My Favorite Speculative Fiction Narratives

***My 200th Blog Post!!!***

For this post, which marks a new milestone for me, I decided to discuss one of the most enjoyable—and the most dreadful—topics: favorites. We all know why favorites is a fun topic, but it can be daunting for opposing reasons: others have them as their favorites, they are ubiquitous, they are different from yours, etc. 

            Why am I using the term “narrative” instead of story? What is a narrative? MasterClass has a great definition of the word (no, I am NOT a member). “A narrative is a way of presenting connected events in order to tell a ‘good’ story. A narrative unites distinct events by concept, idea, or plot.” Narratives have existed since the start of humanity, and they range from folktales to poetry to visual media, etc.

            So, why am I using narrative for this post? It is because it is tied to the topic of my 100th post. In that post, I mentioned how speculative fiction genres and subgenres can be used for films and video games. Personally, I believe speculative fiction should include both visual art mediums more often because many films and video games are presenting narratives. Yes, many films (and TV shows) are based on text narratives (a.k.a. books)—and, some video games are based on books and films; yet, there are many films and video games that standout because they are excellent narratives that are NOT based on books.

            Think about it, which films and video games are considered to be the best based on their narratives? And yes, not everyone has seen the same films, and not everyone plays the same video games, but you’ve heard of the “popular” ones and the “excellent” ones. Most of the these are critically acclaimed within their own academy, but their narratives are what capture our attention the most as we progress through them. These narratives are so captivating, we appreciate them regardless of the medium they are being presented to the audience. 

            So, for this post, I will be discussing my favorite speculative fiction narratives. My (current) favorites span across speculative fiction genres and narratives formats. Expect not only books, but also films and video games as well. Many of my favorites shouldn’t surprise you, but I hope you understand why I continue to gush over these narratives. This is a Top 10 List, but the order is based on when I experienced each one.

  • His Dark Materials Trilogy (1995-2000) by Philip Pullman

Known as both “the most dangerous man in the U.K.” and “J.K. Rowling’s contemporary” this (now retired) Oxford professor has been enjoying the latest adaptation of this dark fantasy—with blended elements of science fiction and religion—trilogy which have been more faithful to the books. This trilogy was published right before the Harry Potter Phenomenon, which were released in tandem (to the first half of the Harry Potter series). And, while this series might not have the same amount of fans as Hogwarts, readers of this series became devoted fans who waited years for the same level of media adaptation as its counterpart. 

I’ll say it right now, this is my favorite book series from my childhood. That’s over Harry Potter, Animorphs, and other series (from the same decade). Why? Because this series had a narrative that presented various conflicts within a coming-of-age story with realistic elements—which we take for granted—told through a lens that is speculative fiction. In addition to the protagonist being a less than ideal heroine (she has flaws), she takes matters into her own hands in order to do what she believes is the right thing to do, regardless of what the authority figures tell her to do.

Not only was this series my introduction to portal fantasy—I read C.S. Lewis’ and L. Frank Baum’s series in college and in grad school respectively—and genre blending. This trilogy is fantasy that contains several elements of science, religion and folklore—dæmons are a belief from Ancient Greece and the shamanism dates back to the Pre-Socratic Era—which tie into the plot, the character development, and the world-building. You can recognize the series based on keywords mentioned from the beginning to the ending. 

This narrative is one of my favorites because it takes the familiar tropes of a fantasy story (i.e. family) with real life elements (i.e. science) and scenarios (i.e. identity) and allows it to be presented between science fantasy and reality. And, the idea that a single action can lead to the same ramifications in all worlds is extremely thought provoking as well. The series’ ending—given the circumstances—is satisfying. This narrative has you saying, “what is” instead of “what if.”

  • Spirited Away, Sen to Chihiro no kamikakushi (2001)

I remember when this movie was released in the U.S., but I didn’t get to see it in theaters. When I did sit down to watch this movie, I was mesmerized by both the animation and the narrative. And, while I understand the comparisons between this narrative and Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland—and even The Wonderful Wizard of Oz—this story, fused with Japanese folklore, stands out on its own.

Chihiro isn’t a curious young girl who wanders into a magical world. She is a whiny child who is saddened with moving to a new home with her parents who are more optimistic about the move than her. When they get lost, it is her parents whose curiosity leads them all into the spirit world, where they are trapped inside. Chihiro is forced to complete the “Hero’s Quest” by completing 3 tasks. However, Chihiro is a 10-year-old girl, and she behaves like one throughout the narrative. It won’t be easy.

I love the narrative within this movie because it explores the balance between fantasy and folklore. Some tales from a region’s religion, culture and/or superstitions are often dismissed as being “false” or “fantasy.” However, the fantastic often presents what is real in its own way; and, this movie presents a spirit world with more than one location within it, which demonstrates that world is as vast as ours. There is one unanswered question: how long were Chihiro and her parents in the spirit world for? 

  • Final Fantasy X (2001)

I’ve discussed my love for video games before, but I haven’t talked about them as much as I wanted to beforehand. Some readers of speculative fiction do enjoy video games of the same genres, but role-playing games—a.k.a. R.P.G.s and Japanese R.P.G.s—are visual narratives in which you play your way through the story until you reach its end. And, some of the games in this genre are both popular and laudable enough for all gamers to play at least once.

Everyone has their favorite Final Fantasy game; and, each game in the main series has its own superlative. For example, in my opinion, Final Fantasy VII is the “Most Popular” game in the series. Final Fantasy X has my favorite narratives in this series. In addition to this game having an excellent story—which the other games in the (main) series all have in common—this game presents a narrative in which all of the main characters develop and grow over the course of the game.

            You play as Tidus, a famous athlete who takes after his father (who he hates and has been missing for 10 years). During a game, the city is attacked by an entity, and Tidus is transported 1,000 years into the future. From this point in the game, Tidus (and the player) learn about the world they find themselves in, what happened to their world since the initial attack there, and how the two are tied together. Conflicts and themes surrounding power, identity, religion, beliefs, love and choice are presented in each of the main characters throughout the gameplay. Each conflict and its relation to each character is presented early within the narrative. However, as each “truth” is revealed to the party, they must decide on how they want to carry on knowing the consequences of their actions. While the ending is bittersweet, you finish the game’s narrative aware that the world will be able to start anew; which is something we can all learn from this game.

            Final Fantasy X is one of the games in this main series with a direct sequel. Final Fantasy X-2 (2003) takes place a few years after the events of its predecessor. This presents a unique, yet believable, look into how the world has changed, and how the main characters have changed with it.             

  • The Twelve Kingdoms (1992-Present, Japan; 2007-10, U.S.A.) by Fuyumi Ono

Personally, I believe we take narratives for granted. Yes, we learn how stories were told orally and passed down from generation through posterity, then collected and written down, and then translated into other languages so more can enjoy them. The 1990s saw the demand for Asian content to be presented to a Western audience, and not just action movies. TV shows, anime, manga, etc., were in high demand; some works of literature were translated as well. Battle Royale: The Novel and the movie have a strong cult following, but some light novels (Japanese YA novels) were being translated as well.

Sea of Shadow is the first book in The Twelve Kingdoms, and the narrative focuses on the trope of the outcast and presents it in a way that is both heartbreaking and inspiring. Yoko Nakajima has lived her entire life as an outcast. She is a high-schooler with red hair living in Japan with her traditional parents. Although she is an only child, she receives little love from her parents; she gets good grades in school, but she is ostracized due to her hair color. All Yoko knows is how to get through life by trying to please everyone around her. One day, a man with golden hair appears at her school—which is an all-girls school—abducts her from her classroom, and spirits her away to a world where Asian folklore and fantasy are authentic. After arriving, Yoko is separated from the man and now must survive in a world where she is even more of an outcast than in our world. 

This narrative is part coming-of-age and part survival story. Yoko is in a place where she is considered to be a criminal because she is an immigrant. After a few close calls, she is left on her own to survive in the wilderness. From there, Yoko grows into the individual she was forced to suppress due to her familial and societal notions. After accepting that there is nothing left for her in our world (she can never go home anyway), Yoko mush find a reason to keep living throughout all of the adversities she faces. Her goal matches a shocking revelation about herself.

The rest of the series introduce new characters and reintroduces fan favorites as the timeline of the 12 Kingdoms’ history is covered throughout each book. The same issues of immigration, regional biases and political conspiracies are covered in the narratives of each book. In addition, without too many spoilers, each of the protagonists in each book represent one of 3 types of societal outcasts within that world. 

Print copies of this series is limited; not to mention just 4 books in the series were translated to English. There is an anime series based on the first 4 books which you can stream online. Hopefully, one day we’ll get the rest of the series translated and released.

