Speculative Fiction Books that Kept My Interest in the Genre

Please note the title of this post refers to books! I will write a separate list containing movies, TV shows and video games related to speculative fiction sometime in the future. And, expect that list to consist of “originals,” not just media adaptations of books. Also, these are NOT my favorite speculative fiction books of all-time! I’m not even sure I can make a list without changing it every year; hence why I do an annual list.

            Everyone has a favorite genre of literature (and films, video games, etc.), but has it occurred to you why and how that came to be? Did someone introduce you to the genre? Was it an author’s book—or, several of them—that hooked your passion for the genre? Was it a pop culture moment? In other words, do you remember the moment—or, the story—that got you into your favorite genre(s)? This question can be asked of any format or medium, but I thought about which books got me into speculative fiction and how it influenced my love and my appreciation for the genre. It did take some time to think back on what I’ve read since I was a kid, but I realized that some of the books released in the past decade have been just as influential as the ones I’ve read growing up.

            I’ve managed to compile a list of 10 books/series that influenced my love for the speculative fiction genre. Please know that I listed the books in the chronological order I read them regardless of the book’s publication date. The reasons for this is obvious. I hope you read and enjoy them as much as I did. 

  1. Animorphs by K.A. Applegate

I’m a 90s kid, and there were several book series for kids—The Babysitter’s Club, Goosebumps, etc.—but, I remember when the debut book in this series was released. I was 10 years-old, still in elementary school, and intrigued by the book’s cover: a boy changing from human to animal (a lizard). The story was about a group of friends who are given powers to change into animals by a dying alien in order to fight an invasion against a race of hostile aliens. This sci-fi series was the first book series in which I had to learn how to wait patiently for a book to be written and released when I wanted to devour the next one immediately. At the same time, this series introduced me to the blending of both the science fiction and the paranormal genres. Even though I didn’t know what paranormal was at the time, I knew this was different from other alien media I consumed with an explanation of D.N.A., permanent consequences, and the difficulties in balancing family, school, and saving the world. Animorphs was my first obsessive book series. 

2. Haroun and the Sea of Stories by Salman Rushdie

I’m in 9th grade and one of many students who participated in an optional reading course through our English class. Two of my best friends participated in this course with me. However, the three of us chose different books to read during the second quarter. I can’t remember what one friend chose, but my other friend was upset with us for not selecting The Once and Future King by T.H. White. Why? Well, the description of Haroun and the Sea of Stories by Salman Rushdie was more intriguing to me: a boy whose father loses the source of his stories, and he’s a storyteller. The boy, Haroun, goes on a journey to find out what happened to the “source” of the stories. The story is a twist on fairy tale tropes and fantastical elements with rounded characters and lots of humor. It wasn’t until I was reading The House of the Spirits by Isabel Allende (in 12th grade) that I learned about magic realism and Salman Rushdie’s contribution to the genre. Haroun and the Sea of Stories is one of my favorite books I read for (grade) school. And, before you ask, no I haven’t read The Once and Future King in its entirety, yet. 

3. His Dark Materials by Philip Pullman

I’m going to say something controversial: Harry Potter is not my favorite (fantasy) series of my childhood. Don’t get me wrong! I love that series and what it’s done for the speculative fiction genre, children’s and YA literature, the popularity of fantasy, and the reading and the writing communities. Yet, there was another series that came out at the same time and introduced me to the blending of fantasy, science and religion. I read The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman after reading Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling, and I found myself enjoying Lyra’s story more than Harry’s. I want to say it’s because the flawed characters were more believable, the aspects of science and philosophy in a fantasy worked with the plot, and the idea of “other worlds” was intriguing to me. I hadn’t read C.S. Lewis’ or Madeline L’Engle’s series yet, so Philip Pullman was my introduction to portal fantasy, and I’ve been obsessed with them since reading His Dark Materials trilogy. I’ve read The Book of Dust already, and I’m looking forward to reading the rest of the companion trilogy to His Dark Materials; and, I’m excited for Season 2 of the television series, too! 

4. The Modern Faerie Tale Trilogy by Holly Black

I still remember reading Holly Black’s debut novel, Tithe. The story is an urban fantasy about how a teenaged girl realizes she’s been interacting with faeries since she was a child, and what that means for her and her family and her friends. Yes, I read one of Laurell K. Hamilton’s books—her debut novel, Nightseer—so I had a fair idea of what to expect from fae fantasy, but urban fantasy blends the original variants of fae stories with mundane society; and, the fae are NOT nice beings. Fae are not what they are according to Disney movies. They don’t “play fair” and are usually in it for themselves. It makes for an interesting story combining folklore and modernity. I would meet Holly Black at the BookExpo I attended that year, which was my first one; and, I met Cassandra Clare there, too! I read and enjoyed the rest of the trilogy, and Holly Black’s other books, especially The Air of the Folk trilogy. This series was my gateway to reading other books in that genre, especially ones by Seanan McGuire, Ilona Andrews and Amelia Hutchins. 

