Reading Check-In: July 31, 2021

What book have you finished reading recently?

O!M!G! This book…WOW!

I started reading this eARC at the beginning of the year, but I had to stop because of classes. It turns out that I stopped at the right spot because I was able to dive back into the story when the story, the plot and the characters continued to developed.

It’s not speculative fiction, but it’s still enjoyable so far. I haven’t watched the movie yet, but I did read some of the Sherlock Holmes books as a kid so I had high hopes for this book. This is the 7th book in the series and the only one I’ve read so far; and, it’s an excellent spinoff!

What are you reading currently?

I’ll be reading this book throughout the weekend. I don’t know whether or not I’ll finish it by then, but I expect to make some more progress.

There are 2 plots within this story, but it seems like only one of them will continue onto Book 2!

What will you read next?

There is a reason why I started reading this book, which I can’t get into yet. That being said, I should have tried to read the eARC I received when I had the time.

I should read this book before the next one in the series is released.

I haven’t forgotten about this book!

I want to read this book BEFORE its publication.

I know my list of books keeps getting shuffled, but I read what I want when I’m in the mood and when I have the time.

Reading Check-In: July 17, 2021

A brief update about my readings.

But first, not that this should be a goal of mine, but I decided to reduce this year’s Goodreads (yes, I have a Storygraph account) reading goal from 100 books to 50 books. At the beginning of this year, I knew there I shouldn’t have pushed my limits this year due to other life factors (read my midyear post), but I decided to push my limits. Halfway through 2021, I knew that it would be better if I focused on finishing the books I was reading without worrying about how many I was reading. Honestly, I just want to read the books because I want to not because I’m worried about a number.

What book have you finished recently?

Both the plot development and the world-building were brilliant! And, we have a cover for the final book in this series! Both the cover and the finale are going to be EPIC!!!

What are you reading currently?

I’m about halfway through both of these books. And, I can tell you right now, you need to read both of them!

What will you read next?

I started reading these books when I received them as ARCs, but as you all know, I had to halt my reading to focus on other priorities. These books have been out for some time and I want to finish reading them before the end of the year.

As for recent releases and other ARCs, you’ll know which one(s) I start reading when I do.

Yes, I know that these are all fantasy books! You can read my recent sci-fi reviews in my previous posts!

The Midpoint of 2021: Favorite Speculative Fiction Books…So Far

Well, we’ve made it to the halfway point of 2021. I won’t begin this post with the usual current events, but I will mention that I’ve been enjoying ALL of the sporting events that are taking place (i.e. Euro Cup, Copa America, NBA & NHL Playoffs, Summer 2020/21 Olympic Trials, etc.). More attention has been given to both books and video games as those who’ve been at home continue to remember that they’re both entertaining and artistic.

As for me, I’ve been recovering from an exhausted winter and spring. This is because, as a few of you know, I went back to graduate school in order to earn a MA degree in Library and Information Science. For the last 2 years, I’ve been taking classes on an accelerated pace in order to complete the program sooner rather than later. No, COVID-19 wasn’t an “imminent” threat when I started back in Fall 2019; and yes, it was an interesting experience completing the program throughout the majority of the pandemic, work my part-time job outside of my residence, and continue working on my blog. In addition, I’ve only told my closest friends and acquaintances (including you) about this, meaning I’ve managed to work on a degree without my ENTIRE family knowing about it. And, unless they read this post, then it will stay that way until I am ready to make an announcement, which will be sometime after I get a job within my field (whenever that may be).

Why am I mentioning this now? Simple, it’s because during my last semester, I had to work on graduating on time and in order to do that I had to cutback on SOME of my reading. Those of you who follow me on Goodreads will notice that I’m behind on my Reading Goal and I’m lagging on completing the books I’m reading currently. I won’t get into my TBR piles both from Netgalley and Edelweiss! It’s NOT that the books are bad in anyway, I’m still mentally exhausted from all of the work I had to do in order to graduate on time; not to mention all of the other events called life.

I am starting to feel better and I started to catch up on both my reading and my writing (including reviews). You’ve noticed that I started posting reviews again, but remember I read faster than I write. Which brings me to another announcement: I realized that my 200th post is upcoming and I plan on writing another “special” piece in order to commemorate the milestone. What will it be? You just have to wait.