  • Pan’s Labyrinth, El labriento del fauno (2006)

I’ve discussed fairy tale retellings and fractured fairy tales, but I haven’t mentioned fairy tales and folktales as often as I should in my posts. In short, fairy tales are a genre of folktales in which there is a strong storyline and plot, emphasis upon magic and fantasy, repeated motifs and tropes, with a “happy ending.” Characters are represented as good or evil, and there are beings with magical powers or objects which serve a purpose for the characters. Director Guillermo del Toro wrote and directed his own fairy tale, Pan’s Labyrinth, in which he blends fantasy, magic realism and folklore into this poignant, yet dark film. 

The setting of the narrative grabs your attention immediately. It is the end of the Spanish Civil War (1936-9)—which occurred in tandem with the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937-45) and World War II (1939-45)—and a young girl, Ofelia, and her pregnant mother are traveling to her (new) stepfather’s residence. The protagonist’s stepfather is a captain in Franco’s army, which holds dominance over Spain. Ofelia does her best to cope with the changes by retreating into fairy tales, her favorite literary genre, which the adults all comment that “she is too old for them.” Amidst the violence that happens outside of the home, Ofelia comes across a magical faun who tells her her true identity and the 3 tasks she must complete in order to prove that she is “the lost princess.” 

The narrative is haunting and beautiful as it explores the reasons why anyone would read fantasy and fairy tales; besides escapism, they offer a semblance of hope during difficult times. Not to mention, this is one of the few “fairy tales” where there is a villainous step-father instead of a step-mother (and he’s not a child molester). Each of the 3 tasks correlate to the themes of war and violence—not to mention one of the scariest evil creatures in recent narratives to date—and whether or not magic does exist.

This new fairy tale resembles the older variants which were collected by the Grimm Brothers, and written by Perrault, Andersen, and Baum. In other words, it is for adults not children; that being said, anyone who is a fan of fairy tales will appreciate how new tales can emerge through the appreciation of previous ones. And yes, you can read the literary variant of this narrative—released in 2019—but the film presents how the audience, and the general public, continue to take these narratives for granted instead of seeing them for what they are: a much needed and a wonderful fairy tale. 

  • Shin Megami Tensei: Persona 5 (2016)

I’ve played both Persona 3 and Persona 4—which you should as well—and, while those entries in the series have great narratives, characters and gameplay, it does not have the same down-to-Earth element Persona 5 maintains throughout the entire game. The series is an urban fantasy JRPG with elements of folklore, science, horror and paranormal in it. Persona 3 delves into themes of depression. Persona 4 is a murder mystery which focuses on the effects of media coverage and urban legends. Persona 5 investigates how societal norms and conformity has a negative effect on individuals. 

The narrative focuses on a group of misfit students who are victims of misconceptions placed upon them by the adults in their lives and the rest of society. Anyone who remembers feeling like an outcast—even in adulthood—can relate to these emotions. And yet, the game explores how it is not only adults and power figures who mistreat other individuals, but also other children and adolescents. In addition, players realize how each of the antagonists ended up as they are because of societal expectations. Are the Phantom Thieves heroes, or “a group of meddling kids”?

The narrative within this game is the reality within the fiction. The unfortunate truth is that we all know more than 1 person in our life and “social circle” who is similar to the characters in the game. Another factor to consider is that the narrative forces us to look at ourselves and to determine whether or not we are mistreating anyone for our own gain. The game’s narrative serves as one part fable and one part entertainment.

I’ll mention the narrative within Royal as well. Without getting into too many spoilers, the narrative in this part of the narrative focuses on how manifested desires allows us to achieve a life that is too good to be true, and the causes and the consequences of living such a life. Living this life can lead us to being “out of touch” from reality, especially to those who might be suffering because life isn’t as good for them. Persona 5 (Royal) examines the lives we choose to live while fighting beings from folklore around the world. 

From the first page to the final sentence of this trilogy you are transported to a world where science, fantasy, history, magic and reality enmesh into one of the most engrossing narratives of all time. What if the seasons lasted for several centuries? What if Earth was unstable due to tectonic activity? What if there were individuals who could control seismic activity? What if life on Earth was dead for centuries? Would you be able to survive?

In the far future, Earth has become an unstable planet where earthquakes kill life for centuries at a time. In a twist of fate, some humans gained abilities to sense and to control the Earth’s tectonic activity; so what does the majority of humanity do? Resort to the old methods of societal oppression by practicing fear, control and slavery of these individuals for millennia, which leads to the beginning of the series where a woman arrives at her home to find her toddler son has been murdered, her daughter abducted by her father, and her secret exposed to her community. On top of that, the “fifth season” has begun, so she must hurry and find her daughter (and kill her now ex-husband) before the surface becomes too uninhabitable to survive. 

This series not only takes genre blending to a new level, but also reminds the readers of the dangers of repeating negative social norms instead of solving the bigger problem. Not to mention how such negative treatment and hostility affects posterity for the worse; and, how far will any mother go to protect her child(ren)? And, what will a child do to ensure their own survival? The world-building explains the current predicament the characters find themselves in and how the planet ended up the way it did. In addition, this is one of the few series in which the beginning chapters play a huge role in the narrative. Even the 2nd person P.O.V. chapters are well-written. You finish reading this series knowing it was an amazing narrative. There is a reason why every book in this trilogy won the Hugo Award for Best Novel, and in consecutive years. 

How do I describe Murderbot to someone who hasn’t read this series? Murderbot is a brilliant A.I. who is smart enough to gain control over itself, hates stupidity, has a bleak outlook on life to the point where it borders on nihilism, watches soap operas so that it can understand humans better, and is very good at its job at providing security and killing threats to those under its protection. On a serious note, I haven’t laughed so much regarding robots since watching the Star Wars movies.

The series follows Murderbot—which is what it calls itself—on its latest assignment, protecting a group of scientists as they explore a planet. After a close call, it wonders if something else was happening on that planet, not that it cares what happens to the humans. Basing its knowledge about humans on the T.V. show it watches (i.e. Sanctuary Moon), Murderbot concludes that some of the other humans are up to no good. So, it abandons its post to go on a mission to determine whether or not Murderbot is right; but, not because it cares about the humans who were nice to it. And, from there the narrative takes off. 

With 5 novellas and 1 novel (with more books expected in the future) readers get to look into how the future could look—and without any intergalactic wars, just corporate greed. Through Murderbot’s P.O.V., readers learn how various types of robots are created and are treated throughout the galaxy, and how they interact with each other when they have the opportunity to do so. Murderbot is a “Security Unit, or Sec Unit,” whose purpose is to follow orders and to protect those within its “contract.” But, Murderbot is smart enough to play dumb when it has to survive and to remain incognito from other bots, A.I.s, and humans. 

Each narrative is a “report” of events Murderbot has to submit. And, given its personality, expect a lot of laughs because you will get its inner thoughts as well; and they are on point! Anyone who wants to read a sci-fi action-adventure series with a funny and a unique narrative will enjoy this one as much as I do. 

After reading so many fantasy stories (and playing them), you ask yourself 2 questions. One, if I ended up in a fantasy world, then what would it be like? Two, if I found myself in another world I started to call, “Home,” then why would I consider returning to the world I came from? Seanan McGuire isn’t the first author to think about these things (read the Oz books by L. Frank Baum), but she is one of many to consider such worlds existing parallel to ours. 

Wayward Children takes the trope of “lost/wandering” children—they ended up in a different world with a different set of rules and time span—and transforms it into a new narrative with a twist. The ones who “return” are “changed” by their time in the other world, which they called Home. Their families don’t know what to do with them, so they send them to “Eleanor West’s Home for Wayward Children” (or, its sister school in Maine) so they can become “reacclimated” into society again. In truth, these students are searching for ways to return Home by looking for their Doors.

The series is divided into 2 narrative sequences. The first one follows the ongoings at the school, which is more like a school than the characters want to admit. There are disagreements about clothes, cliques are formed based on the sort of worlds they traveled to, and what their plans are for the future—in our world or in their Homes. Not to mention, when they do go on quests, they have to be quick about it, so Miss West doesn’t tell their parents. The second one focuses on each adventure each character, or characters, has in the world they traveled to, from how they found themselves there to the reason(s) why they had to leave it. The one thing these characters all have in common is that they’ll do anything to return Home. 

Worlds such as Fairyland, the Moors, the Goblin Market, Hooflands, and several more where beings such as mermaids, talking skeletons, resurrected individuals, centaurs, etc., exist in worlds next to ours. In fact, some of those worlds are connected to each other as well. How many other worlds exist? Which one would you find yourself in and why? Would you want to stay there or return to our world? 

The narrative of this novel begins with a familiar trope before twisting into something else. The protagonist, Sasha, is on vacation with her mother when she notices a strange man watching and following her. When she confronts him, he gives her strange tasks to complete. The catch is if she doesn’t complete them, then a loved one will suffer the consequences. After the first failure, she accomplishes all of the tasks given to her (which causes her to vomit gold coins). Afterward, Sasha is coerced into attending a university in order to “enhance” her knowledge.

Before you start comparing this book to Harry Potter, Percy Jackson, etc., remember, Sasha was coerced into attending this university (which is in the isolated and rural parts of Russia). In fact, all of the students are in the same situation as Sasha, but why are they there? What makes them different from their former high school classmates? What are they supposed to be learning? 

