Why You Need to Read: "A Broken Queen"

The Nine Realms #3: A Broken Queen

By: Sarah Kozloff

Published: March 24, 2020

Genre: Fantasy

NOTE: There are minor spoilers for the previous books in the series. You have been warned. 

            …sure that she was dying with her task unfulfilled, her people condemned to suffering, and the line of Nargis Queens judging her harshly, (Chapter Nine, “Aboard Island Dreamer”). 

            All great stories and storytellers know how to present the events and the plot to the audience. And, in the age of online streaming services, modern audiences started to forget what it’s like to have a cliffhanger and it being drawn out to where one wants their suspicions to be either confirmed or debunked. The Queen of Raiders—Book 2 in The Nine Realms—ended with this type of cliffhanger. Readers suspected that the protagonist did not meet her end, but the mystery of “what happened” and “what is going to happen” is addressed in A Broken Queen, Book 3 in The Nine Realms

            Thalen, Skylark and the Raiders have defeated the Oros in Oromondo. Unfortunately, Skylark is injured during the escape, falls into and is lost to the sea. Believing Skylark is dead, Thalen and the Raiders return to the Free States in order to lift the siege and to end the occupation of the Oros. Meanwhile, Gustie and Hartling do all they can to keep the Resistance going until the Oro army leaves; Matwyck has become drunk on power, finally, and has taken on interfering with the blossoming romance of his son, Marcot; and, the Spirits are becoming more active in their influence on the affairs of their Agents and the other mortals. All the while, Cerúlia—now using the alias, Phénix—ends up in Salubriton in the Realm of Wyeland, which is on the other side of Ennea Món. It is there Cerúlia is able to heal from both her injuries and her traumas. Even though Thalen and all of the denizens of the Free States now have to deal with the aftermath of the war and the occupation, and Matwyck becomes more and more devious with his “regency,” it is Cerúlia who develops the most in this book. This time, she learns empathy through her interactions with the other patients at the recovery house as they heal from ailments that plague the body, the mind, and the soul. At the same time, the Spirits present themselves to being as petty as stagnant as any other divine being. Then again, the conflicts of the Spirits are just as complex as their worshippers! 

            The plot in A Broken Queen is Cerúlia’s determination to reclaim the Nargis Throne after being hidden and in exile for 15 years. Once again, she’s shocked to learn of the lengths Matwyck goes to in order to prevent her return. But first, Cerúlia must regain her strength and come up with a plan for seizing control of Weirandale from the usurpers. There are several subplots as well, and they tie into the plot. First, there is the occupation of the Oromondo army in the Free States. Even though the war is over with a victory for the Free States, the Oros have no plans to leave the place where there is no famine or poisoned water. The war did not resolve the reason for the invasion, which is now becoming the dilemma to be solved by both the Free States and the Oros. Second, is the “Regency” of Matwyck and the toll its taking on the remaining citizens of Weirandale. With more arrests and disappearances, those who remain secretly plan on what to do when the Queen does return to Cascada. At the same time, Matwyck is losing control over his Council as they show themselves to being just as greedy and deceptive as him. This leads him into trying to maintain his last bit of control he has, which he believes is his son. Last, the Spirits—who are upset by the recent events involving Cerúlia—are arguing with each other over grudges of the past and the present. And, they have gone from using their Agents to act on their wills and behalves to overreaching into each other’s Realms: fires and tornadoes, sea storms and lightning, earthquakes, etc. All of these subplots go back to the plot of the Nargis Throne, which remains in chaos because of Matwyck and the other usurpers. It all traces back to what happened at the very beginning of the story. 

            Once again, the narrative is told from multiple characters and their points-of-view. This is a chronological sequence told in first-person P.O.V. and in the stream-of-consciousness of these reliable narrators. Readers will know what is going on everywhere all at once. It should be mentioned that attention should be placed on the characters Cerúlia meets during her recovery in Wyeland because it represents the reality that injury and trauma are not always obtained on a battlefield. And, there are two cases in which readers will see manipulation as an act of desperation to maintain control over what cannot be controlled. Desperate individuals do desperate things. 

            The style Sarah Kozloff uses in A Broken Queen focuses on both the recovery of the injured from the traumas of war and other unspeakable events, and the growing instability amongst the Divine. Although the main focus shifts back to Cerúlia, she’s not the only one who learns empathy through her interaction with other people (and animals). Thalen, Gunnit and Marcot learn how individuals don’t overcome their traumas overnight. Time is essential for recovery, and there are some who never recover. In addition, the reason one country would invade another one is readdressed here and it cannot be overlooked. All of their issues and themes reflect the reality of life as mentioned in history and in journals (both personal and professional/academic) by: soldiers, doctors, nurses, civilians, psychologists and survivors. The mood is somber and bittersweet. This is because while the war is over, the survivors have to deal with the traumas and the aftermath of everything that happened to them and rebuild their lives knowing it’ll never be the same. The tone is resilience and recovery, especially how all of the characters go through the process of becoming whole again. The maps—which were not included in the eARC—and the glossary will assist readers in keeping track of who’s who and where all of the characters are throughout the narrative. 

            The appeal for A Broken Queen will be positive. This is because it is in this book in which the story reaches its climax and some of the plots and the storylines are wrapping up. Fans and readers of The Nine Realms must continue reading the series because the pacing and the narration do not stop and we need to know what happens to our favorite characters. And, while it’ll be sad and difficult to say goodbye once The Cerulean Queen is released, we will all need the closure to the end of the author’s story.

            A Broken Queen continues the adventures and the turmoil wroth throughout The Nine Realms. Only this time it’s not only politicians and armies at work. The characters have grown into who they are and what they have to become given the circumstances. Emotions and trauma are the focus in the book, but the author incorporates them in a way which works with the story instead of it dragging it down. I’m already counting down the days for when I can read The Cerulean Queen! Luckily, we all don’t have to wait too long!

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!!!

The Shortlist Award Reading Challenge 2019—The End

            As some of you may or may not know, I decided to partake of this crazy reading challenge in which, I would read as many of the nominees of the largest book awards for speculative fiction I could by the time the winners were announced. Obviously, this was easier said than done, but I did read a lot of amazing books, and many of them did NOT win the awards. In addition, I learned of more awards that were given to these authors in different regions throughout the world—if anyone knows of an award given in Asia, then please let me know—and I learned more about authors I’ve read or haven’t read before. 

            I suggest that you go to the websites for these awards and take a look at all of the finalists because you might recognize the authors, their works and their other interested. Some of these authors only receive the recognition from these awards. And, I wouldn’t have known who Lauren C. Teffeau and Nick Clark Windo were without doing this project. 

            I did read a lot of the winners and the nominees, but only the winners of each award and category will be listed here. I haven’t written all of the reviews for some of the winners, yet; but, I hope to do so in the near future. Please read my reviews I’ve linked to the books, and let me know what you thought of the winners of these awards. And yes, I’m doing this again for 2020!

