s during a time when the Internet was becoming communal tool. Yes, I have my moments of nostalgia, but I don’t wish for things to revert backwards! There are a lot of things that must change and there are some things that we all look forward to happening. Halting progress or returning to the past brings about chaotic results, something we are all witnessing firsthand on a global scale!

            Now, I’m going to sound like the English teacher/instructor I used to be: did you all even bother to read (or, to watch or to play) any of the works that were nominated for the Hugo Awards?! I was under the impression that members of the World Science Fiction Society (WSFS) got to vote for the Hugo Award nominees and winners. Don’t get me wrong, it is NOT easy to attempt to read ALL of the books that get nominated for awards (my Shortlist Award Reading Challenge is a challenge), but to act as though these works aren’t worth reading because it didn’t suit your “preferences” or “expectations” of the genre? Or, were you worried that you wouldn’t be as familiar with the context of works written and created by females, BIPOC/BAME, and/or LGBTQIA+ individuals as you are with those of yourself and your peers?! No one is denying that the authors of the past (and the present) contributed to the genre, but there shouldn’t be a “shared model” for a genre that is dependent on the imaginations and the creativity of each individual. No genre is supposed to remain the same overtime. This is because stagnation kills progress of any kind! If science fiction, fantasy, horror and all the other genres, and the subgenres, within speculative fiction have changed over the course of the last century, then why should it remain constant in order for the genre to befit YOUR preferences? As John Scalzi mentioned on his blog, “’The canon’ didn’t just somehow ‘happen.’ It is a result of choices…” The genre was different before I was born, it has branched out and evolved since my childhood, and it will go beyond our expectations and imaginations with posterity. However, we get to decide on what we read based on what is available, which is A LOT!

            Here is my first of many proposals (hopefully). There are books about the history of fantasy, the encyclopedia of literature, the companion to science fiction, etc. In literature and in poetry, there are “schools” and “literary movements” and “periods” that categorizes the evolution of that “form” of literature based on the era in addition to literary form and genre. We are all familiar with the general history, the definitions, the genres and the subgenres of speculative fiction. However, if the influences and the changes of the genre are going to keep getting mentioned by the “elder” generation, then we should at least consider compiling “schools” and “periods” of the genre so that there is more comprehension than saying, “this author was a contributor of this subgenre due to the works which reflected the genre,” or “this author’s stories cemented this movement within the genre, etc.” For example, one of the most familiar eras of fantasy are “The Inklings.” When that group is mentioned, many know it refers to J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, Charles Williams and other Oxford professors of literature who were also fans of folklore, and wrote stories based on those tales. We need more groups and/or eras like that so that there is recognized clarity within the community. Is this similar to canonization? Yes. However, if time frames and eras are going to keep being brought up, then we can find ways to make it all easy to understand.

            This could be the opportunity the genre needs in order to progress further. I’m not saying that this will resolve any of the issues that have been and continue to be brought up within the speculative fiction community, but it with academic scholars, numerous awards, and an ever-growing fandom, we should consider a plan and/or a project that will involve everyone; especially, if we want the genre to continue to be taken seriously without all of the attention focusing on “elder White heterosexual males” who won’t stop bringing up the past. Think about it because the Hugo Awards are a celebration of the best of the (current) year, and not just the past. All of the groups within this in-group should start working together more in order to include all who participate in the speculative fiction community. For that to happen, we have to acknowledge (and perhaps learn) of all of the eras and the communities within the genre. 

Adult Fantasy: Is There Such a Thing?

Video games, graphic novels and comic books and manga, and fantasy literature continue to share the same criticism from those who are neither fans nor creators: they are for children and/or they have no place in a classroom or in an academic setting. The fact that such notions continue to be made is a disconcerting atrocity; and yet, hip-hop continues to gain recognition and acclaim for its role in the music industry and in the rest of society. Pop culture is what it is, popular culture, but there is a difference between an ephemeral fad and a transcendent impact. All of these genres of various entertainment have succeeded in being true art forms, although there are some who continue to ignore the value of these works and what they mean to the fandom and the creators.  