This narrative blends the college experience within a speculative fiction setting. Sasha and her college peers have to deal with roommates, classes, changing family relationships, and the changes that go with being away from home; but, they don’t have the option to flunk out of the university. If a student fails their classes or reveals the ongoings at the university, then their families will pay the price. This is done to ensure the secrecy of the university and the success of their students. As for what they are studying, well none of the students know until halfway through their second year. And then, they have to study for a test so that they can “attend” the graduate program.

Without giving away anything else, the narrative does an amazing job balancing college life with the unexpected. And, similar to the narrative, the college experience becomes an addiction you don’t want to give up. In fact, some of the students decide to stay at the university during the holidays, instead of returning home. No one is forcing them to stay there during that time, so why won’t they leave? And, what happens to the students—including Sasha—when they begin to comprehend their “schoolwork”?

            Those are my (current) favorite speculative fiction narratives. Yes, they are on my lists of favorites by medium as well, but I won’t be mentioning that topic anytime soon. I hope you all consider reading, watching and/or playing what I listed here. If anything, then I hope you enjoy the stories being told as much as I did, and still do.

            Coincidentally, I started my blog site 9 years ago, and it started as a simple hobby. It’s amazing what any individual can achieve when given the opportunity to do so. Thank you to everyone who encouraged me to keep my blog going from when I was just posting theories about A Song of Ice and Fire and pop culture essays. I wasn’t sure whether or not anyone would read the posts on this blog; then again, I didn’t believe I had so much to say about literature, social issues, pop culture, etc. I’ve been able to branch out and work on projects for other websites (i.e. Fantasy-Faction, SWFA). So, thank you for reading, liking, commenting, and sharing my work; especially when I was attending grad school and I had to limit the content in my posts. And, a huge thank you to the publishers, the authors (and their literary agents), and other bookbloggers for sending me ARCs and galleys of so many books so I am able to keep up with the industry; and, as I make my way through my never-ending TBR pile.           

            Obviously, I’ll still be posting on my blog while working on all of my many projects and any new ones that come my way. A few of you have asked me about one potential project (more like a revival). My answer: I’ll decide after the New Year because there are other things that require my immediate attention. So you’ll have to wait and see. 

            Here’s to 9 years and to 200 blog posts with hopes that I make it to the next milestone. 

Why You Need to Read: “The Burning God”

The Poppy War Trilogy, #3: The Burning God

By: R.F. Kuang                                                                       Audiobook: 23 hours 47 minutes

Published: November 17, 2020                                              Narrated by: Emily Woo Zeller

Genre: Historical Fantasy, Grimdark, Military Fantasy, Folklore

            What was wrong with her? She’d started and ended wars. She’d buried a god. She’d incinerated a country. There wasn’t an entity on the planet that could face her in a fair fight and win. She was certain of her own strength; she’d sacrificed everything to make sure she never felt powerless again. 

            So why was she so afraid? (Chapter Eight). 

            History presents war with selections to choose from; some wars are revolutions, some wars are civil, some wars are invasions, and so on and so forth. The surface of war may be simple, but the layers run so deep it’s difficult to determine the alliances and the motivations for it. Not to mention, war affects EVERYONE and EVERYTHING. The Burning God—the third and final book in The Poppy War Trilogy—by R.F. Kuang, delves into the power and the warfare of a war that doesn’t seem to end. 

            Fang Runin “Rin” is still alive, but she’s without her troops, her allies, and her hand. Betrayed again by those who wanted to use her powers as a shaman for their goals, Rin decides to return to her home province in the south in order to liberate them from both the Dragon Republic and the Hesperians. There, she learns that her past actions have turned her into a living legend amongst the common people. And, they want to fight with her. Rin’s friends are Kitay, her friend from Sinegard, and Venka, her classmate and her former rival turned ally. Then, there’s Nezha, the son of the Dragon Lord, who is serving his family’s cause instead of Rin’s. While Nezha is Rin’s opponent, he isn’t the only antagonist Rin has to kill in order to liberate Nikan. However, will her new alliances led to more betrayal? Rin continues to develop in a way so that we can still root for her while trying to overlook the numerous atrocities she commits for liberation and for revenge. In Rin’s case, you can’t have one without the other. 

            Similar to the first 2 books in the trilogy, there are 3 parts in The Burning God; and, each part focuses on the antagonist(s) Rin must defeat to claim victory once and for all. Part I has Rin, Kitay, Venka, and what remains of their army marching into the Southern Provinces to liberate them from the Dragon Republic. Rin returns to Tikany for the first time since she left for Sinegard, and what she discovers there strengthens her conviction to transform Nikan into an independent nation. Rin’s new army consists of the common people and those who rebelled against the Dragon Republic. From them, Rin and her army are taught about elements of war that they didn’t learn at Sinegard. It turns out, guerilla warfare works for revolutionary purposes. But, what about against an invading nation? 

            Part II has Rin betrayed (again) and separated from her friends. From here, Rin makes an uneasy alliance with one of the last individuals she expected to see again. However, Rin knows this alliance this the only way to defeat both the Dragon Lord—Yin Vaisra, Nezha’s father—and the Hesperian fleet. During the march to regroup Rin’s troops and to rescue her friends, Rin learns the truth about her shaman powers and the Trifecta. Now, Rin has to decide where and who her loyalty lies with, and whether or not the end justifies the means.

            Part III has Rin and her army at full force. Rin, Kitay and Venka defeat all of their enemies and have liberated Nikan. However, the end of the war isn’t over until all hostile forces either surrender or die. In addition, Nikan has been ravaged by war for so long that there is no short-term plan for the survivors to carry on living. On top of that, Rin has the power and the recognition she always wanted, but like each war leader in (our) history, Rin struggles to maintain power and control for herself. All Rin has to do is weed out the remnants of her enemies—including Nezha—and find a resource to make Nikan self-sufficient in the years to come. Unfortunately, war is NOT a game, and it doesn’t end until all of the foes from one side are dead. 

            In addition to the plots in each Part in the novel, there are several subplots which enhance both the narrative and the character development. Some of the subplots include: the destruction of Speer, the fragility of the Trifecta, the Yin Family, Rin’s return to Tikany, and shamanism. All of the subplots tie in the plots of this story as it reaches its end. The characters’ story arcs end in ways that match the mood of the series, which is a combination of shocking and appropriate. Not only do these subplots wrap up the plots going back to the first book in the series, but also presents the conflicts all of the characters face throughout (and before) it. 

            The narrative is in 3rd person limited, which means readers learn everything going on from Rin’s point-of-view and from her stream-of-consciousness. The latter is essential because readers are able to understand why Rin makes the choices—both good and bad—throughout the narrative. It should be mentioned that there are a Prologue, an Epilogue, and 2 Chapters which are not told from Rin’s P.O.V. These serve as memory sequences which enhance the story and the conflicts, and lets readers know what Rin is up against. The narrative is what drives the story; it is well-written, and it can be followed by the readers easily. 

            The style R.F. Kuang uses in The Burning God brings The Poppy War Trilogy to a full circle. As the author ends the series, she reintroduces everything from The Poppy War and The Dragon Republic in order to remind her readers about the cost and the effect of war. In addition, this finale presents grimdark through a historical lens. After the release of The Dragon Republic, Kuang announced the historical figure Rin was supposed to represent. Anyone who is familiar with what happened in China after the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937-45), knows what Rin’s victory could mean for Nikan. The mood in this novel is puissance; it is a non-stop power struggle from start to end. The tone in this novel is the evanescence of power; the effects of war last much longer than an individual’s power and influence. 

            The appeal for The Burning God have been positive. Fans and readers who have stuck with this series will not be disappointed with the story’s conclusion. Fans of historical fantasy, military fiction and revenge stories—The Priory of the Orange Tree, The Rage of Dragons and Nevernight, respectively—will enjoy this book (and series) the most. There have been criticism of this book due to the realistic violence portrayed throughout the trilogy. However, this portrayal of warfare and of violence is the reality within the fiction, sadly. As I mentioned in a previous post, this series is the most similar to George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire series—and, maybe Joe Abercrombie’s books (I haven’t read them yet, but I will very soon)—so, his fans might enjoy this series as well. I listened to the audiobook edition of this book, and the narrator, Emily Woo Zeller, did an amazing job.

            The Burning God is a blazing finale to a series that started off as a school fantasy, transformed into a military historical fantasy, and ends as a grimdark series. R.F. Kuang delivers a powerful end to a series with Asian roots and influence. Do not wait as long as I did to read this book, you have no idea on what you’re missing out on. 

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!!!

P.S. Thank you Sasha for getting me to finish this trilogy through out buddy read!

Reading Check-In: September 17, 2021

What book have you finished reading recently?

One series on my list is complete. And, I stick with what I said about this series in my ASoIaF Read-Alike Book Recommendations: this series is the most “identical” to George R.R. Martin’s.