5. The Twelve Kingdoms by Fuyumi Ono

Yes, there is a fantasy series by the same name by Jeffe Kennedy, but the name of the series is where the similarities end. The 90s saw an expansion of anime series: Pokémon, Gundam Wing, Sailor Moon, etc. Manga and books were being translated and imported to the U.S. The Twelve Kingdoms: Sea of Shadow was translated and released after I graduated from college, and I was introduced to Asian inspired dark fantasy. The story follows Yoko Nakajima, a high schooler who lives a mundane, yet lonely life. To make matters worse, she stands out due to her red hair—she is the biological daughter of Japanese parents. One day, Yoko is abducted at her school, transported to another world, abandoned and left to fend for herself in a new world. This series introduced me to a fantasy world in which the “traveler” is not welcomed as a “hero” and survival is based on realistic situations. The theme of xenophobia in fantasy is presented in a way that will make you think about what could happen in other fantasy worlds, especially when—SPOILER ALERT—the protagonist chooses to remain in that world instead of returning home, and how and why such a choice is made. So, if there are any fans of Seanan McGuire’s Wayward Children series, then you’ll love this series, too. 

6. Monstress by Marjorie Liu, illustrated by Sana Takeda

Growing up, I read comics, graphic novels and manga, and many of them were recommended by friends and relatives. In fact, that’s how I learned about Neil Gaiman’s Sandman series. However, for several years, I didn’t read as many graphic novels as I wanted. I didn’t lose interest, but at the same time, I didn’t know what to read. I did take a course about graphic novels in college, but I took another one when I was in grad school—where I read Watchmen—and learned about the format and its growing influence, especially for the memoir and biography genre. At the same time, two of my friends and classmates introduced me to recent bestsellers and new releases. Not only did I begin to read Joe Hill’s Locke & Key series and Saga by Brian K. Vaughn, but a new series with an eye-catching cover intrigued me: a woman standing in front of a brass door with a matching mechanical arm. Monstress by Marjorie Liu and illustrated by Sana Takeda is a dark fantasy in which a young woman searches into her mother’s research and her lost memories as she deals with demons both real and inner. The artwork will engross you into the world both the author and the artist present. While describing the series as a “visual fantasy” isn’t 100% accurate, it is a way to get speculative fiction fans into reading this graphic novel series. 

7. The Broken Earth Trilogy by N.K. Jemisin

What can I say about this trilogy that hasn’t been said by everyone else who has read it, including myself? This Hugo Award winning series—yes, it swept the Hugos for Best Novel in consecutive years—is a gateway into the future of the speculative fiction genre and the type of stories that can be told withing the genre. N.K. Jemisin not only writes a brilliant science fantasy series, but also incorporates the atrocious practices humanity continues to perform, which forces readers to consider the realities of human society and its future. For me, this series introduced me to modern speculative fiction and the new set of expectations that it brought to the entire community! Jemisin’s contemporaries: Nnedi Okorafor, Tade Thompson, Jesmyn Ward, Tochi Onyebuchi, P. Djèlí Clark, Marlon James, Rivers Solomon, etc.—all have taken familiar tropes of the genre and presented readers with new methods of telling and writing these stories. If you haven’t done so already, then go and read this amazing trilogy!

8. Winternight Trilogy by Katherine Arden

This is not the first folklore retelling I’ve read, but it’s one of the most beautiful written ones I’ve come across; and, it brings a new appreciation for the season of winter. This series follows Vasya as she grows from child to adolescent to adult in a patriarchal society during a transition where “old traditions” are fading and being replaced with a “new” religion. Vasya fights to maintain the old traditions while Russian society undergoes several changes. Folklore is the cultural and the societal traditions that are passed along from generation to generation through a web of communication; and, history plays a role in folklore as well. Katherine Arden presents a balance amongst folklore, history and fantasy in this trilogy. This series will remind speculative fiction fans of the beauty within the genre and how it can remain from beginning to end. 

9. Vita Nostra by Marina and Sergey Dyachenko

While this is the first book in The Metamorphosis series—it’s the only one translated into English so far—it’s a great and mind-blowing introduction into the metaphysical genre. Not to mention, it takes the trope of the “magic school” and provides a more realistic, yet twisted story of what could occur at such a place. This story will make you think of Alan Moore and your concept of reality. In addition, you’ll start to think of these “magic schools” as drafts instead of opportunities. Other genres in speculative fiction has readers asking questions about the world around them, but metaphysical fiction has readers question the reality of their existence. The difference is it seems that a limited population experiences the metaphysical compared to fantasy, science fiction, paranormal, magic realism, etc. This series and genre will make you question everything!

10. The Gutter Prayer by Gareth Hanrahan

Although I’ve heard enough about Joe Abercrombie, Peter McLean, John Gwynne, and Anna Smith Spark enough to buy their books, it was Gareth Hanrahan’s debut novel, The Gutter Prayer, which introduced me to the grimdark subgenre. Yes, I’m a reader and a fan of A Song of Ice and Fire series by George R.R. Martin, but to me that series is more of a historical low-fantasy series rather than straight grimdark (I could be wrong about that). This book introduced me to characters who are all “gray” with “reasonable” motivations who strive towards those goals as their lives and the world fall to pieces. As grim, dark and sad as the characters and their stories are, it continues with the knowledge that life goes one no matter how many people die and are resurrected and die again. This book and its contemporaries represent the harsh side of a fantasy world that reflect ours. 

So, there is my list of speculative fiction books that kept my interest in the genre since childhood. While my list of all-time favorite speculative fiction books continue to change over and over, this list of books influenced my love and my appreciation of this genre of literature. And, from my perspective, I appreciate the influence and the bridging from one book or series to another with a similar genre structure. Which books got you into this genre? Have you read any or all of my picks or any books by the authors mentioned in this post? Comment below or send me a link to your online response. 