Philip K. Dick Award

Winner: 84K by Claire North

Compton Crook/Stephen Tall Award

Honors the Best 1st Science Fiction/Fantasy/Horror Novel of the Year

Winner: The Poppy War by R.F. Kuang

British Science Fiction Association (BSFA) Award

Winners:

            Novel: Embers of War by Gareth L. Powell

            Shorter Fiction: Time Was by Ian McDonald

            Non-Fiction: “On motherhood and erasure: people-shaped holes, hollow characters and the illusion of impossible adventures” by Aliette de Bodard

            Artwork: Likhain’s “In the Vanishers’ Palace: Dragon I and II”

Nebula Awards

Winners:

            Novel: The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal

            Novella: The Tea Master and the Detective by Aliette de Bodard

            Novelette: “The Only Harmless Great Thing” by Brooke Bolander

            Short Story: “The Secret Lives of the Nine Negro Teeth of George Washington” by Phenderson Djèlí Clark

            Game Writing: “Black Mirror: Bandersnatch,” Charlie Brooker

            The Ray Bradbury Award for Outstanding Dramatic Presentation: “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse,” Screenplay by Phil Lord & Rodney Rothman

            The Andre Norton Award for Outstanding Young Adult Science Fiction or Fantasy Book: Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi

The Hugo Awards

Winners: 

            Novel: The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal

            Novella: Artificial Condition by Martha Wells

            Novelette: “If at First You Don’t Succeed, Try, Try Again” by Zen Cho

            Short Story: “A Witch’s Guide to Escape: A Practical Compendium of Portal Fantasies” by Alix E. Harrow

            Series: Wayfarers by Becky Chambers

            Related Work: Archive of Our Own, a project of the Organization for Transformative Works

            Graphic Story: Monstress, Volume 3: Haven, written by Marjorie Liu, art by Sana Takeda

            Dramatic Presentation:

                                                Long Form: “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”

                                                Short Form: “The Good Place: Janet”

            Editor:

                        Short Form: Gardner Dozois

                        Long Form: Navah Wolfe

            Professional Artist: Charles Vess

            Semiprozine: “Uncanny Magazine”   

            Fanzine: “Lady Business”

            Fancast: “Our Opinions Are Correct”

            Fan Writer: Foz Meadows

            Fan Artist: Likhain (Mia Sereno)

            Art Book: The Books of Earthsea: The Complete Illustrated Edition, illustrated by Charles Vess, written by Ursula K. LeGuin   

            Lodestar Award for Best Young Adult Book: Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi

            John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer: Jeannette Ng

Brave New Words Award

Given to an individual who produces break-out literature that is New and Bold.

Winner: Empire of Sand by Tasha Suri

The Arthur C. Clarke Award

Given for Science Fiction Literature

Winner: Rosewater by Tade Thompson

Locus Awards

Winners: 

            Science Fiction Novel: The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal

            Fantasy Novel: Spinning Silver by Naomi Novik

            Horror Novel: The Cabin at the End of the World by Paul Tremblay

            Young Adult Book: Dread Nation by Justina Ireland

            First Novel: Trail of Lightning by Rebecca Roanhorse

            Novella: Artificial Condition by Martha Wells

            Novelette: “The Only Harmless Thing” by Brooke Bolander

            Short Story: “The Secret Lives of the Nine Negro Teeth of George Washington” by Phenderson Djèlí Clark

            Anthology: The Book of Magic edited by Gardner Dozois

            Collection: How Long ‘til Black Future Month? By N.K. Jemisin

            Magazine: Tor.com

            Publisher: Tor

            Editor: Gardner Dozois

            Artist: Charles Vess

            Non-Fiction: Ursula K. LeGuin: Conversations on Writing by Ursula K. LeGuin & David Naimon

            Art Book: Charles Vess, The Books of Earthsea: The Complete Illustrated Edition, Ursula K. LeGuin

British Fantasy Awards

Winners:

            Fantasy Novel: The Bitter Twins by Jen Williams

            Horror Novel: Little Eve by Catriona Ward

            Newcomer: Tasha Suri for Empire of Sand

            Novella: The Tea Master and the Detective by Aliette de Bodard

            Short Fiction: “Down Where Sound Comes Blunt” by GV Anderson

            Anthology: Year’s Best Weird Fiction, Vol. 5, edited by Robert Shearman & Michael Kelly

            Collection: All the Fabulous Beasts by Priya Sharma

            Non-Fiction: Noise and Sparks by Ruth EJ Booth

            Independent Press: Unsung Stories 

            Magazine/Periodical: “Uncanny Magazine

            Audio: Breaking the Glass Slipper (www.breakingtheglassslipper.com)

            Comic/Graphic Novel: Widdershins, Vol. 7 by Kate Ashwin

            Artist: Vince Haig

            Film/Television Production: “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”

2019 World Fantasy Awards

Lifetime Achievement Awards: Hayao Miyazaki, Jack Zipes

Winners:

            Novel: Witchmark by C.L. Polk

            Novella: “The Privilege of the Happy Ending” by Kij Johnson

            Short Fiction (tie): “Ten Deals with the Indigo Sky” by Mel Kassel

                                           “Like a River Loves the Sky” by Emma Törzs

            Collection: The Tangled Lands by Paolo Bacigalupi & Tobias S. Buckell

            Artist: Rovina Cal

            Special Award:

                        Professional: Huw Lewis-Jones for The Writer’s Map: An Atlas of Imaginary Lands

                        Non-Professional: Scott H. Andrews for Beneath Ceaseless Skies: Literary Adventure Fantasy

            Anthology: Worlds Seen in Passing: Ten Years of Tor.com Short Fiction, edited by Irene Gallo

Bram Stoker Awards (2018)

Superior Achievement in a Novel: The Cabin at the End of the World by Paul Tremblay

Superior Achievement in a First Novel: The Rust Maidens by Gwendolyn Kiste

Superior Achievement in a Young Adult Novel: The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein by Kiersten White

Superior Achievement in a Graphic Novel: Victor LaValle’s Destroyer by Victor LaValle

Superior Achievement in Long Fiction: The Devil’s Throat (Hellhole: An Anthology of Subterranean Terror)

Superior Achievement in Short Fiction: “Mutter” (Fantastic Tales of Terror) by Jess Landry

Superior Achievement in a Fiction Collection: That Which Grows Wild by Eric J. Guignard

Superior Achievement in a Screenplay: The Haunting Hill House: The Bent-Neck Lady, Episode 01:05 by Meredith Averill

Superior Achievement in an Anthology: The Devil and the Deep: Horror Stories of the Sea by Ellen Datlow

Superior Achievement in Non-Fiction: It’s Alive: Bringing Your Nightmares to Life by Joe Mynhardt and Eugene Johnson

Superior Achievement in a Poetry Collection: The Devil’s Dreamland by Sara Tantlinger

Aurealis Award (2018)

Recognizes the achievements of Australian science fiction, fantasy and horror writers. 