Another fun read by this author. And yes, it’s full of folklore and fantasy references!

What are you reading currently?

TorDotCom Publishing surprised me with a physical ARC of this hyped debut gothic novel and it moved to the top of my reading list!

I am listening to the audiobook of this space opera trilogy finale, and it’s AMAZING!

In addition, I’m reading the finalists for the SCKA 2021 Award Finalists. If you want to know which books/stories were voted by the other jury members and myself, then you can read the post (last week’s) here.

Not all of the nominees, but you get the idea.

What will you read next?

Just like several other readers, I’ve been waiting for this book to be released!

This book will be the next audiobook I plan on listening to/reading.

Future Posts: My 200th Blog Post is upcoming! What am I doing to mark that milestone? You have to wait and see!

Look for me at FIYAH Con 2021!

SCKA 2021: The Nominees, the Finalists & the Experience

One of the best things about being a bookblogger is the book awards. Besides the “big awards” such as the Hugo and the Nebula Awards—which many of us have read at least half of the nominees—there are the SPFBO and the SPSFC—which gives bookbloggers and (indie) reviewers the chance to propel indie books towards more readers. How many of you have heard of SCKA? Well, I didn’t until I was asked to participate on the jury this year.

            SCKA stands for Subjective Chaos Kind of Awards, which was started by bookbloggers. This year, I was asked to participate as one of the judges. Even though I had some other things going on at the same time—i.e. grad school—I said yes. This has been a fun yet tense experience because there is a process that must be followed. It makes you have a stronger appreciation for the other literary awards.  

            First, was the categories. There are 12 of us, including myself, who make up the jury and we agreed on which categories we all wanted to include for these awards. We agreed on: fantasy, science fiction, blurred (a.k.a. genre blended), debut work, series, novella and short fiction. Next, we all had the opportunity to nominate a work for each category; but, there was a catch: if we nominated for a category, then we had to read ALL of the nominees. Some of us had to remember how much we could read within a given time. So no, I didn’t participate in the 1st round voting in every category. 

            As you can observe from this chart: we all nominated on our nominees while making sure we didn’t nominate the same book, the same series, or the same stories. For the short fiction, we all made sure sources—either links or anthology titles—were provided for everyone so they could access them. 

Here are the nominees for each category (I apologize for the list, but I couldn’t format the Excel chart onto WordPress):

Fantasy:

The Once and Future Witches by Alix E. Harrow

The Midnight Bargain by C.L. Polk

Comet Weather by Liz Williams

The Wolf of Oren-Yaro by K.S. Villoso

Black Sun by Rebecca Roanhorse

The House in the Cerulean Sea by T.J. Klune

Sci-Fi:

Deal with the Devil by Kit Rocha

Nophek Gloss by Essa Hansen

The Vanished Birds by Simon Jimenez

Goldilocks by Laura Lam

Repo Virtual by Corey S. White

Blurred:

The City We Became by N.K. Jemisin

The Bone Shard Daughter by Andrea Stewart

Harrow the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir

Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

Interior Chinatown by Charles Yu

Debut:

A Song of Wraiths and Ruin by Roseanne A. Brown

Legendborn by Tracy Deonn

The Scapegracers by Hannah Abigail Clarke

The Space Between Worlds by Micaiah Johnson

Cemetery Boys by Aiden Thomas

The Year of the Witching by Alexis Henderson

Raybearer by Jordan Ifueko

Series:

Dominion of the Fallen by Aliette de Bodard

Islands of Blood and Storm by Kacen Callender

Sweet Black Waves by Kristina Perez

The Poppy War Trilogy by R.F. Kuang

The Daevabad Trilogy by S.A. Chakraborty

Witches of Lychford by Paul Cornell

Novella:

Upright Women Wanted by Sarah Gailey

The Four Profound Weaves by R.B. Lemberg

The Empress of Salt and Fortune by Nghi Vo

Riot Baby by Tochi Onyebuchi

Sweet Harmony by Claire North

Ring Shout by P. Djeli Clark

Short Fiction:

“Tiger Lawyer Gets It Right” by Sarah Gailey

“Convergence in Chorus Architecture: by Dare Segun Falowo

“In Kind” by Kayla Whaley

“Volumes” by Laura Duerr

“You Perfect, Broken Thing” by C.L. Clark

“Yellow and the Perception of Reality” by Maureen F. McHugh

“Juice Like Wounds” by Seanan McGuire

Then, we read, and we read, and we read some more. 

Recently, we voted on our finalists. The finalists were determined based on votes, and whichever nominees received the highest and the 2nd highest (or, in some cases, the 3rd highest) votes moved on to the finalists round.

Here are the finalists for each category based on the most votes:

Fantasy:

The Once and Future Witches by Alix E. Harrow

The Midnight Bargain by C.L. Polk

Sci-Fi:

The Space Between Worlds by Micaiah Johnson

Goldilocks by Laura Lam

Blurred:

Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

The Bone Shard Daughter by Andrea Stewart (tie)

Interior Chinatown by Charles Yu (tie)

Debut:

Legendborn by Tracy Deonn

Cemetery Boys by Aiden Thomas (tie)

The Year of the Witching by Alexis Henderson (tie)

Series:

The Poppy War Trilogy by R.F. Kuang

Dominion of the Fallen by Aliette de Bodard

Novella:

Ring Shout by P. Djeli Clark

The Empress of Salt and Fortune by Nghi Vo

Short Fiction:

“You Perfect, Broken Things” by C.L. Clark (Uncanny Magazine, #32)

“Yellow and the Perception of Reality” by Maureen F. McHugh (Tor.com)

            Please note: the finalists do NOT take away from the rest of the nominees AT ALL! In comparison to the rest of the nominees, the finalists stood out the most. Now, we have to read ALL of the finalists to determine the winner for each category. Unlike the nominees, all of the judges are allowed to participate in voting for the finalists in any or in all of the categories. This means that all of the finalists must be read by each juror before voting, which is fair. You can expect an announcement of the winners within the next couple of months.

            Which one will be voted as the winners of SCKA 2021? Stick around and find out!

Why You Need to Read: “The Empire’s Ruin”

Ashes of the Unhewn Throne, #1: The Empire’s Ruin

By: Brian Staveley

Published: July 6, 2021

Genre: Epic Fantasy

            “But it can’t be coincidence, can it? The Annurians burn down the Purple Baths and then, the very next morning, these naked fools show up talking about an attacking army,” (5). 

            When an individual reads a work of fiction, it is said that the reader is transported to that world—either ours or a fantastic one—as they become immersed in the narrative. In addition, there are some stories which remind readers of other things ranging from emotions to music. These moments of empathy allows readers to gain some comprehension of what the author was expressing as they wrote the story. Now, there are moments when the interpretation by the audience is wrong, but whatever they concluded should be acknowledged by the creator(s). After I was convinced to read The Empire’s Ruin—the 1st book in the Ashes of the Unhewn Throne trilogy—by Brian Staveley by another bookblogger, immediately, I was sucked into the narrative, and the 1812 Overture by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky played on loop in my head as I read this epic fantasy. 

            There are 3 protagonists in this novel who are part of a large dramatis personae, all who are part of the events that start to unfold from the 1st chapter. The first protagonist is Gwenna Sharpe, the former Commander of the Kettral Wing. Why “former” Commander? It is because Gwenna’s reckless behavior and her ability to ignore direct orders led to the deaths of a few of her comrades, and the death of the last (known) kettral—large birds used by the Annurian military for battle and other missions. Emperor Adare hui’Malkeenian strips Gwenna of her rank, but orders her to go on a voyage to Menkiddoc—a mysterious continent with ties to the present day Annurian Empire—on an expedition to retrieve kettral eggs. Accompanying Gwenna is the Royal Chief Historian, Kiel, who has extensive knowledge of both Menkiddoc and the Csestriim—a race of individuals who were wiped out by the Annurians thousands of years ago; First Admiral Jonan lem Jonan is the commander of the fleet and the expedition—who serves as Gwenna’s foil as well; the legionaries, Cho Lu and Pattick, who are fans of Gwenna’s “heroics”; during the expedition, the party meets Bhurma Dhar—the former Captain of a Manjari ship; and, an orphaned girl who may or may not know that whereabouts of the current residents of Menkiddoc. The entire crew have a lot to lose on this voyage and everything is hanging on the victory of this mission. However, Gwenna Sharpe needs more than the Emperor’s orders for her to remember what her purpose is to the Annurian Empire. 