Now, for what you’ve been waiting for:

Books I’ve Finished Reading:

Across the Green Grass Fields

First, Become Ashes

Tower of Mud and Straw (It was nominated for a Nebula Award for “Best Novella”!)

The Bone Shard Daughter (Yes, it was released in 2020, but the sequel comes out later this year!)

The Light of the Midnight Stars

Chaos Vector (Just in time to read the final book in the trilogy!)

Fugitive Telemetry

Over the Woodward Wall (Along the Saltwise Sea comes out this fall!)

Shards of Earth (My 1st Book Tour!)

And, A LOT of Paranormal & Fantasy Romance Books by Indie Authors (That’s for a future post!)

Books I’m Reading Currently:

The Empire’s Ruin

The House of Always

She Who Became the Sun

The Unbroken

The Jasmine Throne

The Gilded Ones

Books I Want to Read by the End of 2021:

The Broken God

Firebreak

The Fire Keeper’s Daughter

House of Hollow

The Unspoken Name

The Witch’s Heart

For the Wolf

The Two-Faced Queen

The Next 2 Books in The First Argentines Series

The sequels of the upcoming books mentioned; more paranormal & fantasy romance books; and, several MORE books I can’t list here because otherwise, this post would be never-ending.

I don’t know whether or not I will be able to read the books mentioned by the end of this year. I’m still trying to catch up from last year’s TBR! So right now, I want to thank the authors, the other bloggers, Fantasy-Faction, all of the publishers and the agents for being both supportive and understanding as I continue to work my way through the last 6 months, and for encouraging me to continue working on my other writings.

Speaking of “other” writings, please keep an eye out for any upcoming essays and lists I will continue to share here. Any and all feedback are welcome.

We’re halfway through 2021. What are your plans for the rest of the year?

Also, if you haven’t already, then please read the essay I wrote that was published on the SFWA website! Click here to access it.

Why You Need to Read: “Chaos Vector”

The Protectorate: Book 2: Chaos Vector                               

By: Megan E. O’Keefe                                                           Audiobook: 19 hours and 5 minutes

Published: July 28, 2020                                                      Narrated by: Joe Jameson

Genre: Science Fiction/Space Opera

            “It’s been two years. Why would things escalate now?

            Graham smiled slyly. “Because you’re back, kid. Two years and some change was about the time you disappeared, about the time Icarion lost control of Bero. Nakata, Kenwick, Lavaux—they’re all tangled up somehow, and Harlan and his crew crossed paths with that lot,” (Chapter 6: Can’t Count on a Spy). 

            Cliffhangers have always been an interesting concept in storytelling. I’ve mentioned in previous posts that cliffhangers are excellent ways to keep the audience engaged in the narrative. There are several cliffhangers the storyteller can use, but depending on the narrative, one fits better than others. In the case of Megan E. O’Keefe and her The Protectorate trilogy, Chaos Vector—the sequel to Velocity Weapon—picks up immediately after the revelations in the first book. And, that includes both the plot and the pace.

            There are 4 protagonists in this book. First, is Sanda Greeve, who went from “Hero of Ada Prime” to suspected murdered of a Keeper. Now, she’s on the run to clear her name after a brief reunion with her family and to discover what is in the Keeper Chip that is embedded in her skull. After learning some about one of her fathers’ past, Sanda joins up with Arden, Nox and everyone else in Harlan’s crew in order to solve 2 mysteries with 1 person of interest, Rainier Lavaux. Second, is Biran Greeve, Sanda’s younger brother and one of the Keepers. Life as a Keeper begins to catch up with Biran as he does damage control, first for his sister and then for the Keepers; and, he begins his investigation into the missing Keeper, the stolen Keeper Chip, and The Light of Berossus, all while trying to figure out who among the other Keepers are his allies. Third, is Jules, whose circumstances and previous actions now have her working for Rainier Lavaux. She hides herself from her friends as she does everything she can to save one of them, but is she being played? Last, is Tomas Cepko, the agent from Nazca whom Biran hired previously. Now that his mission is complete, Tomas is given a new assignment; and, it’s Rainier Lavaux. All of the protagonists and the other characters are beginning to comprehend the effect their recent actions have on one another, for the rest of Ada Prime, and the Icarions. Not to mention, what happened to Bero? 