Winners:

            Young Adult Short Story: “The Sea-Maker of Darmid Bay” by Shauna O’Meara

            Young Adult Novel: Catching Teller Crow by Ambelin Kwaymullina & Ezekiel Kwaymullina

            Science Fiction Novel: Lifel1k3 by Jay Kristoff

            Fantasy Novel (tie): City of Lies by Sam Hawke

                                             The Witch Who Courted Death by Maria Lewis

            Horror Novel: Tides of Stone by Kaaron Warren

            Children’s Fiction: The Endsister by Penni Russon

            Graphic Novel/Illustrated Work: Tales from The Inner City by Shaun Tan

            Horror Novella: Crisis Apparition by Kaaron Warren

            Horror Short Story: “Sub-Urban” by Alfie Simpson

            Fantasy Novella: “The Staff in the Stone” by Garth Nix

            Fantasy Short Story: “The Further Shore” by J. Ashley Smith

            Science Fiction Novella: Icefall by Stephanie Gunn

            Science Fiction Short Story: “The Astronaut” by Jen White

            Collection: Tales from The Inner City, edited by Shaun Tan

            Anthology: The Best Science Fiction & Fantasy of the Year, edited by Jonathan Strahan

            The Sara Douglass Book Series Award: Blackthorn & Grim Trilogy by Juliet Mariller

            Convenors’ Award for Excellence (tie):

                        Cat Sparks, The 21st Century Catastrophe: Hyper-capitalism and Severe Climate Change in Science Fiction (PhD exegesis Curtin University)

                        Kim Wilkins, Lisa Fletcher and Beth Driscoll, Genre Worlds: Australian Popular Fiction in the 21st Century (http://www.genreworlds.com)

Nommo Award (2018)

Recognizes the works of speculative fiction by Africans, defined as “science fiction, fantasy, stories of magic and traditional belief, alternative histories, horror and strange stuff that might not fit anywhere else,” awarded by the African Speculative Fiction Society

Winners: 

            Novel (The Ilube Award): Freshwater by Akweake Emezi

            Novella: The Fire Bird by Nerine Dorman

            Short Story: “The Witching Hour” by Ekpeki Oghenechovwe Donald

            Comic or Graphic Novel: Shuri by Nnedi Okorafor

SPFBO (Self-Publishing Fantasy Blog-Off) 2018 (4th

Started by Mark Lawrence, yes THAT one, with the purpose to “shines a light on self-published fantasy. It exists to find excellent books that might otherwise have gone unnoticed.” The contest starts with 300 books and it gradually narrows down to 10 finalists! The judges are readers who are bloggers and vloggers. Note: some of these authors gain a following and some even earn a publishing contract, so don’t ignore these books!

Winner: Orconomics by J. Zachary Pike

Finalists:

            The Gods of Men by Barbara Kloss

            The Purification Era Book One: Sowing by Angie Gricaliunas

            We Ride the Storm by Devin Madson

            Symphony of the Wind by Steven McKinnon

            The Anointed by Keith Ward

            Conspiracy of Magic Book One: Ruthless Magic by Megan Crewe

            Sworn to the Night by Craig Schaefer

            Iconoclasts Book 1: Aching God by Mike Shel

            Out of Nowhere by Patrick LeClerc

Why You Need to Read: “Realm of Ash”

The Books of Ambha: #2: Realm of Ash

By: Tasha Suri

Published: November 12, 2019

Genre: Fantasy/Historical Fiction/Coming-of-Age

NOTE: Some minor spoilers from Empire of Sand. You have been warned. 

            “My blood—my Amrithi blood in this loyal Ambhan body—is part of the curse. But it’s also part of the cure. I just don’t know how. But the Emperor’s family, your mistress…they might. Perhaps they’ll find answers in my blood that I can’t. You should send me to them, if they’ll have me,” (Chapter Five). 

            In 2018, a debut fantasy novel based on Indian mysticism was released to praise by readers and critics alike; and, Empire of Sand won the 2019 British Fantasy Award for Best Newcomer and the 2019 Brave New Words Award. In 2019, the follow-up, Realm of Ash, picks up ten years after the events in the first book and answers all of the questions in it. It was a long year to wait to read this book by Tasha Suri, and it was worth it. 

            Arwa, Mehr’s younger sister who was spirited away to safety by their stepmother, Maryam, and their father, is all grown-up (she’s 21) and recently widowed from a massacre at Darez Fort. Instead of returning to Hara to live with her parents, Arwa decides to live in a hermitage of widows (for nobility). At the beginning of the novel, Arwa is plagued by guilt for surviving the massacre, for failing in her duties as a wife (to her stepmother’s grief), and for revealing her heritage of being an Amrithi. Arwa believes Mehr died with the Maha, and her parents did everything they could to make sure Arwa didn’t repeat the same mistakes her sister made. Since Arwa looks more Ambhan (lighter skin tone) than Mehr (darker skin tone), she was taught to blend into Ambhan society and view her Amrithi heritage as a curse. However, the last lesson Mehr taught Arwa about their blood is the reason Arwa survived the massacre, and she doesn’t know how to feel about it. After arriving at the hermitage, Arwa meets Gulshera, another widow with connections to the royal family. Arwa asks Gulshera for the chance to serve the royal family and to save the Empire from ruin, an unfortunate effect of the Maha’s death. At the palace, Arwa meets Jihan, the princess, who tells her her assignment, to assist the Emperor’s blessed (bastard) son, Zahir—Jihan’s brother, with his work in occult arts to seek the Maha’s knowledge. Knowledge that could revive the Empire. Readers will see the resemblance Arwa has to Mehr in how the two sisters were sheltered from the truth of their heritage and the Emperor’s power. The more Arwa learns the more she grows into the person she had to suppress as per her stepmother and (Ambhan) gender role expectations. Arwa develops as both a characters and an individual as she makes her way through the complexities of her new status—widow and tool of the Empire—in a society which believes the past has the answers. 

            The plot of Realm of Ash is the fallout based on the ending of Empire of Sand. The Ambhan Empire has fallen on hard times since the Maha’s death. In addition, Arwa’s father was stripped of his governorship due to his behavior towards the Emperor regarding Mehr. For ten years, Arwa was raised with the goal of restoring her family to their previous status while the Empire moved into decline after 400 years of affluence. Arwa’s widowhood and revealed heritage is the chance for Arwa to restore both her family’s glory and the Empire’s prosperity. However, as Arwa and Zahir study more about the Empire’s past with the Amrithi and learn about the motivations the royal family hope to achieve with this knowledge, the two “illegitimate heretics” must determine other factors for saving the Empire. There are two subplots in this novel. The first is the truth which is revealed about the Amrithi and their ties to the Emperor’s and the Maha’s rule. The second is the tension amongst the royal siblings as the Emperor is on his deathbed and must name his successor. Both subplots are related because, as Arwa learns, the Amrithi aren’t cursed, but they were coveted for their abilities and their magic, which were used and abused by the Maha and the royal family for their benefit. These revelations comes as a shock to Arwa because it means that the foundations of the Ambhan Empire are built on lies and corruption, and the royal family made sure that those lies became beliefs within the Empire. Of course, the royal family would prefer if Arwa and Zahir would stay focused on gaining the Maha’s knowledge so that everything can go back to the way things were before his death. It’s too bad Arwa has her sister’s temperament and stubbornness for doing the “right” thing. These subplots enrich the plot in that Arwa’s life gets sidetracked again and she has to decide what to do with the truth she’s learned regarding the Empire and her family. Arwa realizes that the Empire, the Emperor and the Maha are at fault, not her sister and not the Amrithi. 