Adult Fantasy: Is There Such a Thing?

Video games, graphic novels and comic books and manga, and fantasy literature continue to share the same criticism from those who are neither fans nor creators: they are for children and/or they have no place in a classroom or in an academic setting. The fact that such notions continue to be made is a disconcerting atrocity; and yet, hip-hop continues to gain recognition and acclaim for its role in the music industry and in the rest of society. Pop culture is what it is, popular culture, but there is a difference between an ephemeral fad and a transcendent impact. All of these genres of various entertainment have succeeded in being true art forms, although there are some who continue to ignore the value of these works and what they mean to the fandom and the creators.  

            In the weekend edition of The Wall Street Journal for July 18-19, 2020, there was a review in the Books section of The Nine Realms tetralogy by Sarah Kozloff. I read and reviewed all of the books in the series—both on my blog and for Fantasy-Faction—and, they are worth reading. However, the author of the review had more things to say other than praise for the book series. 

            During that same weekend, I learned of the review due to all of the retweets about what the author said about the series in relation to his personal feelings about the fantasy genre. I noticed that several authors, bookbloggers, and readers were angry by what was written in the review. Even one of the authors stated they were going to cancel their upcoming interview they had with The Wall Street Journal. Then, I saw who wrote the article. It took some time, but I found myself as annoyed as everyone else eventually. And, I’m still annoyed.

            Tom Shippey, the world-renowned Tolkien scholar, should be ashamed of himself. Writers, creators and fans of fantasy and other genres in speculative fiction have minimal expectations of The Wall Street Journal publishing anything with an open mind else besides economics. Yet, Tom Shippey presented a negative nostalgia of the fantasy genre, also known as stagnation. After everything Shippey has said about Tolkien taking fantasy to new heights—even though that wasn’t Tolkien’s intent—while writing the sort of tales he wanted to read himself, Shippey’s statement about The Nine Realms is an insult to Tolkien’s legacy—including all of the authors that were influenced by Tolkien—but an insult to Sarah Kozloff in which Shippey seemed to use in order to publicize his viewpoints about the genre. As a fan of The Nine Realms, the author deserves more praise than from someone who has been searching for Tolkien. Not only stating that “fantasy has grown up,” but also calling Tor a “sci-fi publisher” tells me that the quest for “adult fantasy” has managed to overlook Robert Jordan, Robin Hobb and Brandon Sanderson amongst numerous other authors as contributors to the genre. 

            The problem with Tom Shippey’s statements regarding fantasy is that after spending years discussing Tolkien, he neglects to recognize all of the fantasy works that came after Tolkien. Not to mention, Shippey made it sound like the genre has not made ANY progress since the publication of The Silmarillion in 1977. His beliefs on the genre demonstrate how other people—those in the out-group—continue to view fantasy as “kid’s stuff,” but to have a Tolkien scholar categorize which fantasy work is “adult fantasy” because that story reflects Tolkien’s “fantasy,” which Shippey spent his entire career hanging on to instead of admitting that the genre has continued to expand, to evolve, and to go beyond everyone else’s expectations. To say that Shippey is “missing out” on what “adult” fantasy has become would be a huge understatement. 

            Although fantasy continues to evolve and to be read by fans ubiquitously, the genre continues to receive harsh criticism, especially when compared to both horror and science fiction. Fantasy has gained more recognition because of the success of movies, television and video games, but to have the genre get identified based on age group adds another layer of prejudice to a genre whose progress remains unrecognized. People are willing to watch it and/or to play it, but reading fantasy remains to be an issue that needs to be addressed constantly. So, this all goes back to literature and answering the age-old question: Who reads this?

            Fantasy, or “myths for adults,” has been around since the beginning of humanity, going back to oral tradition. Even now, myths, legends and other folklore continue to entertain us through all styles and formats. Fairy tales are told and watched, movies allow actors and actresses to become those characters, graphic novels and manga and comics present non-stop illustrations, and video games give players an immersive experience. How is wanting to explore another world different from space travel and/or escaping from a haunted domain? Is it because space travel have become a reality? Is it because we all know what it feels like to experience fear no matter where an individual is? Maybe the issue with fantasy is that it remains open to interpretation. Maybe your personal fantasy world doesn’t match mine. Maybe, you wish to attend Camp Half-Blood over the Convent of Sweet Mercy. Or, you wish to go further and create your own fantasy world and share it with others who share your imagination and curiosity, like Tolkien did then, and what N.K. Jemisin, Neil Gaiman and M.L. Wang continue to do now. 

            As for the concept of “adult,” “children’s,” and “YA” fantasy, we should refer to J.R.R. Tolkien and some of his critical essays. Tolkien was a professor of Anglo-Saxon literature at Oxford University—alongside C.S. Lewis—whose edition of Beowulf and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight are still considered to be some of the “preferred” translations by (some) scholars. Maybe if Shippey recalled Tolkien’s professional works as much as his creative works, then maybe he would have remembered one essay of his in particular. 

            J.R.R. Tolkien wrote On Fairy Stories, and in the essay, he states, “the association of children and fairy-stories is an accident of our domestic history,” and “only some children, and some adults, have any special taste for them…it is a taste, too…one that does not decrease but increases with age, if it is innate.” In other words, if children do not show any interest in fairy tales, then they are not interested in them at all. If an individual is interested in those stories as a child, then do not assume that they will outgrow that interest as an adult. Hence, this is why Doctor Who and James Bond have been around for over 50 years! And before you quote that infamous line from 1 Corinthians 13, remember Tolkien was a devout Catholic who created his own fantasy world and inspired millions! Yet, similar to comics, superheroes, animation and fairy tales, fantasy continues to be criticized as being “too silly for adults” and labelled for children. 