            The first plot in this novel carries over from the first book, only now there are more questions than answers. But, everything revolves around Rainier Lavaux, the wife of the murdered Keeper. Somehow, she knows about both The Light of Berossus and the Keeper Chip; but, which one will she go after? And, why is she so interested in Jules? The second plot revolves around the Keeper Chip lounged in Sanda’s skull. Sanda is on a mission to discover the contents on the Chip before Ada Prime’s enemies track her down and reclaim it. Meanwhile, Biran looks into which Keeper went missing and why that Keeper’s Chip stands out more than the other ones. There are 2 subplots, which develop alongside the 2 plots which enhances and expands the narrative. The first one focuses on Jules’ efforts to thwart Rainier Lavaux’s plans, which pulls Jules further into an intergalactic conspiracy that she never would have imagined getting involved in. The second subplot delves into the events of the past which may or may not have impacted the present. As everything converges, it begins to make sense. 

            The narrative is more straightforward than in the first book. There are 2 years that the narrative focuses on: Prime Standard Year 0002 (the past) and Prime Standard Year 3543 (the present). All of the narratives are told in the 3rd person limited in the present tense from the points-of-view of the protagonists. Unlike the previous book, the sequence of events allow the narrative to be followed easily by readers (and by listeners). The streams-of-consciousness of the protagonists not only give the audience a complete understanding of the revelations, but also make the characters reliable narrators.

            The style Megan E. O’Keefe uses in Chaos Vector flows from Velocity Weapon. There is a political conspiracy that is starting to unravel, but the majority of the citizens seem focused on the continued conflict between 2 feuding nations. This conflict reflects the mood of this novel which is distraction. The leaders of Ada Prime do not want their citizens to worry about “threats,” so they make announcements about falsehoods to keep everyone “calm” as they continue to work on a cover-up instead of addressing the conflict. This leads to the tone of this book which centers around the idea of duty. Some of the characters are more willing to follow up on their obligations than others including their superiors. It remains to be seen whether or not the characters’ choices will have negative consequences for the rest of the galaxy.

            The appeal for Chaos Vector have been positive. Fans of Velocity Weapon will be pleased to know that the author presents a strong and fast-paced sequel to this familial space opera. Science fiction fans and anyone who is interested in an intriguing space opera should read this series, especially with the third and final book in the trilogy—Catalyst Gate—releasing this summer (2021)! If you cannot read the book, then you can listen to the audiobook like I did. Once again, Joe Jameson does an excellent job narrating this story, and I hope he does the next book!

            Chaos Vector is a strong and an entertaining sequel to this underappreciated space opera. Both the characters and the plot develop as answers lead to more questions. Everything Megan E. O’Keefe has written in her story guarantees a promising conclusion to this trilogy! Don’t wait any longer, start reading The Protectorate

My Reading: Enjoy It (4.5 out of 5). 

Why You Need to Read: “Fugitive Telemetry”

The Murderbot Diaries, #6: Fugitive Telemetry

By: Martha Wells

Published: April 27, 2021

Genre: Science Fiction

            But whatever, now I just needed intel for threat assessment so I could figure out if GrayCris had killed the dead human or not and go back to my happy boring life on Preservation Fucking Station, (Chapter Three).

            I LOVE MURDERBOT! And, I’m so happy that both Martha Wells and TorDotCom continue to write and to release stories about this snarky, astute and loyal rogue SecUnit. Following up on the success of the Murderbot novel, Network Effect—which, I haven’t read yet—fans get to read, Fugitive Telemetry, the next novella in the series, whose story takes place AFTER the events in Exit Strategy and BEFORE the events in Network Effect

            Murderbot, the rogue Security Unit, is starting its new life on Preservation Station after rescuing Dr. Mensah from GrayCris. However, that is easily said than done. Dr. Mensah is experiencing P.T.S.D., certain members of her team still don’t trust Murderbot—for example, it can’t use its name because it might scare everyone off—and, oh right, there was a murder of human and Station Security is trying to figure out what happened. Murderbot is worried that GrayCris might have something to do with it and decides it’s going to investigate the scene so it can go back to adapting to its new life. Whether or not it wants to admit it, Murderbot wants to continue protecting Dr. Mensah and her team. It would never admit it, but it feels both welcomed and needed by them.