            In the weekend edition of The Wall Street Journal for July 18-19, 2020, there was a review in the Books section of The Nine Realms tetralogy by Sarah Kozloff. I read and reviewed all of the books in the series—both on my blog and for Fantasy-Faction—and, they are worth reading. However, the author of the review had more things to say other than praise for the book series. 

            During that same weekend, I learned of the review due to all of the retweets about what the author said about the series in relation to his personal feelings about the fantasy genre. I noticed that several authors, bookbloggers, and readers were angry by what was written in the review. Even one of the authors stated they were going to cancel their upcoming interview they had with The Wall Street Journal. Then, I saw who wrote the article. It took some time, but I found myself as annoyed as everyone else eventually. And, I’m still annoyed.

            Tom Shippey, the world-renowned Tolkien scholar, should be ashamed of himself. Writers, creators and fans of fantasy and other genres in speculative fiction have minimal expectations of The Wall Street Journal publishing anything with an open mind else besides economics. Yet, Tom Shippey presented a negative nostalgia of the fantasy genre, also known as stagnation. After everything Shippey has said about Tolkien taking fantasy to new heights—even though that wasn’t Tolkien’s intent—while writing the sort of tales he wanted to read himself, Shippey’s statement about The Nine Realms is an insult to Tolkien’s legacy—including all of the authors that were influenced by Tolkien—but an insult to Sarah Kozloff in which Shippey seemed to use in order to publicize his viewpoints about the genre. As a fan of The Nine Realms, the author deserves more praise than from someone who has been searching for Tolkien. Not only stating that “fantasy has grown up,” but also calling Tor a “sci-fi publisher” tells me that the quest for “adult fantasy” has managed to overlook Robert Jordan, Robin Hobb and Brandon Sanderson amongst numerous other authors as contributors to the genre. 

            The problem with Tom Shippey’s statements regarding fantasy is that after spending years discussing Tolkien, he neglects to recognize all of the fantasy works that came after Tolkien. Not to mention, Shippey made it sound like the genre has not made ANY progress since the publication of The Silmarillion in 1977. His beliefs on the genre demonstrate how other people—those in the out-group—continue to view fantasy as “kid’s stuff,” but to have a Tolkien scholar categorize which fantasy work is “adult fantasy” because that story reflects Tolkien’s “fantasy,” which Shippey spent his entire career hanging on to instead of admitting that the genre has continued to expand, to evolve, and to go beyond everyone else’s expectations. To say that Shippey is “missing out” on what “adult” fantasy has become would be a huge understatement. 

            Although fantasy continues to evolve and to be read by fans ubiquitously, the genre continues to receive harsh criticism, especially when compared to both horror and science fiction. Fantasy has gained more recognition because of the success of movies, television and video games, but to have the genre get identified based on age group adds another layer of prejudice to a genre whose progress remains unrecognized. People are willing to watch it and/or to play it, but reading fantasy remains to be an issue that needs to be addressed constantly. So, this all goes back to literature and answering the age-old question: Who reads this?

            Fantasy, or “myths for adults,” has been around since the beginning of humanity, going back to oral tradition. Even now, myths, legends and other folklore continue to entertain us through all styles and formats. Fairy tales are told and watched, movies allow actors and actresses to become those characters, graphic novels and manga and comics present non-stop illustrations, and video games give players an immersive experience. How is wanting to explore another world different from space travel and/or escaping from a haunted domain? Is it because space travel have become a reality? Is it because we all know what it feels like to experience fear no matter where an individual is? Maybe the issue with fantasy is that it remains open to interpretation. Maybe your personal fantasy world doesn’t match mine. Maybe, you wish to attend Camp Half-Blood over the Convent of Sweet Mercy. Or, you wish to go further and create your own fantasy world and share it with others who share your imagination and curiosity, like Tolkien did then, and what N.K. Jemisin, Neil Gaiman and M.L. Wang continue to do now. 