            The second protagonist is Ruc Lakatur Lan Luc, a priest of Eria—Lady of Love. Ruc was raised among the Vuo Ton—a race of people from Dombâng who live in the delta which is as dangerous as the Vuo Ton’s way of life—but, he left that life 15 years earlier. Now, as a priest who practices love and pacifism, Ruc finds himself worried that recent events—the attack by the Annurians—is starting to unravel the instincts of his past. The recent attack has led to violence and riots in the name of numerous religions within the city of Dombâng. The followers of Eria are few, but Ruc and the other priests and priestesses—including Bien Qui Nai, Ruc’s girlfriend—do all they can to practice and to keep their faith. During a beatdown, Ruc and Bien come across a naked man who preaches that his god is “the First” and will overtake all of the other ones. This encounter causes Ruc to return to the Vuo Tun to gain some possible answers. After Ruc’s suspicions are confirmed, he rushes back to Eira’s Temple to find followers of other faiths attacking it. Ruc and Bien barely escape only to be arrested on charges of heresy. Their “punishment” is to participate in the fighting at the Arena. Their trainer is Goatface, who pairs Ruc and Bien with a captured Annurian soldier as a trio. Theirs is not the only group Goatface trains; there is the trio made up of Mouse, Monster and Stupid, who don’t seem to mind fighting in the Arena. Ruc must re-educate himself on how to survive in a hostile environment as he clings to his faith. 

            The third protagonist is Akiil, a former thief and “former” Shin monk of Ashk’lan. In fact, Akiil studied with the monks alongside Kaden, the brother of the reigning Emperor of Annur, who was the Heir Apparent before his “death.” Akiil meets with the Emperor so that he can attempt to con her. He hopes to do this by providing the Emperor with information about the kenta—a practice developed by the Csestriim and taught among the Shin monks—and its gates. Akiil’s plan is to “teach” the Emperor how to use the kenta in order to gain riches for himself. The Emperor is interested in the kenta because she wasn’t taught how to use it because she wasn’t the (original) heir to the Empire. However, with her brother dead and she without the knowledge, the Emperor may have some use of Akiil. The question isn’t who can use the kenta, but why the 2 opposite individuals want to use it. It turns out that while Akiil’s plan started off with him being a thieving monk, a person from his past alters his reasons for doing the job; but, what about the Emperor’s conviction for the knowledge? Will that affect Akiil and his plans? 

            There are 3 plots in this novel, and they are as complex as the characters. The first plot surrounds the Kettral. The birds are extinct in Annur, so the Emperor arranges for an expedition to search for them elsewhere. The second plot focuses on the in-fighting in Dombâng about religion—which god or gods are the most powerful? Which faith “deserves” to be practiced? The third plot delves into the knowledge the Emperor seeks, which is offered to her by a “thieving monk.” It seems that neither the thieving monk nor the Emperor should have this knowledge, but this is the least of their problems. There are 3 subplots in this novel as well. The first subplot involves the Csestriim. Their race is extinct; and yet, for some reason, the knowledge of the Csestriim could help Annur—the Kettral and the kenta—from destruction. The second subplot delves into magic and abilities a few characters can use. Unfortunately, not only are these powers esoteric, but also the users are ostracized by the majority of the world’s denizens. Why is that? The third subplot focuses on the new faith that is starting to emerge in Dombâng (and in Annur). The followers claim their god is the most powerful, but something is off about the followers—which, is something all of the other religious groups agree on. 

            The narrative occurs in the present tense and is told from multiple points-of-view of the protagonists: Gwenna Sharpe, Ruc and Akiil. The narrative is in the 3rd person limited which limits the story to what each protagonist is experiencing (and their knowledge) through their streams-of-consciousness and their memories. All of their experiences, flaws and mistakes, emotions make all of the protagonists reliable narrators. And, as long as the narrative is, it can be followed by the reader(s) easily.

            The style Brian Staveley uses for The Empire’s Ruin enhances the epic fantasy experience for the reader(s). At the beginning of this review, I mentioned how this story had me humming the 1812 Overture by Tchaikovsky. The reason for this is because the 1st chapter is a battle sequence, and Tchaikovsky’s musical piece is a tale about Russia’s defeat of Napoleon’s invading army. What is an overture? An overture is defined as “an orchestral piece at the beginning of an opera, suite, or other extended composition (in the 17th century).” And, that is what the author has written, an epic fantasy that is just the beginning of what will be an admirable opera (Note: I didn’t study music theory). All of the narratives are part of the bigger story to come, and Brian Staveley wrote this story in a way that it is not too long, but with enough details to capture the readers’ attention. The mood in this novel is pugnacious. All of the protagonists find themselves in atmospheres or in situations where they must be ready to fight. Even if they don’t want to, they don’t have a choice because their survival depends on it. The tone in this novel is diversion. All of the fighting throughout Annur and Dombâng is drawing attention away from the threats that have started to appear. In fact, the threats have made their “proclamations” known to certain crowds, but to no avail. It seems that the protagonists and their comrades know the severity of these threats. Also, if you need to, then you can consult the maps located at the beginning of the book. 

            The appeal for The Empire’s Ruin have been positive. So far, the 500+ ratings on Goodreads have 4- and 5-star reviews which make up 89% of the total ratings. Now, don’t be turned off by the quantity of the reviewers, but pay attention to the quality of those reviews. Regardless of the amount of reviews the book has so far, it can’t be overlooked that almost all of the readers keep raving about it. This book is not only the first in a new epic fantasy series, but also is part of the saga of the Annurian Empire which started with the Chronicle of the Unhewn Throne series—no, I haven’t read that series, yet. In other words, fans of Robin Hobb, Joe Abercrombie, Brandon Sanderson and Melissa Caruso will enjoy this book—and, the upcoming books in this series—the most. This series will continue the expansive world-building that started with the author’s previous books. There is something you should know about this novel. Brian Staveley rewrote this entire book after his agent told him that the first draft “wasn’t good enough.” I’m glad (and, so are several other readers) that the author listened to his agent (I wonder if it was the same agent who told V.E. Schwab to rewrite her draft of Vengeful?). Obviously, it wasn’t an easy thing to do, but this book is the result and that’s a good thing. Whenever the next book in this series is released, I will be reading it!

            The Empire’s Ruin is the first book in a new series that is an expansion of a fantasy world fans and other readers of the speculative fiction genre have praised for years. This novel is an excellent place for newcomers to start reading about the Annurian Empire. Brian Staveley has written one of the best (and one of the most underrated) books of the year. This novel is the 1st in what’s to come in this epic fantasy, which will remind readers of a musical overture. You don’t believe me? Then, read both the first and the last chapters in this book with the 1812 Overture playing in the background, and let me know what you think. 

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!!!

Thank you to Tor (Books) and to Brian Staveley for sending me an eARC of this book in exchange for an honest review!

Why You Need to Read: “The Gilded Ones”

The Gilded Ones, #1: The Gilded Ones

By: Namina Forna

Published: February 9, 2021

Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy

TRIGGER WARNING: This book contains elements of rape, misogyny, familicide, dismemberment, human trafficking, and violence against females. Be advised.

            Confusion lines my face, and I frown at her. “An invitation for what?”

            “For you, Impure One. Emperor Gezo has decided to create an army of your kind. He invites you to join it and protect our beloved Otera from those that would oppose her will,” (3).

            Readers have become familiar with genre-blending—the blending of at least 2 distinguished genres and/or subgenres within a book or a book series—but, every now and then there are books which are “crossovers” for the audience. For example, consider which books you had to read in secondary school for your literature class. You know many of those books were written for adults, right? And yet, many adolescents have at least 1 book from school that they remembered reading, and some even enjoyed the story. There are several examples of books written for adults that should NOT be read by younger readers—The Nevernight Chronicle by Jay Kristoff—but, there are several young adult books containing numerous adult themes that should be read both by adolescents and by adults as well. The Gilded Ones by Namina Forna is the latest book to tackle how the “adult world” influences the youth negatively and why certain societal practices continue to exist through posterity. 

            The protagonist is Deka. She is 16 years-old and is about to undergo the “Ritual of Purity,” a rite to see if a female’s blood runs red or gold. If a girl’s blood runs red, then she is declared a woman and becomes a member of the village they reside in. Deka has become even more terrified of the Ritual since her mother’s death 3 months earlier; her father is the last family member she has left. However, she has 2 close friends who she envisions remaining close to after she passes the Ritual. Unfortunately, 2 events occur on the day of the Ritual that changes Deka’s life. First, her village is attacked by creatures known as Deathshrieks who kill several people. Second, her blood runs gold—the blood of the Impure—and she is ordered to be “cleanse…” that is until a figure—a woman with white hands—arrives with an offer to reclaim her identity: join the emperor’s army of Impure women to defeat the Deathshrieks for good, or be sentenced to death. Almost immediately, Deka leaves her fanatical village for a chance at “absolution.” Along the way, Deka meets and befriends Britta from the Northern Province. Once at the compound, she meets twin sisters, Adwapa and Asha from the Southern Province; Belcalis from the Western Province; and, Gazal and Jeneba their “Honored Elder or Senior Bloodsisters” who help the girls with their training and to become acclimated with their new life. Then, there is Keita, an uruni—(human) men partnered with each of the girls to work together with (and to spy on) the women as they fight against the Deathshrieks. Last, is White Hands, the Impure woman who brought Deka and Britta to the compound for a chance at absolution; but, she has a close relationship with the Emperor, and she has an interest in Deka, and Deka doesn’t know why. All of these characters help Deka accept her new life and her purpose as she becomes stronger—physically, mentally and emotionally—and determined to protect Otera. 