            Yes, Disney altered our perspectives of how fairy tales are told, but the studio continues to water (most of) them down. Only the young readers with enough curiosity and imagination will search for the older (and the more violent and the more tragic) variants collected by the Grimm Brothers, those written by Hans Christian Andersen, and others. Nowadays, those children can read Harry Potter and Alanna of Trebond alongside the books written by Rick Riordan and Holly Black as adolescents. Afterwards, as adults, they can read the stories written by Naomi Novik, Katherine Arden and Neil Gaiman. Then, they can (and will) read all of the “adult fantasy” that is not based on folklore directly. As for the maturity content found within (most) adult fantasy, let me put it this way: Shakespeare is required reading in many secondary schools, and many of the plays that are read and/or performed tend to be from the “tragedies” catalog, not the “histories” or the “comedies.” And yes, I just brought up Shakespeare in an essay about Tolkien! Deal with it!

            Tom Shippey is one of the most informed Tolkien scholars, but his knowledge and his interests are limited to Tolkien. The Wall Street Journal tries and fails, constantly, to present insight into other topics besides economics. The newspaper has more than enough resources to gather authors and scholars of the fantasy genre, but wish to limit themselves by delivering something that reflects American society from the 1960s. Jack Zipes and Elizabeth Tucker are prime examples of scholars of folklore and children’s stories. If you want to discuss how much video games have evolved, then read what Frans Mäyrä, Nick Yee, Mia Consalvo, and other game studies scholars have to say and what they have researched. As for scholars of fantasy literature, you can start with Edward James, Farah Mendlesohn and Nnedi Okorafor.

            Ironically, this essay was written and posted during Worldcon 2020, which presents the Hugo Awards to authors in recognition of their achievements in science fiction or fantasy works for (mostly) adult readers and are chosen by its (adult) members. As I await the announcement of the winners, I’ll be reading N.K. Jemisin, Seanan McGuire, S.A. Chakraborty, John Gwynne and other authors of “adult fantasy.” If either Tom Shippey or The Wall Street Journal are interested, then I can offer a galaxy of books for you to choose from; and, you will find them all to be magical and extraordinary. 

            The peculiar quality of the “joy” in successful Fantasy can thus be explained as a sudden glimpse of the underlying reality or truth. It is not only a “consolation” for the sorrow of this world, but a satisfaction, and an answer to that question, “Is it true?” The answer to this question that I gave at first was (quite rightly), “If you have built your little world well, yes: it is true in that world.”

—J.R.R. Tolkien, On Fairy Stories, Epilogue

Speculative Fiction: A Label for the Growing Spectrum of the Genres: Fantasy, Science Fiction & Horror

*My 100th Blog Post!*

For the past year in which I have devoted more time to working on my blog, I have gained a larger audience—followers, readers and other supporters—than I thought possible. Remember, even the most successful bloggers and vloggers start out as “small channels” and are thankful for those who support them. I feel the same way. Knowing that you all have taken the time to read, to comment, to subscribe/follow, and to share my content is a great feeling. I’m extremely grateful for all of you, and it’s because of you all I know what I’m doing is being appreciated by the macrocosm. 

            One of several topics I’ve been discussing with other fans, readers, bloggers and vloggers is the concept of genre and the limitations its definition bestows upon it. The notion that genres can and should be placed within “fixed” classifications is similar to the concept that gender is binary—which, it isn’t! Over the last 100 years, the genres have become more ubiquitous and more successful due to books written by L. Frank Baum, J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, T.H. White, J.K. Rowling, Frank Herbert, Arthur C. Clarke, Octavia Butler, Samuel R. Delany, Ursula K. LeGuin, Shirley Jackson, Isabel Allende, Haruki Murakami, Alan Moore, Stephen King, Anne Rice, etc. And, due to movies such as: The Invasion of the Body Snatchers, E.T., the Extraterrestrial, Star Wars, Star Trek, Pan’s Labyrinth, Akira, etc. Toward the end of the 20th century, other formats of literature and visual entertainment such as comics, graphic novels, manga, video games and music were becoming more popular and expansive. Imports from around the world—i.e. Japan, India, Spain, etc.—have presented popular works of these genres to fans as well. 

            Before the 2000s—I want to say around the 1970s—an emergence of works were presented and released to the public. Besides the Harry Potter Phenomenon and The Lord of the Rings movies, there was Buffy, the Vampire Slayer, The Matrix, and the continued book releases by Stephen King, Anne Rice and Robert Jordan. In addition, video games were growing in popularity and in addition to Mario, Sonic and Zelda there were Final Fantasy, Resident Evil and Shin Megami Tensei. Even those who weren’t reading the books, watching the TV shows or movies, or playing the video games were exposed to fantasy, science fiction and horror. Yet, why did some people prefer Harry Potter over The Lord of the Rings? What was it about Laurell K. Hamilton’s books that had some readers prefer her books over Anne Rice’s? What is it about Shin Megami Tensei, which has several spinoffs—including Persona—that has more of a cult fan base that players find appealing? 