            The plot in this novella focuses on the murder mystery at Preservation Station. Who was the dead human? Who wanted him dead? Is there a connection between the dead human and GrayCris? Regardless, Murderbot is willing to work with Station Security—through its own methods and strategies—to put its humans at ease. The subplot in this novella is Murderbot becoming acclimated with its new life. While it is no longer a SecUnit for hire, Murderbot is not one to relax—although it wants to very much. In order to adapt to its new life, Murderbot has to compromise with Station Security, Dr. Mensah, and its instincts. 

            The narrative is told from Murderbot’s point-of-view in the past tense. The name of the series is more than a hint as to how the narrative is presented, which is in the format of a report that recounts all of the events after they occurred. Given that Murderbot is an A.I., the narrative includes the sequence of events based on its stream-of-consciousness, which makes it a reliable narrator. This brilliant narrative technique presents a straightforward and hilarious narrative that can be followed by readers easily.

            The style Martha Wells continues to use in her Murderbot series reminds us that diaries are private for a reason. Murderbot keeps track of his actions and activities in a way sci-fi fans believe an A.I. would when necessary. And honestly, if all reports were written the way the author has written for her protagonist, then they all would be just as entertaining to read. The mood in this novella reflects a dark comedy—or, a style of comedy that points out a subject matter that is too serious to present straightforward. There is a “dead human” and Murderbot has no intention of using euphemisms because everyone else is “upset” about it. The tone reflects agency, especially Murderbot’s. Say whatever you want about it, but Murderbot knows A LOT about humans, which is why it is so reliable to its allies. 

            So far, the appeal for Fugitive Telemetry have been positive. Several other readers and fans have given this novella 4- and 5-star reviews. This latest novella is an excellent addition to the series and the science fiction canon. And, with Network Effect winning this year’s Nebula Award for Best Novel, fans can relax because they are not the only ones who love this series. In fact, we can expect at least 3 more Murderbot books in the future. Where will those books fall within the series? We’ll have to wait and see.

            Fugitive Telemetry is a humorous murder mystery story that happens to be about a prickly A.I. who refuses to admit that it cares about humans. Fans can rest easy because neither the author nor her protagonist have lost their spark in this latest entry. Newcomers to the series have no idea what they’re in for and they should be prepared to binge read the series, and then wait for the next book with the rest of us. Now, I have to read Network Effect!

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!!! 

Thank you TorDotCom for sending me an eARC of this book!

Why You Need to Read: “Shards of Earth”

The Final Architects Trilogy, #1: Shards of Earth

By: Adrian Tchaikovsky

Published: May 27, 2021 (U.K.)/August 3, 2021 (U.S.)

Genre: Science Fiction

            The Architects had discovered that humans existed. The war, that had raged for eighty years and cost billions of lives, had been fought without the knowledge of one of its parties. And on becoming aware of humanity, the Architects had simply vanished. Nobody knew where they went. Nobody knew where they had come from or why they’d done what they did. They had never been seen again, (Part 1: Roshu, 3: Solace). 

            There is always that one author whose books you try to make time to read because you’ve heard nothing but excellent things about their books. However, for some reason, you buy, and you start reading one of their books, and for some reason, you don’t get to finish it. So, what do you do? Well, in my case, you get asked to participate in a book tour for the author’s upcoming novel, Shards of Earth, the first book in The Final Architects Trilogy. Finally, I could delve into this author’s creative mind. 

            The main characters in this novel are the crew of the ship, Vulture God, scavengers who travel throughout the galaxy and perform jobs for payment. The captain of the Vulture God is Rollo Rostand, but one of the protagonists is the ship’s navigator, Idris Telemmier, who is an Intermediary, a genetically modified individual who was used as a weapon to fight against the Architects 40 years ago. Idris still suffers from PTSD and keeps both his past and his abilities to himself. That is until Myrmidon Executor Solace, a Partheni soldier and agent, tracks Idris down with a “proposition” for him. Idris knows he can’t evade Solace forever, but before he can confront her, the Vulture God accepts a job no one else wants. The good news is the Vulture God completes the job. The bad news is the crew stumbled upon something HUGE, which forces them to become fugitives. Another protagonist is Havear Mundy, an Intervention Board agent, who has been tasked with tracking down the crew of the Vulture God to learn of their “activities.” The rest of the crew—Kris (another protagonist), Olli, Barney and Medvig—develop alongside Idris, Solace and Havaer. While they are all different races and have separate histories, they are terrified of the Architects.  

