Why You Need to Read: “Aurora Rising”

The Aurora Cycle: #1: Aurora Rising

By: Amie Kaufman & Jay Kristoff

Published: May 7, 2019

Genre: Young Adult, Science Fiction

            “Scarlett Jones (diplomat) introduces the other members of our squad. ‘Tyler Jones, our commander. Zila Madran, science officer. Finian de Seel. Engineer. Catherine Brannock, pilot. And finally, Kaliis Idraban Gilwraeth, combat specialist’.” (Chapter 7, Kal).

            I’ve always been curious to read stories by authors who write multiple genres of literature. Jay Kristoff has written several amazing stories within the sub-genres in both the fantasy and the science fiction genres. Now, he’s back with a new series with Amie Kaufman—who co-wrote The Illuminae Files with Kristoff—to present us with Aurora Rising, the first book in The Aurora Cycle. Jay Kristoff has described the series as a cross between The Breakfast Club and The Guardians of the Galaxy, which piques a reader’s curiosity. 

            This series is different from many other ones in that the story occurs after the characters graduate from school. Aurora Academy is a military school for future space cadets; and, after they graduate, there is a draft in which the top commanders get to pick their crew members for their first set of missions. Tyler Jones, who is The Top of his Class, missed the draft because he decided to explore a restricted section of a dimension—The Fold—used for space travel, stumbled upon a ship that was lost over 200 years ago, and rescued its only survivor—a girl who is the same age as him, technically. The good news is that his twin sister, Scarlett—who is a trained diplomat—and their best friend, Cat Brannock—a pilot nicknamed “Zero”—bail on the draft in order to join his crew. Unfortunately, those who make up the rest of Tyler’s crew—the science officer, the engineer, and the combat specialist—are the ones no one else wanted in their crew: an aloof girl with a trigger finger, a handicapped boy with a motormouth, and an ostracized male whose species is in the midst of a civil war and he’s not fighting in it. Then, there’s Aurora Jie-Lin O’Malley—or Auri—the girl who slept in cyro for over 200 years, who awakens with mystical powers and with the top intergalactic police forces deeming her a criminal and are attempting to arrest her. Meet Squad 312! All of these characters have flaws and with them being 17 years-old, they don’t know how to deal with their insecurities, which make all of these characters more relatable and more believable. 

            Both the plot and the narrative are told in the point-of-views of all 7 characters! Multiple P.O.V.s are NOT new for YA books, for it allows for both character development and plot development. For example, Tyler is a leader, who jumps to conclusions surrounding his crew members—with the exception of his sister—and he would rather follow orders than question them. Kal’s species is in the middle of a civil war and he must choose between serving his tenure with Squad 312 or leaving to participate in the war. Then, there’s Auri, who is dealing with being out-of-time and understanding what is happening to her. 

            The author’s style reminds readers of the reality of space travel. While it’s exciting, it’s dangerous and requires training and knowledge in order to endure it. Auri almost dies after spending over 200 years in cryostasis; Kal’s people are decimating each other in a civil war, which broke a treaty, which had dire consequences; and, an intergalactic coverup is the real threat to the universe. Both the mood and the tone match what Kaufman and Kristoff are exploring in this series: space is vast, mysterious, and archaic. Add an element of danger that is as realistic as space travel and you have a story told by these authors. Both authors do an excellent job illustrating the differences between the star students and the outcasts. However, school is out, and so are the treatments they were all used to receiving. Both the mood and the tone display the need for these characters to become the adults they need to be!

            The appeal surrounding Aurora Rising will be a positive one, and I say this because there are adolescent readers who are sci-fi fans, who have been craving for a new book series about space explorers who are kids like themselves! In response, Kaufman and Kristoff have come up with a trilogy that reflects the Star Trek series. Young readers will enjoy this novel because the characters are kids who just graduated from school and have to deal with the reality of the “real” world/universe. Adult readers will enjoy this book because it will remind them of how they were like after completing school and continuing on with life. The truth within the fiction is what will appeal to readers the most. And yes, I’m already looking forward to the second book in this series!

            Aurora Rising is a fun sci-fi book that presents the collaboration of two authors to readers who are both familiar and unfamiliar with them. While both the character development and the world-building are well done, the plot leaves more questions than answers, which means there will be a follow up to this book, obviously. Yet, the story is entertaining enough for readers to want more from this trilogy. 

My rating: Enjoy it (4 out of 5). 