            As for the concept of “adult,” “children’s,” and “YA” fantasy, we should refer to J.R.R. Tolkien and some of his critical essays. Tolkien was a professor of Anglo-Saxon literature at Oxford University—alongside C.S. Lewis—whose edition of Beowulf and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight are still considered to be some of the “preferred” translations by (some) scholars. Maybe if Shippey recalled Tolkien’s professional works as much as his creative works, then maybe he would have remembered one essay of his in particular. 

            J.R.R. Tolkien wrote On Fairy Stories, and in the essay, he states, “the association of children and fairy-stories is an accident of our domestic history,” and “only some children, and some adults, have any special taste for them…it is a taste, too…one that does not decrease but increases with age, if it is innate.” In other words, if children do not show any interest in fairy tales, then they are not interested in them at all. If an individual is interested in those stories as a child, then do not assume that they will outgrow that interest as an adult. Hence, this is why Doctor Who and James Bond have been around for over 50 years! And before you quote that infamous line from 1 Corinthians 13, remember Tolkien was a devout Catholic who created his own fantasy world and inspired millions! Yet, similar to comics, superheroes, animation and fairy tales, fantasy continues to be criticized as being “too silly for adults” and labelled for children. 

            Yes, Disney altered our perspectives of how fairy tales are told, but the studio continues to water (most of) them down. Only the young readers with enough curiosity and imagination will search for the older (and the more violent and the more tragic) variants collected by the Grimm Brothers, those written by Hans Christian Andersen, and others. Nowadays, those children can read Harry Potter and Alanna of Trebond alongside the books written by Rick Riordan and Holly Black as adolescents. Afterwards, as adults, they can read the stories written by Naomi Novik, Katherine Arden and Neil Gaiman. Then, they can (and will) read all of the “adult fantasy” that is not based on folklore directly. As for the maturity content found within (most) adult fantasy, let me put it this way: Shakespeare is required reading in many secondary schools, and many of the plays that are read and/or performed tend to be from the “tragedies” catalog, not the “histories” or the “comedies.” And yes, I just brought up Shakespeare in an essay about Tolkien! Deal with it!

            Tom Shippey is one of the most informed Tolkien scholars, but his knowledge and his interests are limited to Tolkien. The Wall Street Journal tries and fails, constantly, to present insight into other topics besides economics. The newspaper has more than enough resources to gather authors and scholars of the fantasy genre, but wish to limit themselves by delivering something that reflects American society from the 1960s. Jack Zipes and Elizabeth Tucker are prime examples of scholars of folklore and children’s stories. If you want to discuss how much video games have evolved, then read what Frans Mäyrä, Nick Yee, Mia Consalvo, and other game studies scholars have to say and what they have researched. As for scholars of fantasy literature, you can start with Edward James, Farah Mendlesohn and Nnedi Okorafor.

            Ironically, this essay was written and posted during Worldcon 2020, which presents the Hugo Awards to authors in recognition of their achievements in science fiction or fantasy works for (mostly) adult readers and are chosen by its (adult) members. As I await the announcement of the winners, I’ll be reading N.K. Jemisin, Seanan McGuire, S.A. Chakraborty, John Gwynne and other authors of “adult fantasy.” If either Tom Shippey or The Wall Street Journal are interested, then I can offer a galaxy of books for you to choose from; and, you will find them all to be magical and extraordinary. 

            The peculiar quality of the “joy” in successful Fantasy can thus be explained as a sudden glimpse of the underlying reality or truth. It is not only a “consolation” for the sorrow of this world, but a satisfaction, and an answer to that question, “Is it true?” The answer to this question that I gave at first was (quite rightly), “If you have built your little world well, yes: it is true in that world.”