            What I’m getting at is: how would you describe a book like The Northern Lights/The Golden Compass, the Dragon Quest video game series (besides Japanese role-playing games, or JRPGs), or even the Batman comics? Yes, one is a Young Adult novel, one is a JRPG, and the last is a superhero comic book series; but, aren’t there other genres to classify these works besides their marketing ones? Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials Trilogy is a blend of fantasy, science (fiction), religion and philosophy—what did you expect from an Oxford professor? Dragon Quest is a JRPG with elements from the fantasy and adventure genres. Batman—one of the oldest and greatest superhero series of all-time—is a gritty and dark story about a traumatized man who uses his wealth and his wits to go up against the most dangerous criminals in his city. Nowadays, we would consider Batman to be a psychological thriller superhero series with elements of grimdark. Then again, with the recent success of the TV shows Game of Thrones and The Walking Dead, there were many non-readers and fans who said things like, “I don’t like fantasy, but I love Game of Thrones,” or “I don’t like zombies, but The Walking Dead is a great show,” etc. Yes, those shows were media adaptations, which are examples of fantasy and dystopia books that “divert” from “traditional” or “familiar” tropes. However, there are fans of those tropes who are not interested in neither the TV show nor the books. So, why are those the exceptions? They are NOT!

            Speculative fiction is a term that is being used more and more in order to describe literature and media that fall under the “traditional” genres of science fiction, fantasy, horror and comics. According to Marek Oziewicz, speculative fiction, “includes fantasy, science fiction, and horror, but also their derivatives, hybrids, and cognate genres like the gothic, dystopia, weird fiction, post-apocalyptic fiction, ghost stories, superhero tales, alternate history, steampunk, slipstream, magic realism, fractured fairy tales and more,” (3). In other words, speculative fiction includes: urban fantasy, mythological fantasy, zombies, paranormal, space operas, metaphysical, silkpunk, occult, military, historical, romance, etc., etc. Any and all of the genres and subgenres makeup this term.

            So why do some people—authors, writers, readers, critics, academics, fans—use this term? It’s because there are times when a medium either has more than two genres associated within it or displays aspects of speculative fiction that doesn’t fall under any of the “fixed” genres. For example, the Super Mario Bros. franchise is a video game series classified under both “action/adventure” and “platformer,” but could it be categorized in the fantasy genre due to the levels being in an imaginary world, or could it fall under horror or paranormal due to the ghosts and the skeletons, or even science fiction, especially in the context of the Super Mario Galaxy games? In this case, the term speculative fiction would fit best for this gaming franchise. I should mention that I’m not the one who should be recategorizing video games. Then again, this is proof that the term speculative fiction is becoming both recognizable and interchangeable. 

            Speculative fiction seems to become the more acceptable them to use when explaining works and forms of non-mimetic fiction without listing all of the many subgenres associated with it. Recent examples include The Broken Earth Trilogy by N.K. Jemisin and Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia. The first has been categorized under fantasy, science fiction, dystopian literature and magic realism (the last one was on Amazon); and, the second has been categorized under fantasy, mythology, magic realism and historical fiction. Which is easier: listing all of those genres and subgenres in a description, or saying speculative fiction containing elements of certain genres and subgenres such as: a story about the end of the world and Mayan Gods during the Jazz Age? While speculative fiction is an umbrella term, many of us have been using it as a shortcut to explain a collection of books, films and video games. 

            Another factor surrounding speculative fiction concerns education and academia. How many of you remember reading Edgar Allan Poe and/or Turn of the Screw by Henry James in school and in college? How many of you remember reading The House of the Spirits, One Hundred Years of Solitude, or Haroun and the Sea of Stories in school or in college? And, how many of you remember reading one of the many dystopian books: Lord of the Flies, A Handmaiden’s Tale, 1984, Fahrenheit 451, The Giver, Brave New World, etc., in school and in college? Now, how many fantasy, fairy tales, and myths and legends were assigned to you after primary/elementary school? Keep in mind, there are courses and electives about these genres in college, but not everyone gets to take those classes (I was lucky enough to do so). Without going into too much detail, I’ve had disputes about fantasy literature with a few academic professors. Some of them believe that fantasy has no place in higher education except for in Children’s and Adolescent Literature (i.e. teaching, library science). However, scholars are responsible for some of the most recognized works in fantasy. Lewis Carroll, J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis and Philip Pullman were Oxford professors. In addition, there are academic scholars who study and write books and articles about fantasy, science fiction and horror such as: Edward James, Farah Mendlesohn, John Grant, Nnedi Okorafor, John Clute, Jack Zipes and Tzvetan Todorov. This history and the study of these genres are just as essential as reading the fiction. I hate to say it, but speculative fiction seems to be the “safer” and the “more acceptable” term to use when it comes to discussing these genres. 

            So, why do I use the term speculative fiction? My simplest answer is because it signifies all of the genres I enjoy to read, to watch, to write and to game the most. Saying speculative fiction instead of the longlist of genres and subgenres is the easiest and the quickest way to describe certain works of media. If a book can be categorized in more than one genre or subgenre, then why not save the breakdown for a discussion with others in a fandom, or with authors and publishers? Most important, using the term speculative fiction does not limit the story of any medium to one genre. It allows a fan of a metaphysical book to say that “there’s elements of fantasy in this story,” or “the religion in this book is based on the myths and the history of this ancient civilization.” Speculative fiction is a term that allows an audience to observe the broader spectrum of a medium with similar beginnings and interconnecting styles of storytelling. However, there will continue to be moments where a book is categorized as “hard sci-fi,” a video game is of the “horror” genre, and Disney continues to fracture fairy tales. This is the new Golden Age of Speculative Fiction so we might as well enjoy everything that is presented to us while opening the doors for an open interpretation. 