            The plot of this novel has several parts. First, is Deka’s journey towards absolution after her blood classifies her as a demon. Second, is the explanation of the “Infinite Wisdoms,” the religious mandate practiced in most of the provinces in Otera, which limits the roles of females to their families and their households; but, an army of Impure Ones has existed for some time. Last, is the world-building that occurs throughout the narrative including the various provinces of Otera, the history of Otera—including the goddesses and the Infinite Father. There are 2 subplots in this novel. The first is about the Deathshrieks. What are they? Why have they been attacking villages? Why have their numbers continued to grow? The second subplot is about the “Impure Ones,” or “demons” who are descended from the Gilded Ones—the goddesses who founded Otera. It seems that there are some unknown benefits to being “impure,” which are known by those who are “impure.” In addition, why are all the “Impure Ones” female? What about males? These subplots are essential to the plots as the reader(s) learn more about the characters and the world through them and their conflicts. The plots and the subplots go at an appropriate rate as the story reveals everything that will happen in it.

            The narrative is in 1st person from Deka’s point-of-view. And, the narrative is presented in the present tense. This means that the reader experiences everything and learns about everything through Deka’s P.O.V. and her stream-of-consciousness. Deka’s growth from devout outcast to lead warrior—including some revelations about herself—make her a reliable narrator. A reminder that the narrative is intended for young adult readers, and it can be followed easily by both YA and adult readers. 

            The style Namina Forna uses for The Gilded Ones is NOT new, but it is one of the most candid seen in (YA) literature for some time. The author wanted to examine the idea of the patriarchy—how and why it is practiced—and how religion continues to influence this societal practice. Namina Forna is from Sierra Leone and—when she moved to the U.S.—she saw no difference in the practice of patriarchy between Africa and America. And, given what many of us know about similar practices in the rest of our world (i.e. Asia, the Middle East, etc.), this book is a commentary on how females continue to be treated throughout the world. Feminism and misogyny are international themes and issues that continue to permeate into individuals worldwide. Personally, I believe that one of the reasons “change” and “equality” haven’t happened for women yet is because every region of the world acts like gender equality is “better” where they are; and that is a HUGE lie. Namina Forna presents the harsh reality females—especially young ones—face because some males desire to express their dominance over them. Regardless of age, race, sexuality, gender identity, religion, or ethnicity, this book speaks volumes of what girls and women experience throughout their lives. The mood in this novel is domination. The females are dominated by the males and their religion, even the “Impure Ones” are oppressed by men. The tone in this novel is belligerence. The “Impure Ones” are trained to fight their foes, but are they limited to the Deathshrieks? There is a map of Otera at the front of the book and it should be used by the reader(s) whenever they need to consult it. 

            The appeal for The Gilded Ones have been mostly positive with 75% of the ratings on Goodreads being 4- and 5-stars. One thing that needs to be mentioned is the book’s publication. This book’s release was delayed due to the COVID-19 Pandemic. That being said, the hype surrounding the author’s debut novel made the wait worth it (I read an eARC of this book). This book is described as being for fans of Children of Blood and Bone, Shadow and Bone, Legendborn and Raybearer. I would describe The Gilded Ones as a combination of The Year of the Witching and Speak. Once again, this book is written for YA readers containing “adult” themes they know exist in our world. Not everyone will view this book for what it is, and that’s all right because it means that the book wasn’t written for them. The next book in this series—The Merciless Ones, which releases in April 2022—continues Deka’s journey to discovering her role within the Impure Ones and warring against those who want her dead.

            The Gilded Ones is the book young girls crave and adult women wished they had as children. Namina Forna found a way to present the truth within the fiction for adolescent readers, but made it alluring for adult readers as well. While this book should NOT be read by everyone, it should NOT be missed by anyone. Go and read one of the best (debut) novels of this year!

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!!!

Why You Need to Read: “The House of Always”

A Chorus of Dragons, #4: The House of Always

By: Jenn Lyons                                                                       

Published: May 11, 2021                                                        

Genre: Fantasy                                                                                             

Thank you Tor for sending me an eARC of this book. I listened to excerpts of the audiobook, too.

Note: There are a few spoilers from the first three books in A Chorus of Dragons series. 

            After I have my answers. Time moves differently here. Only seconds will have passed when we return. There’s no need to hurry. There’s no point, (3: Secret Plans, Teraeth’s reaction).

            The beginning of the end has begun in this series. The climax occurred at the end of the last book—The Memory of Souls—yet the consequences of the actions and the choices in the previous chronicle must play out before the story can reach its conclusion. The House of Always is that book in A Chorus of Dragons; and A LOT happens before the story can begin to end. 

            If you believed the Dramatis Personae was long in the previous book, then be ready for even more callbacks in this one. Thanks to Senera, Kihrin D’Mon, Janel Thernanon, Tereath and Thurvishar D’Lorus reunite with Galen and Sheloran D’Mon, Qown, Kalindra Milligreest, Talea, Xivan and Talon. They all “meet up” after the battle that took place in the previous book in order to discuss their recent activities, the latest threat to Quur, and the upcoming threat(s) to the entire world. The last, of course, involves both Relos Var and Vol Karoth; so, what’s the plan? Each character has been busy with their own tasks, then—through magic—they find themselves inside an unusual place where they have a lot of time to sought through all of their thoughts—and those of their adversaries. 

            There are 2 plots in this story, and they involve 2 current conflicts. The first plot involves Kihrin’s “plans” for confronting Vol Karoth, which is easier said than done. The second plot delves into the current threat to Quur, which is something none of the protagonists or the main characters know anything about; or, do they? These plots are linked due to the most obvious reason, that 1 dilemma has to be resolved before the other one can be confronted. Meanwhile, there are several subplots within the story, and they are ALL relevant and essential to the plots of the story. All of the missions, the tasks, and the memories of ALL of the characters are linked to the ongoings throughout the rest of the Quuros Empire and the potential way to save it. 

            Once again, the narrative in this book is different from the narratives in the previous books. That being said, by now readers of this series should be familiar with the author’s narrative style. There are 2 Parts in this book; and, while the 1st 2 chapters in Part I and all of Part II are told in the present, the remainder of the narrative jumps back-and-forth amongst memories, flashbacks, previous lives, and streams-of-consciousness of ALL of the characters! In fact, a handful of other characters reemerge in this book. Which ones, and why? There are numerous P.O.V. chapters and passages which follows ALL of the characters. However, Kihrin’s point-of-view is the only one told in 1st person. The rest of the characters’ P.O.V.s are in 3rd person limited. There is a reason for this narration, and it is presented as it progresses. This narrative style allows for further development of the plots, the characters, and the world-building. And, believe it or not, the characters are reliable narrators, and their narratives can be followed easily. 

            The style Jenn Lyons uses for The House of Always can be argued as it being an additional buildup before the finale in the last book in this series. The final battle in the war is approaching, and the Dramatis Personae must decide which side they are on. Unfortunately, neutrality is no longer an option, so a decision has to be made. Not to mention, “the plan” must be finalized and agreed upon by EVERYONE. The style presented by the author reminds the readers what is at stake as the series approaches its end. The mood in this novel is ominous. All of the characters know what’s coming, and they must remain vigilant—which is the tone in this novel—as the final battle draws near. Once again, the readers can refer to the maps, the glossary, and the appendices for whenever they need to consult any information.     

            The appeal for The House of Always have been positive. Readers and fans who read through this book in the series gave it high ratings (4- & 5-stars). This is the book in which all of the pieces and the subplots from the previous books reemerge in this one, right before the series reaches its dénouement. This epic fantasy series continues to be compared to ones written by George R.R. Martin, Brandon Sanderson, and other authors who write similar books in this subgenre. To fantasy fans and readers who are still indecisive on whether or not to read this series, DO IT! If you’re worried about remembering all of the characters, then know that their stories continue throughout the series. If you’re concerned about all of the plots and the subplots, then take notes (I do). If you’re worried about forgetting what happens in all of the books leading up to the last book in the series—The Discord of Gods—then, now is the time either to re-read the previous books in the series, or to join (or to create) a group for a read along of this series! You are running out of reasons for NOT reading this series!

            The House of Always is a unique story that gears up readers for the series’ conclusion. You might wonder as to whether or not the narrative style leads to an essential part of the plot, and it does that and so much more. All of the elements within this series begins to end as the story and the characters’ fates gets closer to it. Now, we must wait until 2022 to learn who survives the apocalypse. 

My Rating: Enjoy It (4.5 out of 5). 

Reading Check-In: July 31, 2021

What book have you finished reading recently?

O!M!G! This book…WOW!