            The plot of this story focuses on the long-term aftermath of an alien invasion of a different sort. The Architects invaded the galaxy, but instead of simply dominating humans and the other races, they destroyed planets in a way which leaves the survivors shaken. After several decades, the Architects left and the societal galaxy has changed, but there have been signs that the Architects have returned. The question is: should the news go public? Not to mention, who is left that knows how to fight them off? There is one subplot that deserves the most attention and that is the various factions—both political and religious—who are fighting for dominance and have their own views about the Architects and the rumors of their “return.” Between the cults and the stereotypes all of the races have about each other, you are left wondering how they all would survive a 2nd invasion. This subplot develops alongside the plot at an appropriate rate. This is because the world is fleshed out as the story develops.

            The narrative is told from the points-of-view of Idris, Solace, the other crew members of the Vulture God, and Havear in the 3rd person limited. This means the reader knows what is happening to the characters from one of their perspectives. While there are moments where the characters present their memories and their past experiences, the narrative is presented through their streams-of-consciousness in the present; and, their experiences and knowledge of their race and their history make them reliable narrators. Yes, the narrative is heavy at times, but it can be followed by the reader(s). 

            The style Adrian Tchaikovsky uses for Shards of Earth is part hard science fiction and part space opera. Readers can tell this story is a space opera—the mention of spaceships, galaxies, space battles, etc.—from the Prologue. The hard science fiction becomes noticeable when readers learn about the genetics of each race and the ecosystems of each planet. Yes, it is A LOT of information and scientific terminology, but the world-building that comes from it presents a believable galaxy (could it be our future?). Plus, there is a Glossary which readers can consult while they read the book. In addition, the author’s take on the factions as part of the war’s aftermath is believable. Think about it, during the last 20 years of global events—including the COVID-19 Pandemic—how much has religion and politics changed? In fact, it’s creepy how accurate the cult following of the author’s factions reflect the ones in our present day. The mood in this novel is an ominous one because the signs of the threat are there, and the individuals must decide on what they are going to do about it. The tone in this novel focuses on the self-imposed options of all of the characters within the story. Many of the characters in this story come from races and/or planets where certain “orders” are expected to be followed by those in charge. However, when “bigger” things are at stake, shouldn’t there be a choice for everyone regardless of societal expectations? In fact, why is free will such a difficult concept for some of these factions and races? 

            So far, the appeal for Shards of Earth have been positive. I say this because this book have been released in the U.K. with an upcoming release in the U.S. later this summer. As I mentioned earlier, I am participating in a book tour, so I received an eARC of this book. I can tell you that the hype surrounding this book is real, and fans of Adrian Tchaikovsky’s previous books will appreciate this one. And, as a fan of both Megan E. O’Keefe and Martha Wells, I highly recommend this book. Yes, this is the 1st book in a trilogy, and with the way this book ended, you’re going to be anxious to read Book 2 when it comes out. While there were moments where familiar sci-fi tropes appeared, the story was worth the read.

            Shards of Earth is an informative and an exceptional story about alien invasions, feuding factions, and eugenics. I’m glad this book tour gave me the opportunity to read this book in advanced, which allowed me to complete a book by Adrian Tchaikovsky! So, which of his books should I read next as I wait for the next book in this series?   

My Rating: Enjoy It (4 out of 5). 

Reading Check-In: May 1, 2021

I’ve managed to get some reading done this week.

What did you finish reading?

I LOVE MURDERBOT! Another excellent novella about our favorite snarky robot! I’m aiming to reading Network Effect this summer, finally!

What are you currently reading?

I’m still listening to Chaos Vector, and I hope to finish it within the next 1-2 weeks.

I’m back to reading Shards of Earth. The good news is because I haven’t made too much progress, which means I still remember everything that I’ve read so far.

What will you read next?

FYI: The title for Book 5, which is the last book in this series, has been released. It’s available on a certain website!

I am WAY behind on my reading (for reasons I’ll get into when the time is right). These are 3 of several books I hope to start reading by the end of the month.

Reading Check-In: April 24, 2021

Hello everyone! This week’s post is another update on what I’m reading.

What did you finish reading?