            The narrative is told from Arwa’s point-of-view as she becomes the hope for reviving the Empire. In Empire of Sand, readers learned about the Amrithi and the Maha from Mehr’s P.O.V.; in Realm of Ash, readers learn about the Ambhan and the Emperor from Arwa’s P.O.V. This provides readers with the two halves of the world-building and an understanding of all of the events across both books. In the case of Realm of Ash, Arwa experiences moments of the past in flashbacks as part of the occult rituals she performs with Zahir. In those memories, Arwa witnesses the horrific truth of her Amrithi heritage, but it leads to her accepting and marveling at it, eventually. The narrative presents Arwa’s change in demeanor and personality as she learns to heal from her traumatic experience and the shame she believed she should have for her Amrithi heritage. All of these elements of the narrative make Arwa a reliable narrator whom can be followed by all readers. 

            Tasha Suri continues to use the same style she used in Empire of Sand in Realm of Ash. She presents the Ambhan Empire as a beautiful place with denizens of various social classes and faiths. Only this time, the author puts more emphasis on the consequences of colonialism, parental influences, magic, and societal expectations and practices. The mood is hardship of a declining society and a loss of purpose in life. The tone is how individuals and society can continue to thrive once they find a new purpose and a new way to live, if given the chance. If Empire of Sand focuses on themes of strength and survival, then the themes in Realm of Ash are based on enduring and resilience!

            The appeal of Realm of Ash surpasses its predecessor, thus making the series, and the author, worthy of all of the praise given to it. Fans of fantasy, and the first book, will want to read this book; and, fans of historical fiction might enjoy this book as well. Both Books of Ambha can be read in either order—amidst minor spoilers—and readers will get the complete experience of the world the author created. The same warnings of violence and abuse from the first book are relevant in this one, but given the historical and societal context of the story, those aspects do not affect the way readers will enjoy the story.

            Realm of Ash is an amazing follow-up to Empire of Sand and answers all the questions readers had from the previous book. It is not unusual for the next book in a series to be better than the first, but Realm of Ash is a stronger story dealing with issues of lost, family, and magic. It also adds to the world-building that was half-finished in the first book, providing a complete and beautiful world that is worth saving. This book was in my top five of my favorite speculative fiction books of 2019, and I’m looking forward to reading more books by Tasha Suri.

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!!!

Why You Need to Read: “Riot Baby”

Riot Baby

By: Tochi Onyebuchi

Published: January 21, 2020

Genre: Speculative Fiction/Contemporary

            The look on her face, that’s what people told me today wasn’t no kind of victory. That when people joke and call me Riot Baby for being born when I was, it ain’t with any kind of affection, but something more complicated. The type of thing old heads and Mama and other people’s parents tell you you won’t understand till you get older, (II, Harlem). 

            Our world is not a utopia, but it’s not a dystopia either. Our world is balanced between the good and the bad, and the beautiful and the ugly. As humanity’s technology emerged with emphasis on the visuals, humanity preferred to use: cameras, camcorders, and videos to capture moments and/or events in life. Although technology is used for selfish reasons, it cannot be denied that we’ve used it in order to capture moments of both the beautiful and the ugly. Yet, it cannot be said that the ugly moments provided elements of truth which details moments of life for all individuals around the world. In the 21st century, this technology serves as a reminder that life is beautiful and ugly due to humanity, and that art imitates life NOT vice versa. 

            Riot Baby by Tochi Onyebuchi is an allegorical narrative about the treatment of “minorities”—specifically Black Americans—in contemporary America. I’m not going to use the sub-genre—dystopia—because it implies, “a very unpleasant imaginary world in…a disastrous future,” (p. 417). Riot Baby focuses on the present, so to categorize it in the dystopia subgenre would be an insult to the many victims of the societal practice. This novella reiterates numerous key moments in America during the last 60 years, most of which there is evidence in the form of both photos and videos. While several outlets of mainstream media and history texts continue to gloss over past and recent events, victims and witnesses know better due to the fear and the knowledge that such events: Rodney King, Trayvon Martin, Sandra Bland, Colin Kapernick, McKinley, Charleston, etc., can and will happen again. Riot Baby is Childish Gambino’s, “This Is America,” presented from a similar perspective in a different format. 

            There are two protagonists, but the story starts with Ella who is around 7-years-old. She lives with her mother in South Central Los Angeles. The year is 1992 and her mother is pregnant. Ella is a very perspective child. One of the reasons for this is because Ella has ESP abilities of an empath and powers that rival Scarlet Witch from X-Men. One day after school, as the Rodney King Verdict is announced, Ella’s mother goes into labor and they have to get to a hospital. After her brother, Kevin, is born, Ella begs her mother to have them move to Harlem believing her rage, and her abilities to feel everyone else’s rage, won’t be as volatile on the East Coast as it is on the West. Several years later, Kev spends his time after school hanging out with his friends outside of a bodega on a street corner, avoiding the notice of both the police and his mother and sister. Some things are easier said than done because Ella cannot control neither her “gift” nor her rage, and Kev can’t do anything to stop himself from becoming another statistic in American society. Soon, Kevin is in jail and Ella “jumps” all over the world observing the ways other people live. The brother becomes indifferent and the sister becomes even more enraged.

            As Kev serves his (exaggeratedly long) sentence in Rikers State Penitentiary, Ella experiences rodeos in Louisiana, horse races in Belmont, the shooting of Sean Bell, the police “raid” at a pool party in McKinley, Texas and the mass shooting in Charleston, South Carolina. Kev, in his youth, becomes worn down in prison and Ella becomes so angry that she seeks advice from her mother and her mother’s acquaintances. Kev is comfortable with the “life” provided for him in prison and on parole. Ella explains to him how both are restrictive forms of freedom, and the only way to achieve freedom is to act on their anger. 

            Throughout the narrative, readers witness the events and the treatment Ella and Kev experience throughout their lives and the helplessness they feel over and over again. From Kev’s point-of-view and stream-of-consciousness, readers witness how Black Men are treated in America’s systematic racism from racial profiling to prison (and juvenile detention) to parole. From Ella’s point-of-view, readers experience the world beyond Black America, and moments from the past, including the ones her mother lived through. Ella’s stream-of-consciousness (and empathic powers) allows for readers (and Ella) to feel all of the emotions everyone else is expressing, which leaves her (and us) wondering why more people are not upset with this treatment within society. Given the pace and the moments in U.S. history and society, both Ella and Kev are reliable narrators. 