            Thank you for reading my post(s), following my blog and my social media pages! Here’s to many more posts in the future and to several open discussions! Please like and comment here or on my other posts; and, be sure to check out the following references about our favorite genre(s). 

                                                                        References

James, Edward and Farah Mendlesohn, editors. The Cambridge Companion to Fantasy. Cambridge University Press, 2012.  

James, Edward and Farah Mendlesohn, editors. The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction. Cambridge University Press, 2003. 

Martin, Philip. A Guide to Fantasy Literature: Thoughts on Stories of Wonder & Enchantment. Crickhollow Books, 2009.

Oziewicz, Marek. “Speculative Fiction.” Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Literature, March 2017, p.1-22. doi: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190201098.013.78

Stableford, Brian. The A to Z of Fantasy Literature. The Scarecrow Press, Inc., 2009.  

Why You Need to Read…My Selections for Best Speculative Fiction Books of 2019…So Far

We are halfway through 2019 and this year’s speculative fiction books have been both enjoyable and bountiful. Most of the books I’ve read so far this year have been amazing, and I still have A LOT of books in my TBR pile to go through. Like you, I’m an ardent reader and I’ll read just about anything I can get my hands on and has an interesting story. I’ve enjoyed novels, novellas, short stories across various genres of literature. If you’re interested in knowing some of the 51 books I’ve read between January 1stand June 30th2019, then please check out my Goodreads page here: https://www.goodreads.com/Misty306

            I’ve been trying to keep up with both ARCs, and the long list of nominations for this year’s Literary Awards as part of my Reading Award Challenge 2019. I knew it would be harder than it sounded, but I’ve read (and still reading) a lot of amazing books that I wouldn’t have done so otherwise. I suggest that you read a few of the numerous nominations for any of the 2019 SFF Awards. 

That being said, I wanted to point out some of speculative fiction books that were released in 2019 that I’ve enjoyed the most, so far. These are books I recommend you read, especially if you’re a fan of this genre of literature like I am. And, just so you know, these are books that I’ve read and finished between the 1sthalf of 2019. 

These are my Top Ten Picks in no particular order:

The Winter of the Witch (Winternight Trilogy #3) by Katherine Arden

The Wolf in the Whale by Jordanna Max Brodsky

In An Absent Dream (Wayward Children #4) by Seanan McGuire

Uncanny Collateral (Valkyrie Collections #1) by Brian McClellan

Seven Blades in Black (The Grave of Empires #1) by Sam Sykes

A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World by C.A. Fletcher

Aurora Rising (The Aurora Cycle #1) by Amie Kaufman & Jay Kristoff

An Illusion of Thieves (Chimera #1) by Cate Glass

Her Silhouette, Drawn in Water by Vylar Kaftan

Sisters of the Fire (Blood and Gold #2) by Kim Wilkins

Right now, I’m currently reading (released in 2019):

Broken Veil (Harbinger #5) by Jeff Wheeler

Velocity Weapon (The Protectorate #1) by Megan E. O’Keefe

One Word Kill (Impossible Times #1) by Mark Lawrence

Holy Sister (Book of the Ancestor #3) by Mark Lawrence

The Dragon Republic (The Poppy War #2) by R.F. Kuang

            Here are some of the MANY books I hope to read by the end of 2019 (many of these I received at Book Expo 2019!):  

            Those of my picks for the Best Speculative Fiction Books of 2019. I’m still aiming to read at least 100 books by the end of this year; and, I want to write as many reviews here, on Goodreads, on NetGalley and Edelweiss, and on Amazon and Barnes & Noble. If you have any suggestions on what I should read, then please mention them in the Comments Section below. Please keep in mind that I might not be able to get access to certain books for various reasons (i.e. no $$$, waitlist at the library, etc.). Yet, I want to read as much as I can before 2019 ends (it’ll make my Award Reading Challenge 2020 much easier). 

            Which speculative fiction books released in 2019 have been your favorite so far?

TV Episode Review: “Deadly Class: Sink with California”

Note: There are some minor spoilers in this review. You have been warned. 

This season finale is separated into two parts. One, being Marcus and his crew invading Chester’s stronghold in order to stop him and his crew, and to retrieve Chico’s body. And two, Master Lin running from the Cartel with his daughter in tow. Marcus’ storyline follows the graphic novels, while Master Lin’s storyline allows viewers and fans to learn more about the Headmaster’s convictions. 

Marcus and his friends—minus Willie—attack the house but learn quickly that Chester and his crew are formidable forces. The fight scenes and the dialogue are straight from the graphic novel. However, Chester’s monologue with his camcorder allows Marcus and viewers to learn more about him…before he dies. Chester reiterates how society is to blame for his actions and his lifestyle (the same B.S.); yet, Marcus tells him that’s no reason to take his frustrations on other people. Ironically, when Chester is killed by one of his “friendly” dogs, it is safe to say that Chester’s notions got him chewed up by his same philosophy. 