I finished this book some about 2 weeks ago, but I haven’t written my review of it yet. For those of you who’ve read Middlegame, you will recognize the title of the series (The Up-and-Under) and the author’s name, A. Deborah Baker (a.k.a. Seanan McGuire’s pseudonym). This story follows two young children from opposite sides of the same community who come across a wall, climb over it, meet each other in a new world, and make their way through it while meeting everyone who resides there. The next book, Along the Saltwise Sea, comes out later this fall. Even if I don’t get a galley of this book, then I plan on preordering it.

What are you currently reading?

I was hoping to finish this book sooner so I would have my review ready BEFORE next week’s release. Tor.com was kind enough to approve my request for this galley, and I thought I had to read Network Effect before reading this novella. After a few of my fellow bookbloggers clued me in that this story takes places before the novel, I started it immediately. I LOVE MURDERBOT, and I’m aiming to finish this story and to have the review written and posted very soon!

Currently, I’m still listening to the audiobook (while re-reading the chapters in my galley), and I’m 75% done with this book. I believe I know what could happen by the end of this book. However, the cover reveal for Book 3 has me wanting to finish this book A.S.A.P.!

What will you read next?

Without getting into too much detail, I received an eARC of this book early. I’ve been meaning to read the books this author has written for a long time. In fact, I’ve read the 1st half of The Tiger and the Wolf, and I haven’t finished it yet (READ IT). I started this book, and so far it’s a space opera experience I won’t forget anytime soon. I’m looking forward to reading this book through. And yes, my review for this book will be SPOILER FREE.

This week’s Book Haul!

Do I have to explain how excited I am for this book?! The Broken God is supposed to take place right after the events at the end of The Shadow Saint. All I know about this book is that Cari returns as one of the main P.O.V. characters. And, the author announced recently that the series has been expanded to 5 books! Yes, I’m excited about that, and I’m curious as to what will happen between the end of this book and the end of the series.

Reading Check-In: March 20th 2021

Yes, I’m “borrowing” this idea from Realms of My Mind

This is not a review post. While I prepare to participate in some upcoming events (watch the livestream I participated for The Bone Shard Daughter here), I will continue to catch up on some of my reading. The reviews will be posted as they are written, but life is taking over more of my time. At the same time, I can’t just NOT post something!

What did you recently finish reading?

This debut novel is a brilliant blend of dark fantasy and horror. This book reminds me of Black Sun by Rebecca Roanhorse. I will explain how and why in my upcoming review.

This book is a beautiful follow up by Rena Rossner. This book comes out in April 2021. My review will be ready and posted by that time.

What are you currently reading?

I need to finish this audiobook.

I know, I know. I’m behind on my reading, but this book is so good!

I’m behind on reading this book, too. Believe it or not, for a YA novel, this book is just as brutal as my other current read.

What do you think you’ll read next?

I started this book last year, but I didn’t get to finish it by the end of 2020. I’ve heard nothing but amazing (and gory) things about this book, and I really, really want to finish it!

Who doesn’t love Murderbot?!

After THAT ending! I NEED TO KNOW what happens next!

Wish me luck! We’ll see what happens next week!

Why You Need to Read: “The House in the Cerulean Sea”

The House in the Cerulean Sea

By: T.J. Klune

Published: March 17, 2020

Genre: Fantasy

*Winner of the 2021 ALA Alex Award*

            It was set up a hill on a cliff overlooking the ocean. It looked as if it were at least a hundred years old. It was made of brick and had a large turret of all things set right in the middle of the roof. The side of the house facing Linus was covered in green ivy, growing around multiple white window frames. He thought he could see the outline of a gazebo set off next to the house and wondered if there was a garden. He would like that very much. He could walk through it, smelling the salt in the air and—

            He shook his head. He wasn’t here for such things. There would be no time for frivolities. He had a job to do, and he was going to do it right, (FIVE). 

            It’s amazing how a reader comes across a book. In this case, after receiving an eARC, I received a print copy of this book from a giveaway. At the time of this book’s release, the reviews were all about how great and how beautiful the story is, and how everyone should read this book. And, when I started reading the book, I realized the description didn’t do it justice to the story as a whole. The House in the Cerulean Sea by T.J. Klune is a poignant story about family and identity.