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Why You Need to Read: “A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World”

A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World

By: C.A. Fletcher

Published: April 23, 2019

Genre: Science Fiction, Coming of Age, Post-Apocalypse, Dystopian 

            “I wasn’t going home Not then, not yet, or not to my home anyway. I was going to go to his home. I was going to get my dog. I was going to take his boat. And then, when and only if I did that, I would go home,”(Chapter 13, “The tower”).

            The world has ended. However, this post-apocalyptic story does not occur as the world is ending, or immediately after the world ends. Instead, the story follows the descendants of those survivors; these people are living in what remains of the world 100 years later. And yes, the novel is about a boy who goes on a journey to recover his stolen dog. Before you judge the plot of this book, recall the plot of the movie, John Wick.

            Griz is the protagonist and we follow the events of his adventure afterthey happen. Griz lives with his family—parents and brother and sisters—on an island. There are other people who live in this big world, including their neighbors with whom both families make supply runs together. As mentioned in the summary, a thief—named Brand—“stops by the island” and takes one of the family’s dogs. Griz, who believes in family and doing the right thing, takes off after Brand in order to get the dog back. Throughout Griz’s journey, he explores what remains of our world: buildings, wildlife, landscape, etc. Griz learns more about the world because he must survive alone with his knowledge and his instincts to guide him. The few people Griz meets throughout his journey presents both the struggle and the complications surrounding each individual, including Griz. 

            The plot is straightforward. Griz leaves home to chase a thief who stole from his family and took his dog. I would not call this a “hero’s journey” plot; but, instead an adolescent leaves home, learns about the world, and returns a changed person. The plot is coming-of-age; and, the subplot is survival, the man versus nature conflict. It is mentioned throughout the novel that so much time has passed and there are so few people left—according to Griz, approximately 7,000—that a lot of the previous knowledge has been lost and abandoned. Computers and vehicles are no longer operating, medical services have been reduced to herbs and remedies—an injury or an illness can lead to one’s death—and, maps are as useless to someone who doesn’t know where they are compared to someone who is able to travel to those places. The apocalypse not only reduced the human population, but also reduced all helpful knowledge for humanity to thrive. These factors let readers know that Griz’s journey is more complicated than we first believe it to be. 

            The narrative is told from Griz’s point-of-view after the events occurred. Griz is recounting the events of his life and his journey in a blank journal he found during one of his family’s scavenging trips. With limited ways to keep oneself occupied, writing in a journal is a good idea. This narrative could be said to be reliable because the times in which, Griz does catch up with the thief, he doesn’t allow his judgment to cloud over with what the thief tells him about himself and the world. The fact that Griz includes what the thief has to say makes this story more believable because the need to survive is highlighted in this narrative. In addition, Griz mentions parts of the story he decided to omit because it was “irrelevant” to his story. Not only does this make the narrative easier to follow, but also gives the narrative a bit of realism in that not every detail has to be included within a given story. 

            The style the author, C.A. Fletcher, uses makes for a believable “what is” scenario without the mention of zombies. What happens to the world and its survivors years after the world ends? In this case, the world continues as it was, but with limited interference from the actions of humanity. What’s left of any buildings are either safe, or decrepit; all animals roam without fearing humans because there are so few left; and, plants and vegetation thrive where they are with only the elements to concern them. Fletcher’s mood for his story is that the world goes on with or without humans. However, the tone reiterates the darker side of humanity. Yes, Griz and his family were gullible enough to allow a thief into their home, but the thief tells Griz more than once that he is not a “bad guy.” And, the thief is right, to an extent. With so few people and limited resources, there are some people who would resort to darker methods for survival. There are no laws to restrict anyone, anyone could get away with doing just about anything—theft, kidnapping, murder, etc.—and, not worry about consequences or law enforcement. Fletcher gives readers a two-sided notion of a post-apocalyptic world with this style of writing. 

            Anyone who is a fan of post-apocalyptic stories will enjoy Fletcher’s novel. As I mentioned before, there are no zombies or first wave attacks in this story; and, this does not happen immediately after the events at the end of the world. And, that’s the appeal of A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World, the aftermath of the apocalypse! Given the approximate age of Griz (16?), adolescent readers will find this novel appealing as well. I can see this novel becoming an assigned book in schools.