The fighting isn’t just between Marcus and Chester, Maria and Saya have some words and strikes against each other about their actions and feeling towards Marcus. Maria still hasn’t realized how much her friends are risking because of her actions. Saya—while admitting to sleeping with Marcus—feels she doesn’t have to explain herself to someone as selfish as Maria. While this sounds like typical adolescent girls fighting over a boy, it is important to know Saya and Maria were brought to King’s Dominion for a reason. Saya tells Maria that she still hasn’t figured out what she’s supposed to do and decides to leave Maria to figure it out by herself. But first, she and Marcus will have to escape the Cartel.

Meanwhile, Master Lin continues to feel the wrath of the Cartel. Now, this doesn’t happen in the graphic novels, but it is interesting to see how and why King’s Dominion is run the way it is, and to learn more about any potential relatives Master Lin may or may not have. This storyline is obvious, Master Lin and his daughter run to avoid gunshots, Master Lin manages to fight off those on foot, and father and daughter make it back to the school, where his sister, Master Gao, notices the errors of her brother’s actions. Master Gao does what her brother should have done, send his daughter to the “Temple” for her training. Now, this choice is a reminder to what happened to both Maria and Saya when they were the same age as Master Lin’s daughter. However, Master Lin should have taken more precautions in protecting his daughter by training her himself. What happens to Master Lin and Master Gao at King’s Dominion will remain a mystery until Season 2—if there is one.

For viewers who enjoyed Sink with Californiaand are curious to the ending—where Chico’s father meets Maria and Marcus at Chester’s stronghold—then I should let you know that that does occur in the graphic novel. However, I won’t tell you what happens next. You’ll either have to read the series, or wait for the next season. As for Willie, I have no idea what’s going to happen to him.

This season final offers the end of the plot of Marcus attending and adjusting at King’s Dominion School of the Deadly Arts. Marcus made friends with several of his classmates, and they’ve entertained themselves by traveling to places any adolescent would go to if given the chance and killing people while they were at it. Marcus managed to end his feud with Chester and can go back to being a student and not a fearful homeless kid. Unfortunately, life doesn’t work out the way we want them to, and Marcus should know that better than anyone else. And, with the two cliffhangers, all we can do is wait and see how Marcus will survive these next obstacles.

Note:A review of Season One will be available soon. 

TV Episode Review: “Deadly Class: Kids of the Black Hole”

Note: There are some minor spoilers in this review. You have been warned. 

            It’s the buildup to the final showdown and the kids decide to have fun before the big fight, which is during Christmas Break. Chester has gathered his posse at the house he has taken over and continues his torture, with Chico’s head still in the ice. Saya is able to track down Chester to his hideout, which he’s turned into a fortress. Chester is expecting a retaliation from Marcus and his friends for his actions. Marcus has been making plans in order to get revenge and to prove his conviction. 

            When Willie decides not to take any part of the upcoming showdown between Marcus and his former roommate, it’s a reminder to the audience that the characters do have a choice to their actions. Maria and Marcus made decisions because they believed they didn’t have a choice. Saya chooses her friends over the assignment Master Lin gives her. Willie does have a choice and his decision to leave is vital; at the same time, we know that Willie isn’t one to abandon his friends completely. 

            Meanwhile, Master Lin’s efforts to protect his family has reached its end. Yes, he didn’t want his daughter to have the same upbringing and lifestyle as his sister and Saya, but he underestimated the need for his family to be able to defend themselves. It is not clear who tipped off Chico’s father and the rest of the Cartel, but the cliché narrative about the consequences of secrets and making the decision that should have been made in the first place will play out in the season finale. 

            Kids of the Black Holegives viewers the title of the episode. The lifestyle of assassins sucks people into a vortex. And, when presented with the opportunity to avoid that vortex, the decision to either go in, or stay out can be a matter of life and death. And, like with every decision every character has made throughout this season, there will be consequences for all of those involved. 

TV Episode Review: “Deadly Class: The Clampdown”

 Note: There are some minor spoilers in this review. You have been warned. 

            While Kings Dominion investigates the death of another student, the students are placed under lockdown. The lockdown is effective to the point where several of the students are shoved into random dorm rooms instead of their own. This is interesting because viewers see more interaction between the students who are not friendly with one another. At the same time, the cliques from the Pilotepisode is brought back in order to reiterate the reasons why these kids became students at Kings Dominion in the first place. And yes, while some of the students believe Marcus is the center of the conflicts at the school, the teachers and the administration know that Marcus is being labeled as a scapegoat. This is how rumors spread. 

            Marcus gets interrogated by Master Lin and Maria gets interrogated by Master Gao. And, while it is obvious that Master Lin and Master Gao want the same thing—to diffuse a potential race/gang war within the school—their methods demonstrate how these siblings remain at odds with each other. Master Lin believes what he wants to believe, while Master Gao knows the truth, but cannot prove it. Master Lin is able to stop the adults from interfering with the school, but Master Gao believes in “an eye for an eye” philosophy. It makes you wonder what could happen when these siblings work together instead trying to outmaneuver each other.  

Confessions is the theme for The Clampdown. Maria confesses to killing both Chico and Yukio; Marcus confesses to knowing about it; and, Saya confesses that she sees Maria as a friend even with all of the tension breaking out between the Cartel and the Yakuza. And, while it seems that the conflict between the two gangs is over for now, Marcus’ confession to his friends about his past reminds everyone what is really at stake, the existence of Kings Dominion to the outside world. 

In all, The Clampdown presents which of the students are willing to do help themselves versus which students are willing to help each other. It becomes obvious that Marcus trusts his friends more than his roommate and that Maria and Saya trust each other more than their fellow members. Silly as it may sound, this friendship is what will bring about a very entertaining season finale. 