            The style Tochi Onyebuchi uses for Riot Baby is a social commentary of recent events told with the lenses of speculative fiction. The mood in this novella is rage from mistreatment and oppression in a society. The author makes several references referring to race relations in the U.S.: Rodney King and the L.A. Riots, Sean Bell, Charleston, McKinley, Spike Lee, Black women and childbirth, George Washington Carver, the Confederate Flag, hoodies, neo-Nazis, music—particularly rap, etc. The tone reflects the way one should feel about all of the mistreatment Ella learns and that it is okay to feel anger towards this mistreatment, the same mistreatment which converted her brother into a docile servant of American society. Using superpowers, the author illustrates what will eventually happen if these practices continue.  

            Riot Baby will appeal to fans of both speculative fiction (i.e. comics, manga and graphic novels) and history (i.e. social commentary). Systematic racism continues to be an issue throughout the world, and fans who want to read about this issue in a different style of writing should read this book. Anyone who has read: Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates and the MARCH Trilogy by John Lewis will appreciate the themes and the message found within Riot Babythe most.  

            Riot Baby is a parable (“a very short narrative about human beings presented…with a general thesis or lesson that the narrator is trying to bring home to his audience,”) about systematic racism and its practices throughout America (p. 9). Both the story and the title emphasizes that anger continues to build up due to mistreatment, oppression and fear and it’s all felt by one and many. Tochi Onyebuchi presents a believable story about the risks society takes when they ignore the harsh practices and restrictions of a group of people. Riot Baby uses the concept of mutant powers in order to deliver another approach to contemporary American society.

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!!!

                                                                        Works Cited

Abrams, M.H., and Geoffrey Galt Harpham. A Glossary of Literary Terms. Tenth ed., Wadsworth, 2005. 

Why You Need to Read: “The Rage of Dragons”

The Burning #1: The Rage of Dragons

By: Evan Winters                                               Audiobook: 16 hours, 15 minutes

Published: July 16, 2019                                    Narrated by: Prentice Onayemi

Genre: Fantasy/Military/Historical Fiction/Folklore

            And if Tau didn’t feel better, it had to be because there was still so much to do. He needed to go to Kigambe and test to become an Ihashe. Then he’d have military status and the right to blood-duel anyone in the Chosen military. The old law was the only way a Lesser could kill a Noble with impunity, (Chapter Three, Fallen).

            2019 was an amazing year for debut authors, especially in the speculative fiction genre. Without listing all of the names of the authors who helped elevate the genre with their stories, some of them are using “older,” “classic,” and “overused” tropes in the genre. However, just like how other authors such as: George R.R. Martin, Philip Pullman and Brandon Sanderson have written their stories mixing “classic” tropes with “unexpected, but believable” twists. Evan Winter is the latest author to incorporate this sort of narrative into his stories. The Rage of Dragons—the first book in The Burning Series—is an African-inspired epic fantasy story, which starts off with war, dragons and revenge, but grows into a rich tale with realistic characters, great world-building, and a believable society whose cultural and socioeconomical practices reflect those of our actual history. 

            Tau is the protagonist in this novel. He is an adolescent who is old enough to “Test” in order to enter the military of the Omehi, his tribe. He is the son of a High Common woman and a Lesser man (his mother ran off with Tau’s father, Aren, only to return to her family after Tau was born). Although tradition and status come from the mother—Tau’s surname is Tafari—Tau is raised and treated as his father’s son. Tau is very much aware of his place in life (servitude) and what his expectations are supposed to be (military life). However, Tau desires a simple life: land and a family with his crush, Zuri—a handmaiden. So, he comes up with a dangerous, yet practical way to gain those desires. Unfortunately, Tau never gets the chance to put his plan into action. Within one day, Tau loses all he holds dear to him and he must flee from his home before he is executed. From that day, Tau is consumed with anger and a new plan: to become an Ihashe warrior, the best one in living memory. After arriving in the capital—and barely surviving the Testing—Tau becomes an Ihashe Initiate and is placed in a Scale (or Unit) led by Umgondisi (Captain or General) Jayyed Ayim—a former adviser to the Guardian Council—who has a special interest in Tau and the other Initiates in his Scale. It is this moment when Tau decides to go by his father’s surname, Solarin. Throughout his training, Tau works harder than any other Initiate, honing his growing anger into his weapons training. He is not alone during the training. He is accompanied by: Hadith, who is known for his strategic planning; Uduak, a huge Initiate who is more aware of Tau’s anger than anyone else; and, Zuri, an Initiate of the Gifted—a female whose powers can call dragons. Throughout the novel, Tau becomes the warrior he wants to be and gets closer and closer to his goal towards vengeance. However, Tau’s anger remains within him and he lacks both an outlet and a support system for his grief and his anger. His companions keep him grounded, but how long will these characters stand with Tau knowing his anger can burst into a fit of rage at any moment? 

            The plot of this novel is Tau’s path to take revenge on those who left him with nothing. As much as this sounds like the trope of “the son getting revenge for his father’s death,” Tau neither finds a mentor nor finds companionship within his Scale. Instead, Tau isolates himself as much as possible from other people and focuses on his training instead of his raging emotions and how those could affect his fighting techniques while doing drills with his Scale. Some readers will notice that Tau’s method of dealing with his emotions can lead Tau to having a mental breakdown. There are two main subplots in this novel. The first one is Tau’s training. The author is not only writing a story about one’s path towards vengeance, but also a fantasy story which is influenced heavily in military history and strategy. As Tau goes through his training, both Tau and the readers learn about fighting stances, strategic planning and battle formations, all of which are practiced and exercised over and over throughout the narrative. This subplot serves as a device for time. It’s going to take years for Tau to become the warrior he wants to become, and the length of training all of the Initiates undergo makes the story more realistic. The second subplot is the division between the Omehi and the Xiddeen, and between the Nobles and the Lessers of the Omehi. For almost 200 years (and since the Omehi landed on the beach), both the Omehi and the Xiddeen have been at war. Recent events have caused rumors of a potential truce between the two warring tribes. However, after fighting for generations, what other lifestyle could await the armies? Will they lose their purpose? As for the division between the Nobles and the Lessers, Tau is proof that such unions are possible. Socioeconomic status is a constant universal issue and theme in human history and culture. When the truce promises to bring an end to the division between Lessers and Nobles, which group from which tribe will rebel and which one will comply? These subplots are necessary for the plot because they embellish the world-building in the story and remind readers of Tau’s initial reasons for joining the army. The plot develops at an appropriate pace; and, the subplots are necessary for the plot because they are “breaks” from the military aspect of the story which are as severe as the issues on the Homefront. 