            A Boy and His Dog at the End of the Worldis an entertaining dystopian bildungsroman novel that puts a lot of emphasis on the atmosphere of the Earth over the characters. Readers learn from Griz’s experiences that both knowledge of survival and knowledge of people go hand-in-hand. My only issue with this novel is that while Griz learned and accomplished much on his journey, he doesn’t seem changed by it that much. It could be because Griz is telling the story in his journal. The “story doesn’t end with the journey” notion that left me wondering whether or not Griz and his family has more to tell us about their world. Other than that this novel was fun to read. 

My rating: Enjoy It (4 out of 5).

Why You Need to Read: “Binti: The Complete Trilogy”

Binti: The Complete Trilogy                                                      

By: Nnedi Okorafor

Published:  Binti(#1) released September 22, 2015

                 Binti: Sacred Fire(#1.5) released February 5, 2019

                 Binti: Home(#2) released January 31, 2017

                Binti: The Night Masquerade(#3) released January 16, 2018

                Binti: The Complete Trilogyreleased February 5, 2019

Genre: Science Fiction, Afrofuturism, Anthology  

Winner of the Nebula Award for Best Novella 2015 & the Hugo Award for Best Novella 2016

PLEASE NOTE: The following contains minor spoilers for all four novellas. You have been warned.

I am Binti Ekeopara Zuzu Dambu Kaipka of Namib (Binti).

            Every once in a while you hear about a story that is so unique and so captivating that it is suggested that everyone should read it regardless if it’s not from their preferred genre of literature. Bintiis a story about a young woman who leaves her home—without her family’s blessing—so that she can take advantage of an once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to attend the most prestigious university in the galaxy, Oomza Uni. She boards a spacecraft and it is traveling to a distant planet, and Binti has never been away from her home before. It seems like the story will pick up pace once the spacecraft arrives; only it is attacked by a “hostile” alien species. This is the first part of the first novella in the series by Nnedi Okorafor—which, won both the Nebula and the Hugo awards for “Best Novella”—and, neither the action, nor the story ends with the first novella! Binti: The Complete Trilogycontains all of the author’s stories in one volume!

            Bintistarts off with a simple plot: a gifted young woman goes against her family’s expectations in order to attend an esteemed university. Readers are introduced to Binti’s intelligence for mathematics, abilities as a harmonizer, and Himba culture. At the same time, readers are reminded that human differences and alien versus human culture clashes exist in the future as well. One particular rivalry between the species quickly becomes the center of the story, quickly. Binti has to find a way to survive her new—and unexpected—predicament, which will be hard because the Meduse, the hostile alien species want her dead. 

            Binti is terrified to the point where it’s easier to blame herself for her current situation rather than realize how sheltered she was back on Earth. Binti soon realizes that she must rely on her abilities and her talent in order to understand the situation and escape with her life. However, Binti is not in control of either her abilities, or the tools she has with her. This means improvising. She soon realizes that her astrolabe allows her to communicate with the Meduse on the spacecraft. Binti is able to come up with a strategy to save herself, the lives at Oomza Uni, and the lives of the people on Earth, including her family. Even though she succeeds, the experience of Binti’s excursion to Oomza Uni changes her in more ways than one.

            Binti: Sacred Fireis the latest story written by the author in this series, but it serves as an interlude between the first and the second books in the series. This tale provides an appropriate look into Binti’s life as a student at the university she saved. She has become friends with one of the Meduse, Okwu, who is now a student at the university as well. Readers gain insight into Binti’s interactions with her classmates and her professors, and her family and friends back home (the ones who are willing to talk to her). 

            Unfortunately, Binti’s new life at Oomza Uni is not as smooth as she hopes. She is suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder from her voyage to the university and from the bullying from a few of the humans who happen to be from a feuding tribe from Earth. Although Binti is hailed as a hero for negotiating a truce, she feels as isolated at Oomza Uni as she did back home. Not to mention, Binti is still dealing with some personal “changes” to her being. 

            Even though Binti is traumatized and isolated, she is not alone. Her friends are with her as she works her way through her adjustments and her traumas. Binti knows that it’ll take a while to get used to her new lifestyle, but it seems like she’ll be getting the full university experience. 

            Binti: Homeis about what is in the title. Binti completes her first semester or year at Oomza Uni and decides to return home to visit her family and to participate in her tribe’s pilgrimage. Binti has made progress at the university: in her classes, in her therapy sessions, and in her reputation as a Master Harmonizer. However, returning home means traveling by spacecraft, and it’s the same one Binti traveled on to get to Oomza Uni.