I started reading this eARC at the beginning of the year, but I had to stop because of classes. It turns out that I stopped at the right spot because I was able to dive back into the story when the story, the plot and the characters continued to developed.

It’s not speculative fiction, but it’s still enjoyable so far. I haven’t watched the movie yet, but I did read some of the Sherlock Holmes books as a kid so I had high hopes for this book. This is the 7th book in the series and the only one I’ve read so far; and, it’s an excellent spinoff!

What are you reading currently?

I’ll be reading this book throughout the weekend. I don’t know whether or not I’ll finish it by then, but I expect to make some more progress.

There are 2 plots within this story, but it seems like only one of them will continue onto Book 2!

What will you read next?

There is a reason why I started reading this book, which I can’t get into yet. That being said, I should have tried to read the eARC I received when I had the time.

I should read this book before the next one in the series is released.

I haven’t forgotten about this book!

I want to read this book BEFORE its publication.

I know my list of books keeps getting shuffled, but I read what I want when I’m in the mood and when I have the time.

Why You Need to Read: These Books While Waiting for “The Winds of Winter”: Part II

Here we go again. It’s been almost 3 years since I complied the 1st list of book recommendations; and, we’re still waiting for The Winds of Winter, the next book in A Song of Ice and Fire series. Many of us continue to wait, patiently, for this book by reading similar books by authors who write fantasy stories. There have been numerous books released since I compiled my 1st list of recommendations; yet, I know some of the readers enjoyed the latest releases from Brandon Sanderson, Steven Erikson, etc. Within the last decade, several new authors have made a name for themselves through their works, and others have continued to release books for us to enjoy as well.

            This is my 2nd list of book recommendations for those who are waiting for George R.R. Martin to finish and to release the next book in his fantasy series. Please note that I couldn’t include all of the fantasy authors for this list, and there are a few “obvious” authors who are not on this list (i.e. Sanderson, Jordan). I am reading books by Joe Abercrombie and Ben Galley for the first time, so they will be on the next list I compile, hopefully. In addition, if there is an author you don’t see on this list, then please refer to the first one I’ve written and posted. 

  1. The Poppy War Trilogy by R.F. Kuang

This trilogy is a retelling of the Sino-Japanese War (1937-45) and is as grimdark as A Song of Ice and Fire. The story follows Rin, who studies to enroll into a prestigious military university to escape an arranged marriage and poverty. As she studies to become a soldier, Rin studies shamanism, which ignites a power linked to her heritage. Then, a war breaks out and Rin—and her classmates—soon realize that war is NOT what you learn in a classroom.

Based on the speculative fiction books I’ve read so far this series is the most identical to A Song of Ice and Fire. This is because the mood and the tone in both series follow both warfare and social mobility. The politics are the subplot which carries the narrative through the series in both the characters and the conflict.

2. The Daevabad Trilogy by S.A. Chakraborty

Fans of A Song of Ice and Fire have heard of this series because Martin has read this series and praised the author for her storytelling and for the narrative. This trilogy is a retelling of one of the tales from One Thousand and One Arabian Nights, and it is full of political intrigue and backstabbing. The world-building alone will keep you invested in this trilogy.

The trilogy follows 3 protagonists who represent different tribes with overlapping histories. As their heritages are revealed, so are the conflicts amongst those groups of individuals. And then, there are all the “mythical beings” mentioned throughout the series—the ones we heard about in tales such as Aladdin, Sinbad, etc.—play a role as well. In addition, the twists presented throughout the series could rival the ones written by Martin!

3. The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon

The standalone epic fantasy novel has everything A Song of Ice and Fire has in one massive tome: dragons, prophecies, secret societies, political conspiracies, strong female characters, and a historical timeline. While the story follows 3 female protagonists, there are points-of-view chapters from several other characters that will feel familiar to any and all fans of Martin’s series. And, before you ask: yes, there are a TON of references to historical events, many of which you will recall from your school days. 

4. Book of the Ancestor by Mark Lawrence

I would describe this trilogy to fans of Martin as a religious combative school for girls. While the protagonist will remind readers of Arya Stark, I would say these female characters resemble the Free Folk. These characters are strong, intelligent and combative females who are, or are training to become, nuns. 

This trilogy delves into the “idea” and the “expectation” of prophecies—especially the concept of “the chosen one”—how and why they come into existence, when they become relevant, and who they are about. In addition, this series presents a different look into “heritage.” Yes, political and social hierarchy play their roles in the narrative, but both magic and social hierarchy is inherited through blood. So young girls with magical abilities are sought after by these nuns so they can learn about their magic and how it relates to the religion they practice. And yes, there are plenty of battles that present these powers and fighting skills in action.

5. The Nevernight Chronicle by Jay Kristoff

I describe the protagonist in this trilogy as a female Kratos. For those of you who don’t play video games, you will be reminded of a bloodier and an angrier Arya Stark. From the opening pages, you can expect one of the ultimate tales of betrayal, family, vengeance, love, conspiracy, and murder—lots and lots of murder—from this trilogy. 

This trilogy is one-part dark fantasy and one part folklore. The magic in this series is as twisted as the foundation of the school of assassins the protagonist trains and then works for. And, if that’s not enough for you, then know that the footnotes are guaranteed to make you laugh. One final thing to know about this trilogy: IT’S NOT YA!!!

6. The Books of Ambha by Tasha Suri

Some of you might be reading this author’s latest book, The Jasmine Throne, but how many of you read her debut novel, Empire of Sand, and the sequel, Realm of Ash? This duology delves into colonialism, family relationships, colorism, buried history, magic, and political corruption and gameplay. The duology follows 2 sisters—one per book—who are the illegitimate daughters of the governor in a historical and a magical India. The sisters possess magical abilities which are coveted by both the royal family and their mystics. The elder sister reveals her magic, which leads to the mystics separating her from her family, leaving her younger sister behind. Several years later, the younger sister offers her services to the royal family where she learns about the dark history of the Empire and what happened to her sister. 

7. The Nine Realms by Sarah Kozloff

Anyone who is a fan of Tamora Pierce should pick up this series—think of following a strong female protagonist from childhood through early adulthood. This comparison is valid because instead of one thick tome, the author insisted on a binge-reading experience, providing readers with 4 novels: A Queen in Hiding, The Queen of Raiders, A Broken Queen, The Cerulean Queen. The story follows a princess who must live in exile after her mother—the Queen—uncovers a plot for her Council to seize power through the princess. The princess grows up amongst commoners, evades capture from her enemies, and makes allies along the way so that she can reclaim her family’s throne. 

This series will be enjoyed by those who’ve read the Dunk and Egg series (still incomplete). The protagonists travel and reside in the Nine Realms where each realm has its own culture and conflict. All of the plots, the characters and the conflicts revolve around individual realms, politicians, magic, gods, warfare, history and science. And yes, you must read one book after the other in order to grasp the entire experience. 

8. A Chorus of Dragons by Jenn Lyons

If you’re a fan of intricate world-building with matching histories that rival both Tolkien and Martin (yes, I said it), then, this series is for you! This series delves into prophecies, family trees (think of the Lannisters) and magical artifacts as the narration jumps back-and-forth between the past and the present with several characters to tell the story as it progresses. Did I mention the dragons? 

The series follows several characters from different regions of the world whose “circumstances” brings them together in order to save the world as per the prophecies. However, those “prophecies” are questioned by all of the characters—“who came up with them,” “are they relevant right now,” etc.—but, they understand that there is a force that will bring about the end-of-the-world, and they are the ones “chosen” to save it. Note: this is a 5-book series. 

9. The Black Iron Legacy by Gareth Hanrahan

This series started as a 4-book series and was announced recently that it will be a 5-book series. This series is part dark fantasy and part grimdark (NOT THE SAME SUBGENRE) in which the characters within the series who are morally gray must survive a harsh society (that reflect ours) and have a dark portrayal of magic. If the series needs more reason to be read, then know that there will be at least 1 character you will want to learn more about throughout your reading. 

Each book in the series focuses on a cast of characters who end up playing a pivotal role with events in their society, but not in the “traditional fantasy” narrative. Each of the characters have a backstory which in turn influences the reasons for the actions they take (sound familiar?). In addition, the gods—from various cultures throughout the world—are at war with each other for dominance; and, they need “vessels” to assist them with their plans. 

10. The Tide Child Trilogy by R.J. Barker

This series is about pirates, but not the ones from the movies or in real life. Fans of the nautical, and House Greyjoy, will appreciate this unique narrative of sea life and sea dragons. And no, this series is NOT like The Voyage of the “Dawn Treader.” These pirates are on these ships serving because they all committed crimes and were convicted of them.

As you may have guessed, this series isn’t about piracy, but about a crew who is on a mission to protect their home (even though they are no longer welcomed there) and to search for the source of their ships. This series offers an interesting look into life on the seas, which match the harsh lifestyles of the land dwellers. Not to mention, there are plenty of battle sequences that place you right in the middle of it all. This is one of the best nautical fantasy books yet!