            The narrative is told in first person point-of-view in present time. With the exception of the prologue, the epilogue, and a handful of chapters in between, the narrative is told from Tau’s viewpoint. Tau’s hardships, training and motivations are written in sequence with his stream-of-consciousness so that readers know what he is thinking and experiencing with his actions, concurrently. The change of characters’ P.O.V. demonstrate not only how Tau presents himself to those around him, but also presents the conflicts the other characters are dealing with at the same time (hint: they’re based on the subplots). While Tau is a ticking timebomb, he is a reliable narrator. The narrative is well-written—even with the jumps in the P.O.V.s—and they can be followed by the readers. 

            The style Evan Winter uses in his novel focuses on the history of violence between two conflicting sides. The use of power, strength and abilities in the author’s writing is part of his central theme of violence. Yes, this story is influenced by African history and folklore, but the violence and the emotions can originate from any individual throughout the world past and present. The military aspect of the story will remind readers that this is an epic military fantasy, not just a story containing traditional fantasy tropes. The mood in The Rage of Dragons is one of anger and warfare which is expressed and reflected amongst all of the characters in the author’s world. The tone is how the elements that make up the mood are dealt with by these characters; should they find a truce or submit to their unstable emotions and desires? The mood matches the tone in the themes of war, violence and division. 

            The appeal for The Rage of Dragons have been positive. The debut novel has been called “one of the best fantasy books of 2019” by several critics. And, it was one of my favorite speculative books of 2019! Any readers who are fans of world-building, magic and dragons will enjoy this book. Fans of military fantasy will enjoy this story, too. I listened to the audiobook of this novel and Prentice Onayemi’s performance and narration was the best choice for this book. This is because both his accent and his pronunciation of the words and the terminology made the story more realistic. It does take some getting used to, but the audiobook is worth listening to. There are some concerns by a few readers about the use of “worn out fantasy tropes.” My answer to that is Tau’s story starts down that route, but the focus shifts towards something else, which foreshadows future events forthcoming in the sequel, The Fires of Vengeance. Only Evan Winter knows which tropes he’ll stick with and which ones he’ll twist. 

            The Rage of Dragons is the latest work of fantasy that combines dragons with African influences. What starts off as a trope for one individual’s vengeance evolves into a military story about the struggles for power and the purpose of war. The idea that war can be used for world-building is nothing new. However, the emotional toll of the training and the fighting in a war within a corrupted society containing dragons will remind fantasy fans of one or two popular series. That being said, Evan Winter gifted fantasy fans with an action-packed military tale that should not be missed. 

My Rating: Enjoy It (4.5 out of 5). 

Why You Need to Read: “The Kingdom of Copper”

The Daevabad Trilogy #2: The Kingdom of Copper

By: S.A. Chakraborty

Published: February 21, 2019

Genre: Fantasy/Historical Fiction

            She shook her head. “Whatever the consequences, Dara acted to protect my daughter from a fate I fought for decades. I cannot fault him for that. And if you think Ghassan wasn’t looking for a reason to crack down on the Daevas the instant a Nahid and Afshin strolled through the gates of Daevabad, you clearly do not know him at all.” She gave them another sharp look. “Tearing each other apart is not why we are here,” (4, Dara). 

            As I mentioned in my review of The City of Brass, the first book in The Daevabad Trilogy, this is a series in which the characters and the world are influenced by Middle Eastern history, culture and folklore. Yet, the story of political power, corruption and struggle is a universal theme in stories and an issue within our world. The Kingdom of Copper expands both the influences and the themes in the magical world S.A. Chakraborty presents to us.

            The story takes place 5 years after Dara’s—short for Darayavahoush e-Afshin—death and resurrection, Nahri’s forced marriage to Prince Muntadhir, and Prince Alizayd’s—Muntadhir’s younger brother—exile to Am Gezira for plotting against his father, King Ghassan al Qahtani. Dara has been resurrected by Manizheh, Nahri’s mother—who faked her death in order to protect herself and her family—so that he can assist her in leading a rebellion against King Ghassan for his treachery and in order to reclaim the throne that was held by the Nahids—the ancestors and tribe of Nahri and Manizheh. Nahri is now wife to Muntadhir, the king’s son and heir, is the new Banu Nahid, or royal healer, and is trapped in the gilded cage of the palace with no one she can trust. She uses her healing gifts and her desire to be a physician in order to cope with her current scenario and unwanted status. Prince Ali has settled in a small community in an oasis in Am Gezira away from his father’s assassins and members of his mother’s family (who want him on the throne). During his exile he learns how to control the abilities gifted to him by the marid, water spirits, on the night he slew Dara. All three protagonists are in scenarios based on the poor choices they made 5 years ago. They all have to live with the consequences of their actions and find other methods to achieve their original goals. Dara, Nahri and Ali develop further into maturity and they must find a way to maneuver through the unrest between ruling classes and amongst the six tribes of the djinn. The complexity of their situations mirror the complexity of their characteristics. 

            The plot continues from where The City of Brass left off. King Ghassan continues to subdue his subjects—mostly the shafit (those of mixed human and djinn heritage)—to harsh treatment and brutal punishments for minor offenses. Ghassan believes with Ali exiled for his betrayal, the death of the last of the Afshins (a.k.a. Dara), and his dominance over Nahri and the supporters of the Nahids he’ll remain in control. However, the king’s enemies have learned how to work underground and soon of the king’s subjects will revolt against the descendants of the rebel who overthrew the Nahids from power. This plot was the subplot in the first book, and it proves how relevant it is to this story’s narrative. There are two main subplots. The first regards Dara and his failure to protect Nahri is the latest of his long list of failures. Due to his imprisonment before meeting Nahri, Dara hasn’t had time to deal with the consequences of his actions that led to the death of his family. Not to mention, Dara’s memories are becoming clearer and he’s starting to remember the events that led to his actions from centuries ago, and those memories are causing him to question whether or not his alliance with Manizheh will lead to similar consequences. The second subplot focuses on the concept of identity and what it means for both Nahri and Ali. Nahri knows she is descended from the Nahids, but she’s not sure what that means. She doesn’t trust anyone in Daevabad, so promises of better things to come by the priests and the other healers means nothing to her. At the same time, Nahri stumbles over information as to how and what her ancestors were really like during their reign in Daevabad and what the Daeva priests expect from her. Meanwhile, Ali learns that he has more abilities than the ones “gifted” to him by the marids. Once again, Ali must find a way to keep his family safe while protecting the denizens of Daevabad from his father’s tyranny. These subplots move along with the plot at an appropriate rate providing development of the plot and the characters, and a way to continue the world-building left off in the first book. 

            The narrative continues from the points-of-view of Dara, Nahri and Ali. Once again, the P.O.V.s are 3rd person limited narrative; meaning they know only what is happening around them at that moment, which means the narrative is told in real time. Readers are aware of each protagonist’s thoughts thanks to their stream-of-consciousness, and because there are moments when one protagonist knows more than the other two at random intervals. All three protagonists are reliable narrators and they provide readers with everything that is going on with all of the characters—including moments of foreshadowing—which, can be followed easily due to the narrative’s sequence.