            The spacecraft—known as The Third Fish—is a living thing that flies in outer space. Binti—who is still suffering from PTSD—decides to stay in the same room she stayed in during her first voyage in order to face her trauma. Throughout the voyage, Binti is able to make some progress of dealing with her panic attacks and flashbacks. However, Binti still has to face her fear of reuniting with her family. And, since she’s lived away from her home for a while, she’s forgotten some of her people’s more casual customs. Binti has changed in more ways than one because of her experiences. Unfortunately, her family and her tribe are static in their ways and are disgusted with Binti’s changes and growth. 

            The purpose of a pilgrimage is for an individual to seek growth through moral and spiritual growth. Oftentimes, that individual becomes enlightened and transformed by the end of their pilgrimage. This is what happens to Binti during her pilgrimage even if it isn’t the pilgrimage she was supposed to go on. The pilgrimage Binti goes on brings her to a new level of personal enlightenment. And, she is made aware of her own prejudices and slowly comes around to accepting the changes she’s been experiencing. At the same time, the prejudices surrounding three different clans have erupted, and Binti—once again—must rely on her skills as a harmonizer in order to diffuse the tensions before war breaks out. 

            Binti: The Night Masquerade starts where Binti: Homeleft off, with Binti rushing back to her family home after her pilgrimage in order to stop a war before it starts. The Night Masquerade is a personification of the coming of a “big change.” To Binti, she interprets it to mean a war is about to start. And, Binti plans on ending it before it can happen.

            Cultures clash, hidden history is revealed, and someone always gets betrayed. The POVs change so that the readers have a better understanding of what is happening during certain parts of the story. Within the conclusion to this series, readers realize that not everyone is willing to accept change, not everyone wants to interact with someone who is “different” from themselves, and not everyone is willing to admit he/she/it/they have flaws. Binti comes to terms with all of this as she returns to Oomza Uni just in time for the upcoming academic year. All of her experiences and changes within herself allow Binti to elevate herself beyond the status of Master Harmonizer. However, Binti wishes to continue her studies, for the time being. 

            It was thrilling to read Bintiagain. And, Binti: The Complete Trilogyallows readers to enjoy all of the Binti stories in tandem. Fans of Nnedi Okorafor and readers of speculative fiction will appreciate this series compilation as much as I did. Reading through Binti’s life as a university freshman reminded me of some of my experiences during my first year of college as well, including the changes in myself and the stagnancy of everything else. Bintiis a story about personal growth through experience and change, and how expectations depend on individual actions, not those of others. This coming-of-age story is pleasing to all readers and it should not be overlooked. And, readers can rejoice knowing that Nnedi Okorafor has plans to continue Binti’s story! 

Why E3 2018 Was Great for Gamers and Relevant for Media

E3 2018 lived up to everyone’s expectations! Now, this isn’t about which games were the best and which moments were the worst (NO MORE MACRHING BANDS). Instead, I want to go into why this year’s E3 was monumental, especially after the great year in gaming that was 2017. Long awaited games, expected sequels and remasters, and surprises told hold of the audience. Death Stranding, Red Dead Redemption 2, Spider-Man, Fallout 76, Devil May Cry 5, Resident Evil 2, and Fire Emblem: Three Houses all look very promising. The announcements for future games are very promising as well, but we’ll have to wait a bit longer for Beyond Good & Evil 2. In addition, for some reason, Sea of Solitudelooks like it’ll be a very engrossing game.

As many gamers know, 2017 was an amazing year for us because so many excellent video games were released (too many to name, but please list your favorite from that year). Many of those games went beyond the expectations of both the gamers and the critics. However, similar to other forms of media, people (outside of the gaming community) believed that it would be another few years before video games experienced another “successful” year like 2017. E3 2018 proved that statement wrong.

Similar to digital TV and modern literature, video games are exceeding expectations by doing two simple things: one, giving the fans what they want; and two, taking chances with something different. First, people still find enjoyment in reading; in fact, many stories (particularly fairy tales, myths and legends, and other forms of folklore) have given inspiration to recent popular novels (i.e.A Song of Ice and Fire, Percy Jackson and the Olympians) and popular video games (i.e. God of War, Okami).

Next, streaming sites such as: Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime have branched from streaming older and recent TV shows and movies, to building themselves up as a network with eclectic shows that reflect the diversity of their subscribers. And, with each risk that is successful, that network branches out more and develops more “risky” shows for the audience. Granted, like network TV, there are shows that have been cancelled, but for every one show that gets cancelled on a streaming site, there are 3 to 5 shows that have a large enough audience for renewal.