            The protagonist is Linus Baker, a middle-aged caseworker in the Department in Charge of Magical Youth (best described as social services for “magical” children). He is the stereotypical vapid and lonesome adult who lives alone—with his cat, Calliope—and focuses on his job, in which he is very good at. In fact, Linus is so good at his job, he receives a summons from Extremely Upper Management to take part in a highly classified assignment: investigate an orphanage on the distant island, Marsyas; report and determine whether or not it should remain open; and, check the well-being of 6 “magically dangerous” children and their caretaker, Arthur Parnassus. It doesn’t sound too bad, until Linus reads the files for each child. That is when Linus realizes this assignment is unlike the other ones he’s had before, and why the files are classified. Linus reads up on the files of the children: Lucy, Talia, Theodore, Chauncey, Sal and Phee. But, he waits to read Arthur’s file because Linus believes it isn’t relevant to the assignment. In addition to the children and Arthur, there is Zoë Chapelwhite, the “Caretaker of Marsyas Island,” and the mentor to one of the children. Each of the children are as unique as their files make them out to be, and Linus is able to see them all as children and NOT the magical beings they are. While Linus has no issues with writing up his reports and bonding with the children, he is puzzled by Arthur’s demeanor, especially when it comes to the humans who reside on the island. Arthur is a complex character, but it is through him that Linus develops as both a character and an individual throughout the story. 

            Although the plot appears to be cliché, it is less straightforward and more complex than presented in the first chapter. In this world, humans and magical beings coexist in society, but they remain segregated from each other. The obvious reason for this is the fear between both groups. Humans fear what they don’t know, and the magical beings fear for their safety (from humans). Linus believes he’s investigating the Marsyas Orphanage because of his ability to “do things by the book.” However, Linus learns quickly about the true intentions of Extremely Upper Management and of Arthur’s reasons for becoming the guardian for these particular children. There are two subplots in this book. The first one surrounds foster care. Just about everyone has heard of (or knows someone who went through or works within) the foster care system—which, includes orphanages and children’s homes—and, the numerous stories—both true and false—about the ongoings that occur within them. This includes visits from caseworkers and social workers. I’m not saying that this book provides “accurate” information—I wouldn’t know—but, there is enough familiarity in this book that brings out the reality within the fantasy. The second subplot involves trauma and fear, and how it is handled. Approximately, half of the characters are dealing with their personal fears and traumas, and they all deal with them in their own way. However, there are positive and negative methods to overcome them, which are explored in this story. These subplots are necessary because they provide more depth and development to both the plot and the characters.

            The narrative follows Linus’ point-of-view in the present, and is told in 3rd person limited narration. This means that the readers know what is happening from Linus’ experiences, and what is told to him by the other characters. This use of narration is essential for the story because of Linus’ role as a case worker. He must be able to understand the children, Zoë and Arthur while maintaining his identity as a human; especially, when Linus is told of the traumas the children have gone through. This makes Linus a reliable narrator. 

            The style T.J. Klune uses for The House in the Cerulean Sea is first and foremost a commentary on stereotypes, especially those placed on children. Ironically, this book was released during the year the world was forced to observe how they operated, and how their societal practices led to social turmoil. In addition, it is children who are taught how the world will perceive them based on these societal norms and practices; and, how it can get better, or worse (usually worse), as they reach adulthood. Earlier, I mentioned foster care systems, but there are several allusions to magical beings across folklore and speculative fiction, including the “smaller details” to what some of us suspected about those magical beings. The mood in this book is paradise. Linus arrives on the island and he is awed instantly by its beauty: the weather, the colors, and the appeal. However, each literary paradise contains its own underlining issue. The tone in this book is the dismantlement of stereotypes and appearances. All of the characters have something within themselves they need to overcome so that they can continue living their lives. 

            The appeal for The House in the Cerulean Sea have been immensely positive. Several readers and critics have had nothing but great things to say about this book. In addition, this novel was named “One of the Best (SFF) Books” of 2020 by everyone from Goodreads to Amazon. This book is a great addition to the speculative fiction canon and it should be read by all fans of the genre, especially for its lighter tone. Recently, this book became one of the recipients of the American Library Association’s (a.k.a. ALA) 2021 Alex Award. And, I’m going to say that this is the first of many accolades this book will receive. 

            The House in the Cerulean Sea is the magical book readers and fans didn’t know they needed. T.J. Klune presents a story about stereotypes surrounding identity, youth, family and appearances; and, it provides a bit of magic to it in order to present it as realistic, and it works. If you are looking for a fantasy story that will make you smile, then look no further. 

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!!!