—J.R.R. Tolkien, On Fairy Stories, Epilogue

My Shortlist Award Reading Challenge 2020

Yes, I am late with this post, but that doesn’t mean I haven’t been keeping up with the news surrounding the nominees for this year’s speculative fiction awards. The good news is that thanks to all of my reading throughout the previous year, I’ve read a lot of the books that have been nominated for these awards. The bad news is that all of the conventions have been cancelled due to the COVID-19 Pandemic. The silver lining is that many of these Cons and awards will be presented through livestream events. Yet, I feel sad for many of the nominees, especially the debut authors, because they will not be able to accept the award and give their acceptance speech in person. At the same time, I know some of these Cons are open to fans, and a lot of them had to cancel their plans as well. It does make the livestreams good enough substitutes and next year’s Cons will make up for it all, but it’s still a bummer. 

            Like I said, I read a lot of the nominees for almost all of this year’s speculative fiction awards. If you click on this Google Document that I’ve shared (https://docs.google.com/document/d/1G2uYVlAPclCA83KYOb3n5G-xLfW5xza5HT50dz5uX4Y/edit?usp=sharing), then you’ll find which books I’ve been able to review so far. However, I’ve read enough of the nominees—mostly novels and novellas—to know that it’ll be another close year in terms of the winner. I have my picks of who is going to win, but in most cases, I can’t determine who the winner(s) will be. Nevertheless, I’m excited for all of these speculative fiction awards. Fans and readers should not only pay attention to the Nebulas and the Hugos, but also to the British Science Fiction Association, or BSFA, the Aurealis Awards, and the Nommo Awards (to start). On a serious note, there’s a lot more going on in Australia, in Africa, and within their writing communities than those of us residing in the rest of the continents can comprehend. 

            As for the awards themselves (some of them), both the nominations and the dates of them have been delayed. For example, the BSFA Awards were supposed to be in April during Eastercon, but the event was postponed until May. Those awards will be livestreamed this weekend (check their website for the link). It seems that most of these awards will be streamed, but we’ll have to consult the Awards’ websites and social media pages for information and dates. This experience will be memorable, and we won’t miss them. 

            Just like last year, I’ll update my Google Doc as both the nominations and the winners are announced. I’ll share any information on whether or not the awards will be streamed and when they’ll occur on social media. I suggest you follow any information provided by the award organizations themselves on their websites, which are listed below. Read or watch the nominated works as well. And, look out for my post on the wrap up of my Reading Challenge, which will be posted towards the end of the award season (whenever that is). Please note: the S.P.F.B.O. 6 will be mentioned in separate posts! Let me know which of the nominees you’ve read! Enjoy this year’s awards and nominations! 

            If any of the information listed below is incorrect, then please let me know.

Philip K. Dick: https://www.philipkdickaward.org

BSFA: https://bsfa.co.uk 

Nebula: https://nebulas.sfwa.org

Aurealis: https://aurealisawards.org

Brave New Words: https://www.starburstmagazine.com

Hugos: http://www.thehugoawards.org

Lambda Literary: https://www.lambdaliterary.org

Compton Crook: http://www.bsfs.org 

Otherwise (formerly the Tiptree Award): https://otherwiseaward.org 

The Kitschies: http://www.thekitschies.com

BFA: http://www.britishfantasysociety.org

Locus Awards: https://locusmag.com

Arthur C. Clarke Award: https://clarkeaward.com

Nommo Award: http://www.africansfs.com/home

Bram Stoker Awards: http://www.thebramstokerawards.com

World Fantasy Award: http://www.worldfantasy.org/

Review of Season One of “His Dark Materials”

Season one of His Dark Materials, based on The Northern Lights/The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman has completed its run on the BBC and on HBO, and they didn’t alter the ending! Overall, season one was a great adaptation to the books and some of the “fillers” worked well for the narrative that was presented to the audience. Readers got to enjoy scenes that were denied to them from the 2007 movie and viewers were able to grasp the demeanor of all of the characters thanks to both the actors’ portrayals of the characters and the “fillers” which were added for additional context. 