2017 was that year for video games, and E3 2018 presented the follow-up to that success. Not only will gamers get the games they want between now and 2019, but also new games were announced that look very promising. And, because gamers try to remain indecisive before playing a video game (that still looks fun to play), many of those games will sell just enough to for a discussion to emerge.

FYI: Awesome Adventures of Captain Spirit will be released for free by Square Enix on Tuesday, June 26thon PC, PS4, and Xbox One. The game is by the studio that made Life Is Strange. I’m curious about this game, and it’s free, so I plan on getting it. If you get to play it before me, then let me know how it is, I appreciate it.

My Favorite E3 2018 Video Games:

1)   The Elder Scrolls VI

2)   Kingdom Hearts 3

3)   Super Smash Brothers Switch

4)   Shadow of the Tomb Raider

5)   The Last of Us Part 2

Which games from E3 2018 were your favorites?

Why Persona 5 is more than an Excellent JRPG

         Phantom Thieves

Shin Megami Tensei: Persona 5 won “Best RPG” at 2017’s Video Game Awards in Los Angeles. The win was no surprise to anyone who was familiar with the series, or with the game company, ATLUS. ATLUS has gained more momentum in the past 15 years thanks to the popularity of Persona 4 (2008) and Demon’s Souls (2009). This company has become known for their inclusion of fantasy and folklore within the gaming narrative and taking risks in developing and releasing video games that may or may not be a game-changer.

The success and the enjoyment of Persona 4 immediately had players and fans anticipating Persona 5. After teasers and delays, gamers received insight into the games’ narrative, presentation, and combat. Not only does Persona 5 returned to its earlier combat and theme, but also it evolved in order to match other video games and desires of their fans and players. The game went back to its darker theme surrounding human nature, and improved on their gameplay mechanics.

The dungeons and the grinding were a huge improvement, and it’s about time! The stealth and the combat make dungeon crawling more entertaining. The art style, the design and the menu illustrate the tone of the game, but it still manages to lure you in. The soundtrack is one of the best of the year, too! The songs, sung by Lyn and, the music, composed by Shoji Meguro, are catchy and make you want to challenge society.

The location matches the overall concept of the Persona series. Persona 5 takes place in Shibuya, Japan, a real place with buildings and subways to match. This is because the story is about the existence of a parallel world based on the occult and human emotion. While, Square Enix’s The World Ends with You (2007) also takes place in Shibuya, Persona 5 has the characters travelling in-and-out of the parallel world, or the Metaverse. Thus, the game feels more realistic due to the “parallel world” and “double life” storyline. The fact that Japanese towns and culture piques our interests!

Yes, it is an amazing JRPG and it deserved the win. However, the game was a contender for “Game of the Year.” It was well deserved, but Persona fans are not oblivious! We knew The Legend of Zelda: The Breath of the Wild was going to win that prize (and with good reason)! And yet, fans were pleased with the nomination because not only was it well-deserved, but also it brought the game series to the attention of mainstream gamers, especially those who neither heard of, nor played the series until now—I’m looking at you, Jirard “Dragonrider” Khalil a.k.a. “The Completionist”!!!

So, what makes Persona 5 stand out from other JRPGs and RPGs? First, it takes the concept from American comic super heroes and Japanese manga: you’re a student who is working to save the world! You play as a student who, along with his friends and classmates forms “The Phantom Thieves,” is protecting and saving the world from dark forces that inhabit both the real world and the paranormal world. Next, “the story” takes place over the course of a year. I believe the pacing in the game takes on an aspect of realism in that the objective cannot be met or completed in a short time. Last, children and adolescences are the main characters in this series. Not only does this fulfill the notion that “the younger generation” can make necessary changes within their society, but also the idea and the circumstances of social issues remain a constant throughout the series. Identity and the real world loom over adolescents because they are close to adulthood, and “how” the world views them affects and influences their personality. This is why the characters struggle with “who they are” throughout the game. However, in the narrative, we see the main characters dealing with their identities better than the “criminals.” It is fascinating to grasp on what motivates people to remove themselves from their negative identities.

The gameplay is a combination of turn-based strategy with some stealth. Grinding consists of completing side quests and building up bonds with confidants and personal social stats. Even what items you buy are part of your strategy throughout the game. Every confidant plays a role towards the ultimate goal of the game. The dungeons are artistic and narrative driven. Speaking of narrative, it seems more relevant with recent events. Children and adolescences are still people, and people can only take so much injustice and mistreatment.