            The style S.A. Chakraborty uses continues from The City of Brass to The Kingdom of Copper. The history and the folklore of the Middle East—during the Ottoman Rule—continues to influence the story, and the themes of tyrannical rule and rebellion and its endless cycle within the story. The mood in this book is one of tension brought on by corruption and mistreatment of people and the fighting amongst the tribes and the growth of that tension. The tone in this story is how someone should react when tensions are to the point where unrest is coming and how someone should prepare themselves for it regardless of how others want them to act. Trusting one’s instincts is the only way someone can hope to survive when unrest is inevitable. 

            The appeal towards The Kingdom of Copper buildup from the first book. Readers and critics alike praised the author for continuing her fantasy story using her method of storytelling, which led to compliments about the story’s structure by a few readers. Now that the stakes have been raised, fans can only hope for more from S.A. Chakraborty. The critical acclaim will keep the book in popularity and in the fantasy canon. And, fans will be eager to read the story’s conclusion in The Empire of Gold when it is released. 

             The Kingdom of Copper is a strong sequel in The Daevabad Trilogy. The pacing of the world-building and the conflicts go at a more appropriate rate this time, and the input of a realm’s forgotten history makes the story more realistic. The complexity of the characters make them all the more tragic, yet lovable. This novel makes the upcoming conclusion to this trilogy to be very promising. 

My Rating: Enjoy It (4.5 out of 5)!

Why You Need to Read…My Most Anticipated Speculative Fiction Books of 2020

2020 is coming and so are the books. Many of them are to be expected because they are follow-ups or sequels to previous books in a series. Others are either new or standalones books that have piqued our interests. Here is a short list of the books I’m excited to read in the new year (and, new decade). Note: if there is a book that is NOT listed here, then it is because either no release date has been announced, or I have not yet read the previous book(s) in that series. Also, keep in mind that intended release dates can change due to multiple reasons. This is based on the dates stated on the day this was posted. 

#1 The City We Became (The City #1) by N.K. Jemisin à March 26, 2020

            Many of us have been waiting for N.K. Jemisin to follow-up on her success of The Broken Earth Trilogy and we won’t have to wait much longer. This urban fantasy is a follow-up of the author’s short story, “The City Born Great,” and it appears to be an expansion of the “mythology” she mentioned in it. The focus is on New York City and its five protectors as they come together to protect the city from an ancient evil. As a New Yorker, I’m curious to see which aspects of City life the author decided to incorporate into her story. 

#2 The Network Effect (The Murderbot Diaries #5) by Martha Wells à May 5, 2020

            When it was announced that there would be a novel to continue The Murderbot Diaries series, I not only added the novel to my TBR list, but also made sure I was either able to claim an ARC of the book, or to preorder a copy of it! All we know of the plot so far is that Murderbot has to choose between saving his human friends and binge watching his favorite TV show. We already know what it’s going to do, and the story is going to be epic! I’m glad the author chose to continue this series!

#3 The Shadow Saint (The Black Iron Legacy #2) by Gareth Hanrahan à January 7, 2020

            This one shouldn’t surprise anyone. The Gutter Prayer was my favorite speculative fiction book of 2019, and the sequel, The Shadow Saint, has been on my TBR list since I started reading the first book in the series. The sequel takes place six months after the events in The Gutter Prayer. All we know is that the two warring factions—probably the ones from the first book—are competing against one another in search of a rumored weapon. It’s not clear whether or not any of the characters from the first book will appear in the second one, but if The Shadow Saint is anything like its predecessor, then we have nothing to worry about. 

#4 Daughter from the Dark by Marina & Sergey Dyachenko à February 11, 2020

            Vita Nostra was my favorite book of 2018, so you know I’m looking forward to reading this book by the husband and wife duo! This is a standalone novel is about a man who saves a 10-year-old girl from danger, who claims to be a music prodigy who is searching for her missing brother. Not sure whether or not the girl is a con artist, the man does everything he can in order to get the girl to leave, but every time he does, a “protector” thwarts him. All the while, darker forces threaten to separate the two before either of them can determine whether or not there’s a connection between them. 

#5 Ten Arrows of Iron (The Grave of Empires #2) by Sam Sykes à August 4, 2020

            Seven Blades in Black was my surprise read of 2019 and I’ve been anticipating the sequel since I finished it! Based on the synopsis, Sal is alone after the events of the previous book. However, she gains new purpose when she is asked to participate in a heist on the airship fleet, the Ten Arrows, in order to steal power for a mysterious patron. Things turn for the worse when Sal uncovers yet another conspiracy which may or may not with the death and the destruction of the world, again. If Ten Arrows of Iron is anything like its predecessor, then I already know it’s going to be fast-paced and full of action!   

#6 The Girl and the Stars (Book of the Ice #1) by Mark Lawrence à April 30, 2020

            The author is basing his new series in the same world as in the Book of the Ancestor Trilogy. Except now, readers will be transported to the Ice instead of a convent. Yaz is an ice triber who survives the harsh environment based on the ways of her people. However, she is separated from that life and everyone she knows and Yaz has to learn how to survive in a world she never knew existed. Fans and readers get to return to Abeth for a new story set in a world we only got a glimpse of before. 

#7 The Empire of Gold (The Daevabad Trilogy #3) by S.A. Chakraborty à June 30, 2020

            Daevabad has fallen to the rebels, unrest has erupted amongst the denizens, and magic has disappeared from the world. Meanwhile, both Nahri and Ali are safe in Cairo but decide to save their loved ones in the fallen kingdom. At the same time, Dara must confront his guilt while working alongside Banu Manizheh in order to bring some stability to the kingdom they’ve managed to overtake. The Empire of Gold is the final book in the author’s trilogy and we’re wondering who will survive the final fight for power within Daevabad. 

#8 The Burning God (The Poppy War #3) by R.F. Kuang à November 19, 2020

            There is no synopsis for this book, but here’s my hypothesis. The final book in The Poppy War Trilogy sees Rin struggling with the few friends she has left after more death and betrayal from both allies and enemies. However, she might have figure out the secret to the Empress’ power, but before she can do anything, she must face-off against the colonizers and those who betrayed her. 

#9 Legacy of Ash (Legacy Trilogy #1) by Matthew Wardà April 7, 2020 (Print)

            This debut novel focuses on three protagonists with different motivations must work together in order to save their country from a hostile empire. This is easier said than done, but are old hatreds and grudges worth it when their empire is about to fall to destruction? The eBook is available to purchase, but I know many are awaiting to read the printed format. 

#10 The Nine Realms by Sarah Kozloff à    

#1: A Queen in Hiding à January 21, 2020

#2: The Queen of Raiders à  February 18, 2020      

#3: A Broken Queen à  March 24, 2020

#4: The Cerulean Queen à   April 21, 2020

            Fantasy readers are in for a treat! The Nine Realms is a new series and both the author—who is making her debut—and the publisher—Tor Books—are releasing all four books within four consecutive months! Instead of waiting until after the author writes the next book in the series, each book will be released so that readers can enjoy the series—all 1,968+ pages of it—within a short time span. In other words, the time between each novel is more than enough time for readers to read and to process each one. The efforts of both the author and the publisher are appreciated immensely!