            It should be mentioned that the TV mini-series was a better adaptation than the movie, but this is due to the fact that neither the studios, nor the test audience (these are based on rumors, which have circulated over and over again) interfered with the editing of the series. The order of the events presented matched the way they occurred in the books, the “true” ending of season one ended the way it does in the books, and the revelations of what was happening to the missing children weren’t glossed over. Yes, the movie did get a lot of things right, and those were repeated in the series, but the TV series is more in tandem with the books.

            The issues I have with the series so far should be mentioned as well. First, is the aging up of some of the younger characters. Lyra, Roger, and Billy were all close to the age of the characters they portrayed (between 10 and 12 years-old), but Will Parry was aged up to 15 years-old (he’s around 12-13 years-old when readers first meet him). I want to say this was because of the age of the actor who is portraying Will, but it’s difficult to determine whether or not this is the case. Yes, there have been some cases in which the age of the character(s) have been altered due to the actors that play them, but there have been even more examples of when it’s happened because the studio(s) believe it’ll make the narrative “more believable.” If it’s the former, then I have no complaint; but if it’s the latter, then they should stop making it so obvious. 

            Next, were the ways the proximity of daemons were presented to the viewers. While in the books, it is unclear what the actual distance a human can be “away” from their daemon, it is clear that the proximity has to be very close in order for human and daemon to maintain their bond and their lives. However, there are moments when the proximity is unclear and that is due to the way some of daemons are presented. Sometimes they are far enough for the individual not to experience pain, and then they are so far away that you wonder whether or not they could be similar to a witch’s daemon. I hope the network and the studio corrects this misconception for season two because it became very confusing between each episode. 

            Last, was the way Dust is presented throughout the season. The mystery of Dust was portrayed better than the knowledge of it. The explanation provided in the season finale is straight from the books, but the “danger” of someone outside of Jordan College and the Magisterium having knowledge of what Dust is—which, was presented better in the movie—wasn’t demonstrated in the series the way it should have been, in my opinion. Then again, Dust is supposed to be remain a mystery throughout the series until the end. 

            Besides the casting and the special effects, there were several things that I enjoyed about season one from the titles of the episodes—based on chapters in the books—to the way the parental figures were portrayed in the series. Presenting both Mrs. Coulter and Mrs. Parry as “damaged” individuals who try to balance their demeanor with their desire to be mothers to their children was presented extremely well. The issue of succession and power amongst the panserbjørne and the Magisterium—which, are both essential to the plot of the story—were presented (with the details given throughout the books) with the hypocrisy immensely. And, the motives of Lord Asriel and his reasons for doing everything he does comes back full circle. Lord Asriel is what keeps the narrative moving along and the series makes sure that the viewers do not forget it. Yet, it was Ruth Wilson’s portrayal of Mrs. Coulter that grasped the viewers’ attention the most. 

            Overall, season one of His Dark Materials was the adaptation fans of the books waited for patiently, and the wait was worth it. All of the details that were omitted from the 2007 movie were included, the pacing matched the books and were appropriate for a TV mini-series, and the inclusion of source material from other books in the Philip Pullman’s universe—both The Book of Dust and The Subtle Knife—enriched the narrative more than expected and it worked well for the audience, both readers and viewers. Season two was announced by the BBC (with HBO promising to continue showing the series in the U.S.), which is great because this news is what book fans have been waiting for the most! The adaptation of The Subtle Knife will not only continue Lyra’s story, but also continue the narrative from the multiple cliffhangers this time around. Yes, the books should be read, but knowing that the mini-series will continue makes book fans as excited as the viewers more than anyone else can imagine! 

If you want the reviews of each episode, then you can click on each of the episode titles below:

S1, Ep.1: Lyra’s Jordan

S1, Ep. 2: The Idea of North

S1, Ep. 3: The Spies

S1, Ep. 4: Armour

S1, Ep. 5: The Lost Boy

S1, Ep. 6: The Daemon-Cages

S1, Ep. 7: The Fight to the Death

S1, Ep. 8: Betrayal

My Rating: 8.5 out of 10! 