Persona 5 is worth the 100+ hours of devoted gameplay, and the replay of “New Game Plus” for the “True Ending” reminds fans, and displays to newcomers how distinct the games in the Shin Megami Tensei series are within the video game industry. Granted, it takes true devotion in order to complete the Persona Compendium (Good Luck Jirard!), but seeing the numerous references to fantasy, folklore, the supernatural, the occult, the paranormal, and religion by ATLUS developers leaves us awestricken.

The numerous delays and the long hours of playing makes Persona 5 a worthwhile experience. I believe I can say—and many will agree—Persona 5 is a video game that ALL gamers need to play! The game radiates perfection in everything from style and music, to characters and story. While fans wait for an announcement for Persona 6, we will continue to play, and to enjoy, the games—and the spinoffs—of the Persona series!

Factions in Technology that Made a Difference: e-Readers and Self-Publishing Companies

            Last Christmas, I received an e-reader and I found myself to be both excited and anxious. I say this because I was happy someone (I won’t say who) knew me well enough as a reader to get me such a gift. At the same time, I was not sure what I would read that I did not already have in hardcopy. And yet, for sometime I was annoyed that some electronic books were cheaper than their other formats. Suddenly, I wanted to see what was available for me to read on my new e-reader.

            After purchasing some classics, some bestsellers, and some short stories (I really, really wanted to read Rick Riordan’s crossover tales), I went searching for novels available under $5 on Amazon and BarnesandNoble.com, and I was amazed at the selection. Of course, I already knew about “Smashwords” and “Draft2Digital,” but I never realized how many texts those sites made available for anyone who was interested in reading them. As many of you know, I enjoy reading fantasy, but some of what I started reading on my e-reader I probably would never have looked at once inside a bookstore. These writers were emerging as authors thanks to those self-publishing companies. A lot of their novels, which I bought and read, were creative and engaging with well-developed characters. Also, I was enjoying these stories to the point where I was staying up late reading chapter after chapter wanting to know what happens next.

            After I had read the fourth book in a series—within 3 days—I began to wonder if, whether or not, any of these authors would have had the chance to publish at all if it were not for the self-publishing companies. I am not saying that it is because of e-readers that such writers have had the chance to publish their works. Actually, e-readers have made reading more compatible and more accessible. It is due to these self-publishing companies online that we are able to read such stories. And, thanks to Amazon, iBooks, and BarnesandNoble.com, the ratings and the comments let others who are interested in the novels to be aware of whether or not each book was worth our time and our money. Seriously, what are the other publishing companies looking to publish? However, thinking back, none of the larger companies originally wanted to publish J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series. A smaller company decided to take a chance on the series (in the U.K.). Yes, there have been a few online authors—most notably Amanda Hocking—who eventually earned a publishing contract due to the success of their stories, but those are the large publishing companies who move to make these offers. Are any of the ‘independent’ publishers interested at all? These e-book writers should be admired for their determination and their productions (no, I am NOT an independent author, yet).

            I have always tried to read books from every genre of fiction, but now I am definitely paying more attention to what I read because my e-reader can only hold so many books. The authors I have been reading are some emerging fantasy and paranormal authors: Heather Killough-Walden, Lisa Kumar, B.C. Burgess, and James Maxwell (he is one of the rumored who is to receive a publisher’s contract). Some of the bestsellers I purchased at a reduced price include: Room, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, Plain Truth, Still Missing, and Looking for Alaska. Then there are the recommended books such as: Ready Player One, Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China, A Lesson Before Dying, and Kindred. I believe I am reading more across genres now than I was before I received my e-reader. However, I still have no interest in reading 50 Shades of Grey so do NOT ask me about it.

            Does this mean I am suggesting that everyone buy e-readers and/or we should pay more attention to what ‘everyday writers’ put out? —No, to the former, and yes, to the latter. When Winds of Winter and The Blood of Olympus are released, I plan on purchasing the hardcopy formats. Sometimes there is nothing like reading a (hardcopy formatted) book on your couch. Books cannot and should not fade out the way most newspapers and magazines have because of e-readers and the Internet. The emergence of popular print books by popular authors proves that as long as the books are good and contain what people want to read, there is no fear of either e-readers or independent authors. It is definitely more convenient to carry an e-reader, especially when one is traveling. Sometimes, it is better to travel lighter, but exceptions can always be made.

            Who, or what, do you read on your e-reader?