            The series is a fantasy bildungsroman and it follows Cérulia, Princess of Weirandale, who is starts off as an exiled and hunted orphan who is determined to do whatever it takes to reclaim the throne that is her birthright. Readers will get to experience the protagonist as she learns magic and how to fight; to participating in a battle against the invaders; to recovering from both visible and invisible scars caused by the war; to reclaiming her throne and establishing herself as a ruler and restoring order to the realm that was left in chaos. This journey sounds so promising that it’s no wonder the author and the publisher decided to release the books in consecutive months!  

#11 The Ranger of Marzanna (The Goddess War #1) by Jon Skovron à April 21, 2020

            Two siblings find themselves on opposing sides of allegiance to the Empire. After their father is murder by imperial soldiers, one will seek to destroy the Empire, while the other will strive to protect it. Sonya is a Ranger of Marzanna, an ancient sect of warriors and her brother, Sebastian, is the most powerful sorcerer in the world. What will happen when the siblings face-off against each other? 

#12 The Obsidian Tower (The Gate of Secrets #1) by Melissa Caruso à June 4, 2020

            The granddaughter of the ruler of a kingdom has broken magic. Although Ryx is mage-marked, all she can do is drain the life from everything she touches, making her place in society unstable. However, after she kills a visiting dignitary and activates a mysterious magical artifact, both by accident, she flees and meets up with a group of unlikely magical experts who are investigating the disturbances of the kingdom. Once, Ryx learns that her family is in danger, she risks everything to save them and to gain control of the same artifact she activated. The Obsidian Tower is the first book in a new series by the author of the Swords and Fire trilogy. 

#13 Call of the Bone Ships (The Tide Child Trilogy #2) by R.J. Barker à September 2020

            There is little to no information about this book and I had to confirm the rumored anticipated release date with the author. My hypothesis: the Tide Child continues its voyage into uncharted territory in order to determine whether or not the “sea dragons” are as endangered as everyone else believes them to be. At the same time, the crew must fend off any suspicious and curious ships whom decide to follow the path of their voyage. 

#14 The Fires of Vengeance (The Burning #2) by Evan Winter à July 16, 2020

            All that is known about this sequel to The Rage of Dragons is that it takes place after the events in the first book. I’m going to make a hypothesis and say that the story follows Tau as he continues his path towards vengeance for his father’s death and the betrayal of his warrior brothers. The Fires of Vengeance is a continuation of the war between two nations, but loyalties have altered since the end of Book One. 

#15 The Memory of Souls (A Chorus of Dragons #3) by Jenn Lyons à August 25, 2020

            I haven’t started to read The Name of All Things, the second book in A Chorus of Dragons Trilogy, but I know I’ll be done with it in time to read The Memory of Souls, the last book in the same trilogy. Kihrin has managed to convince everyone of the plans of his enemies to release the dark god, thus ending the world. There might be a way to prevent this from happening, but at the cost of all of the immortals. However, will Kihrin have to make the ultimate sacrifice in order to save the world? Is he willing to do that? 

#16 The Unspoken Name (The Serpent Gates #1) by A.K. Larkwood à February 11, 2020

            If you were supposed to die, but were then given the opportunity to live, then would you take it? Csorwe was supposed to be a sacrifice for the gods, but a mage gives him the chance to live, with some conditions. All he has to do is become a thief, train as a spy and an assassin, topple an empire and help the mage reclaim his seat of power. What’s the problem? Well, it turns out that Csorwe was supposed to be sacrificed for a reason; and the gods never forget. 

#17 The Wolf of Oren-Yaro (Chronicles of the Bitch Queen #1) by K.S. Villoso à February 18, 2020

            Queen Talyien was a hero of the War of the Wolves and set to marry the son of her father’s rival. Unfortunately, he vanishes before their reign can begin and the fragile peace crumbles. Years later, the Queen receives a message and she crosses the sea towards the meeting place. She survives an assassination attempt and now must find a way home while surviving through a hostile land. The Wolf of Oren-Yaro is the debut novel of a new epic fantasy series by this up-and-coming author. 

#18 The Protectorate #2 by Megan E. O’Keefe à August 18, 2020

            The sequel to Velocity Weapon takes place after the events in that novel. After the truth of Sanda’s imprisonment abroad Bero—whom escape from both Nazca and the Protectorate—she and Tomas flee before she can become a pawn of the greater powers. All they have are coordinates to a dead gate with no way to survive there. Unsure of what to do, Sanda and Tomas might have to plead to the only group willing to assist them, Nazca.

#19 Docile by K.M. Szpara à March 3, 2020

            Dociline is a drug. It is given to Dociles when they serve out their contracts of servitude to those who own them. However, there are negative side effects to this drug and for some reason only Elisha is willing to avoid the drug. When his contract of servitude is purchased by the family of the creators of the drug, Elisha refuses to take it. This puts him at odds against Alexander Bishop III, who believes he can turn Elisha into a Docile without the drug. This story is a parable about sex, love, corruption and capitalism.  

#20 Strange Exit by Parker Peevyhouse à January 14, 2020

            Lake, the seventeen-year-old protagonist in this story, seems to be the only one who knows that the world she and everyone is living in is in fact a simulation. For some unknown reason, after a nuclear event everyone’s bodies have remained in stasis and their minds are trapped within a shared virtual reality all aboard a spaceship. The only way to get off the ship is to remind all of the passengers that they are living in a virtual reality. Lake is accompanied by Taren, but he doesn’t share the same views about saving everyone as she does and soon they are both of them are in a race to locate the heart of the simulation so that everyone can get off the ship dead or alive. 

Additional Books to Lookout For:

Come Tumbling Down (Wayward Children #5) by Seanan McGuire à January 7, 2020

Stormsong (The Kingston Cycle #2) by C.L. Polk à February 11, 2020

The Killing Fog (The Grave Kingdom #1) by Jeff Wheeler à March 1, 2020

Race the Sands: A Novel by Sarah Beth Durst à April 21, 2020

Aurora Burning (The Aurora Cycle #2) by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff à May 5, 2020

The Only Good Indians by Stephen Graham Jones à May 19, 2020

The Order of the Pure Moon Reflected in Water by Zen Cho à June 23, 2020

Ashes of the Sun (Burningblade & Silvereye #1) by Django Wexler à July 21, 2020

The Invisible Life of Addie La Rue by V.E. Schwab à October 6, 2020

Between Earth and Sky (Anasazi Series #1) by Rebecca Roanhorse à TBA 2020

            These are some of the many books I plan to read in 2020. There are so many other books to expect—some to be released in 2020 and others beyond 2020—but, these are the ones I’m going to start reading, immediately. As for the obvious anticipated books that were not listed here, don’t worry I plan on making my way through the previous books in those series so that I can read the follow-ups as soon as they are released. Which books are you excited for the most in 2020 Are there any other buzzworthy books to lookout for?