TV Episode Review: “His Dark Materials: Betrayal”

The season finale of Season One begins with both Mrs. Coulter and Lord Asriel—Lyra’s parents—preparing for what they’ve been planning for since the first episode. The former is planning to kill Lord Asriel under the orders of the Magisterium, and the latter is planning something that involves the aurora—a.k.a. the northern lights—and this involves his strange interest in Roger. 

            Lyra’s reunion and confrontation with her father does not go the way she wants it to go. Lord Asriel admits that he is Lyra’s father, but he’s not going to be the sort of father she wants him to be. Meanwhile, Mrs. Coulter admits that her abandoning Lyra was a mistake and she’s been trying to rectify it. Lyra goes from being an orphan to knowing she’s an abandoned child, and she doesn’t know how to deal with either the knowledge or the rejection of it. It is Roger who comforts her when she doesn’t know how to deal with her feelings. Roger tells Lyra that they can “pretend to be orphans” again, knowing life for them has changed and things won’t ever be the same. 

            Lord Asriel makes the decision to explain to Lyra the purpose of his research and his reason for him being absent. The discussion of Dust and its origins comes from the novel. The Magisterium believes that Dust is Original Sin and that it begins to affect humans once they start puberty. Lyra begins to understand why the Magisterium conducted the experiments on the missing children, and Lord Asriel explains his beliefs on Dust and his discovery about the aurora and Dust—it can build a bridge between worlds. He asks Lyra if she wants to go with him, but Lyra has already decided to return to Jordan College with Roger. 

            Meanwhile, Lord Carlo Boreal continues his search for the Parrys and the letters. Will is hiding in town knowing that the police are looking for him because of the man he killed. What Will doesn’t know is that the reason he’s being tracked is because Lord Carlo Boreal is using the police to find him. It’s interesting how far the power of the Magisterium stretches across the worlds. Will manages to stay hidden, but he knows that it’s only a matter of time before he’s found, and he needs to hide somewhere where no one can find him. 

            Lyra wakes up when the Magisterium has arrived to arrest her father, but her father has already left taking Roger with him to the peak of the mountain. Lyra realizes that her father didn’t need the alethiometer, but Roger. Lord Asriel needed a child whose daemon hasn’t settled yet in order to use the energy from the bond to create a bridge. Similar to how Mrs. Coulter wouldn’t sacrifice Lyra to the intercision, Lord Asriel refused to sacrifice Lyra. This could be viewed as a twisted type of love parents have for their child.  

            Lyra rushes to save Roger. She dodges the Magisterium’s attacks thanks to Iorek Byrinison and the other panserbjørnes; however, not even Iorek can travel across the thin bands of ice. Lyra Silvertongue says goodbye to Iorek not knowing what will happen once she reaches the top. Pantalaimon tells Lyra that Roger is in a cage similar to the one at The Station and Lyra knows what her father plans to do. Unfortunately, she’s too late. Lord Asriel creates the bridge at the cost of the life of his daughter’s best friend. 

            Mrs. Coulter arrives too late as well, but she resists her orders to kill her former lover. Lord Asriel tells her of his plans to end the Magisterium and asks her to join him. It’s a brief, yet strange, reconciliation between Lyra’s parents (in which, Lyra witnesses firsthand in the book). However, Mrs. Coulter rejects Lord Asriel in order to stay with Lyra. Lyra regains consciousness in time to avoid her mother and she goes to say goodbye to Roger. Lyra decides that she needs to find Dust before her father and the Magisterium. At the same time, Will goes to the park, the same one where Lord Carlo Boreal travels from, where he finds a cat that disappears into thin air. Lyra and Will go through the bridges at the same time not knowing where they’ll end up. 

            Betrayal is an appropriate season finale because it wraps up all of the plots throughout the season going back to the events of the first episode. All of the questions asked from that first episode are answered. The deviation from the books works for this episode as well because it fits with the adaptation presented to us by the BBC and HBO. The only question left is “what happens next?” There will be a season two, which will be based on The Subtle Knife. Hopefully, the next season will continue to follow the darker tones left by season one.

My Rating: 9.0 out of 10.