TV Episode Review: “Deadly Class: Rise Above”

Note: There are some minor spoilers in this review. You have been warned. 

            This episode is about revelations. Viewers learn about what happened to both Marcus and “F**kface” at the shelter, Maria’s “ranking” within the Cartel and how her troubles are not over, and Master Lin’s (family) secret. While the conflicts involve the outside world, everything still revolves around Kings Dominion. Marcus, Saya and Billy hunt for “F**kface” with one of their teachers; Maria continues to play her role within the Cartel by pretending to grieve for Chico and following his father’s quest for vengeance; and, how and why Master Lin kept his family hidden away from his sister. 

            Readers and viewers are treated to another motion comic about Marcus and “F**kface’s” relationship and why Marcus made his decisions when he escaped. However, things did not go as planned and Marcus is still dealing with the consequences, which have carried over into his school. The motion comic serves two purposes. One is to limit the live action violence. And two, to provide content from the graphic novel, directly. Readers get the “straight from the pages” content and viewers get more of the artistic style and the narrative structure of this series.

            The consequences of Chico’s murder are split into twofold. Marcus, worried about what his former roommate will do, puts together an excursion with his friends and his teacher in order to track him down, which they do. However, and for TV purposes, “F**kface” escapes, but knows he’s being hunted. At the same time, Maria continues to lie to save herself. Unfortunately, she is unable to let her schoolmates, who are not members of the Cartel, know what is going on. So, her actions by the end of the episode will single her out due to all the secrecy. Finally, Master Lin is avoiding his familial responsibilities, with good reason. He allows his emotions to cloud his thinking and his sister discovers Master Lin’s life outside of Kings Dominion. 

            Rise Aboveis an interesting buildup to the upcoming season finale. And, while it’s obvious what is going to happen with one of the storylines, it is difficult to imagine how the other two conflicts get resolved by then. Revelations and its consequences were central to this episode, but that doesn’t mean that it stops within this episode. Outside groups are interfering with the structure of Kings Dominion, so it’ll be interesting to see how the school responds to these outsiders. 

TV Episode Review: “Deadly Class: Stigmata Martyr”

Note: There are some minor spoilers in this review. You have been warned. 

            The fun ends and the consequences are mounting up in this follow up episode. A student died—due to “unknown circumstances”—and Kings Dominion is investigating because the family of the student wants to know what happened, which is understandable. However, no one is talking and the school, and the student’s crew, is losing patience. 

            The school administration conducts the investigation into how and why the student was killed off campus and why the body has not been found (a change from the graphic novel). In addition, the investigation observes the conduct of all of the classes and since it’s being done subtlety, some of the instructors find themselves in a position of compromise. One class in particular may or may not get a new instructor. 

            Maria, feeling both guilt and relief, decides she doesn’t need her medication anymore. This is a bad idea for several reasons the most obvious being that her behavior keeps changing and everyone at the school is watching her. A combination of emotions and mental health, including trauma, is not good for Maria. At the same time, Marcus’ former roommate, who survived the fire also, continues his desperation to gaining what he believed Marcus “stole” from him. Now, that someone outside of the school knows about the events in Las Vegas and the school’s existence, Marcus and his friends have to figure out a way to make another problem go away.

            In all, Stigmata Martyrreminds viewers that there are rules, consequences and conduct associated within a school, even ones for assassins. The fighting sequence on the school grounds was one of the episode’s highlights as well as Billy’s temperament in one of his classes. Marcus, Saya, Maria and Billy handle the circumstances in their own way, which makes us realize that they’re slowly becoming desensitized to murder. Yet, the friends will need to be desensitized in order to be ready for what’s about to come. 

TV Episode Review: “Deadly Class: Saudade”

Note: There are some minor spoilers in this review. You have been warned. 

            This episode was taken straight from the graphic novel! Anyone who has read the series knows what to expect from this episode of the television adaptation, and readers will not be disappointed. Yes, there was one minor change from the graphic novel for the episode, but the change and the foreshadowing was well done in this episode. Once again, readers know what to expect before the viewers.

The visuals of this episode are what make it worth watching. The hallucinations Marcus has throughout the episode, the scenery of Las Vegas in the 1980s, and the fight scene at the end illustrate the efforts in the cinematography. I have not seen a drugged scene play out so well on television since BoJack Horseman. Marcus’ “trip” lasts throughout most of the episode, which means viewers get a mural from Marcus rather than a soliloquy.

            The main theme surrounding this episode was victims of abuse. While it’s obvious that Marcus and his friends all have baggage from their pasts, we learn of the affects on other victims of abuse, and why their pent up emotions could have devastating, yet understanding effects. Marcus’ drug trip puts him out of commission for most of the episode, so the focus is more on Billy and Maria. It was Billy’s idea to take a road trip to Las Vegas in order to kill his father. And, Maria is making her plans for disappearing from Chico—and his family—permanently. The literal demons attack Marcus, Billy and Maria leading to some heart-wrenching consequences for them and their classmates.

            Saudadereturns the story back to the graphic novels. Now that the fillers provided more insight into each of the main characters, the school, and Marcus, viewers and fans have a better understanding of what to expect for the rest of the season. And, as of right now, viewers have seen the murders committed by 3 students (on screen), the death of 2 students, and the journey of the single psychopath who is getting closer and closer to our protagonist.