11. Chronicles of the Bitch Queen by K.S. Villoso

You are the daughter of the Empire’s most notorious war lord, who on the eve before the coronation with your husband—the would-be king—he abandons you and your young son, which makes you “the Queen” while leaving you to deal with a new kingdom, numerous enemies, and parenthood by yourself. A few years later, your husband asks to meet in order to reconcile, in another country. After an attack by unknown enemies, you find yourself alone in a foreign land with no one to trust and with no way to return home. 

This series presents several political conspiracies which go back to before the protagonist was born. And, the narrative presents realistic scenarios with realistic dilemmas on what the protagonist must do if she wants to survive and to return home. Did I mention the queen is also a kickass warrior? 

12. The Burning by Evan Winter

Both fantasy and folklore mention the origins of dragons as from both Europe and East Asia. That being said, have you ever wondered whether or not dragons could have existed elsewhere (in our world)? Who said dragons couldn’t have come from Africa? If they did, then why haven’t we heard of them until now? 

The 1st book in this quartet—The Rage of Dragons—begins with a battle between 2 tribes—one of them has women who have the power to summon dragons. Then, the story heads in the direction of a military fantasy with a protagonist driven by vengeance (especially against the social hierarchy), which sees the pace of the narrative zoom until you realize that the series is about 2 warring nations and an in tribal struggle amongst social classes and magic users. This series will leave you with a new appreciation for battle sequences.  

13. The Poison War by Sam Hawke

This series is part political fantasy and part mystery. The 1st book in this series—City of Lies—follows a brother and a sister as they try to figure out who murdered the lord they serve and their uncle, who was his closest friend and his poisoner. That’s right, the plot of this novel delves into various poisons. So, fans of Dorne and the Red Viper will find this narrative very intriguing. 

This series delves into the world’s politics, civil war and lost magic. At the same time, the siblings must step into the roles they’ve trained for their entire lives. All the while, who poisoned their uncle and their lord, and why? 

14. The Legacy of the Mercenary Kings by Nick Martell

The newest book on this list focuses on a group of siblings who are struggling to survive after their family was stripped of their status after their father murdered the crown prince, supposedly. The protagonist—who is the younger brother—is determined to prove his father’s innocence. How is he going to do it? By re-entering the royal court and gaining the attention of the royal family, or what’s left of it.

The world in A Song of Ice and Fire has “unusual seasons” and this trilogy has a fractured moon. Fans of the former will enjoy the latter due to the political system, the political backstabbing (and there are A LOT of them), and the political corruption (A LOT of that, too). And, all of that doesn’t compare to the series’ magic system and the twist at the end of the 1st book. 

15. Die by Kieron Gillen, Stephanie Hans, Clayton Cowles, Rian Hughes & Chrissy Williams

I would describe this graphic novel series as a cross between Jumanji and Dungeons and Dragons. The premise of this series follows 6 high schoolers who meet up to play D&D only to disappear for 3 years; then, 5 of them return to our world. 20 years later, the players reunite when a package arrives for them, which returns them back into the “game.” 

So far, this is an on-going series, which narrates the darker side of a fantasy world. The images illustrate the world the main characters are trapped in. However, the story is about these traumatized individuals, their dual personalities, and their desires. Kieron Gillen has written numerous graphic novels, and this series is character driven that is similar to A Song of Ice and Fire. If you’re a fan of this graphic novelist and you haven’t started reading this series, then you’re missing out on an excellent one! 

            As you can see, there is a reason why it took me a while to compile a 2nd list of recommendations. And no, I was not able to add more books and/or series to this list without it being too long. That being said, I am reading my way through other books I hope to recommend in a future post. Hopefully, by then it will be when we’re waiting for A Dream of Spring to be released. Not to mention, many of these “in-progress” series should be completed by that time as well. 

            If it does come to another list, then I hope to have one compiled of books and series by indie authors; and, I believe you have an idea of which ones I might include on that list. And yes, they’ll be another list because there are so many more books to read and to enjoy as we continue to wait for Martin to finish writing his series, patiently.

            Which books and/or series do you recommend reading while waiting for the next book in this series? 

Why You Need to Read: “The Bone Shard Daughter”

The Drowning Empire, #1: The Bone Shard Daughter

By: Andrea Stewart

Published: September 8, 2020

Genre: Fantasy

            I knew who I was. I was Lin. I was the Emperor’s daughter. I shouted the words in my head, but I didn’t say them. Unlike my father, I kept my face neutral, my thoughts hidden. Sometimes he liked it when I stood up for myself, but this was not one of those times. It never was, when it came to my past, (1: Lin: Imperial Island).

            Pace is an interesting concept; all of our lives we’ve been told about “pacing” ourselves when it comes to doing everything from completing everyday tasks to taking a test to reading books. Pace is referred to in storytelling; the “pace” of the story can keep the reader either engaged or lost. The Bone Shard Daughter, the first book in The Drowning EmpireTrilogy and the debut novel of the author, Andrea Stewart, was written in a way that the story’s pace kept me engaged to where I read the entire book within a week!

            There are 3 protagonists in this novel. The first protagonist, is Lin, the daughter of the Emperor. Although she should be the heir apparent, she hasn’t earned that title for 2 reasons. One, she lost many of her memories due to an illness she had as a child. Her father gives her tests daily to determine what Lin can remember, which isn’t a lot. Two, Lin has been falling behind on her bone constructs, which has put her foster brother, Bayan, ahead of her. If Lin cannot recall what she has forgotten and doesn’t pick up her work on bone constructs, then she’ll lose her position to Bayan. The second protagonist, is Jovis, a merchant turned pirate. Jovis went from merchant to smuggler after his wife, Emahla, disappeared from their home several years earlier. Since then, Jovis has been searching for leads on his wife while avoiding capture by the Emperor’s soldiers and some individuals he owes money. However, the closer Jovis gets to solving the mystery surrounding his wife, the closer he gets to uncovering a dark truth. The last protagonist, is Phalue, the daughter of a governor. Phalue is in an interesting situation, she understands that her father’s political policies doesn’t make him a popular governor, which is something her girlfriend, Ranami, reminds her over and over again. Phalue has to figure out the type of leader she wants to become before she gets caught up in a potential uprising against her father. All of these protagonists (and the other characters they interact with) are complex individuals who have to maneuver their way through politics and matters of the heart so they can become the people they want to be. 

            There are 2 main plots in this novel. The first plot surrounds bone shards, which are collected from the citizens of the Empire as children—known as ‘the Tithing’—as  ordered by the Emperor. Eventually, these bone shards are used by the Emperor as part of his magic to create bone constructs, which are used to protect both the Empire and the Emperor, so says the Emperor. The second plot delves into the political atmosphere which lead to rebellions. There is no such thing as a perfect government system, but it seems that each setting presents an inevitable uprising. There is one subplot in this novel, and it surrounds the cost of magic. Lin and Jovis know from experience the cost of bone shard magic. And yet, they continue to carry on their personal campaigns because they don’t know what else to do. But, how long can they ignore the “bigger” problem? 

            The narrative is told from multiple points-of-view in the present tense. The narratives are told from Lin’s and Jovis’ P.O.V. in the 1st person, and from Phalue’s P.O.V. in the 3rd person limited. It is from their narratives that the readers learn about the world and the societies they inhabit. Their streams-of-consciousness (and some memories) make these characters reliable narrators whose narrations can be followed easily. Not to mention, any additional P.O.V. characters should NOT be overlooked throughout the narrative. 

            The style Andrea Stewart uses in The Bone Shard Daughter is a combination of dark magic and political corruption. In similar dark fantasy stories, the two go hand-in-hand often, but it’s not the case in this novel. There is enough occurring that the two corruptions overlap each other while still remaining 2 separate threats. The mood in this novel is mystery. Why are bone shards collected? Is there an actual threat? Why are the Emperor and the politicians unaware of their citizens’ plights? The tone in this novel is rebellion. It is obvious that both Lin and Phalue are rebelling against their families (and committing treason), but Jovis’ rebellion is against the entire Empire. How long will their rebellions last before their actions catch up to them? In fact, shouldn’t they be focused on “bigger” things? 

            The appeal for The Bone Shard Daughter have been positive. Several readers have given this book 4- and 5-star ratings! This novel is one of the latest in Asian-inspired fantasy and is an excellent addition to the speculative fiction canon. As I mentioned earlier, I read this book in a week (and, I participated in a livestream with the author)! One of the reasons for this is because the story is very engaging, and the last 50 pages will have you waiting to read the book’s sequel, The Bone Shard Emperor, when it releases later this year!

            The Bone Shard Daughter is an amazing and an engaging debut novel that is a blend of anime and older horror stories. This Asian-inspired dark fantasy gives readers some from all familiar tropes and more. Andrea Stewart presents a story with characters who drive the narrative, who live in oppressive societies controlled by magic, and whose rebellions can trigger the change or the destruction that is needed.

My Rating: Enjoy It (4.5 out of 5).