Why You Need to Read: “The Kingdom of Copper”

The Daevabad Trilogy #2: The Kingdom of Copper

By: S.A. Chakraborty

Published: February 21, 2019

Genre: Fantasy/Historical Fiction

            She shook her head. “Whatever the consequences, Dara acted to protect my daughter from a fate I fought for decades. I cannot fault him for that. And if you think Ghassan wasn’t looking for a reason to crack down on the Daevas the instant a Nahid and Afshin strolled through the gates of Daevabad, you clearly do not know him at all.” She gave them another sharp look. “Tearing each other apart is not why we are here,” (4, Dara). 

            As I mentioned in my review of The City of Brass, the first book in The Daevabad Trilogy, this is a series in which the characters and the world are influenced by Middle Eastern history, culture and folklore. Yet, the story of political power, corruption and struggle is a universal theme in stories and an issue within our world. The Kingdom of Copper expands both the influences and the themes in the magical world S.A. Chakraborty presents to us.

            The story takes place 5 years after Dara’s—short for Darayavahoush e-Afshin—death and resurrection, Nahri’s forced marriage to Prince Muntadhir, and Prince Alizayd’s—Muntadhir’s younger brother—exile to Am Gezira for plotting against his father, King Ghassan al Qahtani. Dara has been resurrected by Manizheh, Nahri’s mother—who faked her death in order to protect herself and her family—so that he can assist her in leading a rebellion against King Ghassan for his treachery and in order to reclaim the throne that was held by the Nahids—the ancestors and tribe of Nahri and Manizheh. Nahri is now wife to Muntadhir, the king’s son and heir, is the new Banu Nahid, or royal healer, and is trapped in the gilded cage of the palace with no one she can trust. She uses her healing gifts and her desire to be a physician in order to cope with her current scenario and unwanted status. Prince Ali has settled in a small community in an oasis in Am Gezira away from his father’s assassins and members of his mother’s family (who want him on the throne). During his exile he learns how to control the abilities gifted to him by the marid, water spirits, on the night he slew Dara. All three protagonists are in scenarios based on the poor choices they made 5 years ago. They all have to live with the consequences of their actions and find other methods to achieve their original goals. Dara, Nahri and Ali develop further into maturity and they must find a way to maneuver through the unrest between ruling classes and amongst the six tribes of the djinn. The complexity of their situations mirror the complexity of their characteristics. 

            The plot continues from where The City of Brass left off. King Ghassan continues to subdue his subjects—mostly the shafit (those of mixed human and djinn heritage)—to harsh treatment and brutal punishments for minor offenses. Ghassan believes with Ali exiled for his betrayal, the death of the last of the Afshins (a.k.a. Dara), and his dominance over Nahri and the supporters of the Nahids he’ll remain in control. However, the king’s enemies have learned how to work underground and soon of the king’s subjects will revolt against the descendants of the rebel who overthrew the Nahids from power. This plot was the subplot in the first book, and it proves how relevant it is to this story’s narrative. There are two main subplots. The first regards Dara and his failure to protect Nahri is the latest of his long list of failures. Due to his imprisonment before meeting Nahri, Dara hasn’t had time to deal with the consequences of his actions that led to the death of his family. Not to mention, Dara’s memories are becoming clearer and he’s starting to remember the events that led to his actions from centuries ago, and those memories are causing him to question whether or not his alliance with Manizheh will lead to similar consequences. The second subplot focuses on the concept of identity and what it means for both Nahri and Ali. Nahri knows she is descended from the Nahids, but she’s not sure what that means. She doesn’t trust anyone in Daevabad, so promises of better things to come by the priests and the other healers means nothing to her. At the same time, Nahri stumbles over information as to how and what her ancestors were really like during their reign in Daevabad and what the Daeva priests expect from her. Meanwhile, Ali learns that he has more abilities than the ones “gifted” to him by the marids. Once again, Ali must find a way to keep his family safe while protecting the denizens of Daevabad from his father’s tyranny. These subplots move along with the plot at an appropriate rate providing development of the plot and the characters, and a way to continue the world-building left off in the first book. 

            The narrative continues from the points-of-view of Dara, Nahri and Ali. Once again, the P.O.V.s are 3rd person limited narrative; meaning they know only what is happening around them at that moment, which means the narrative is told in real time. Readers are aware of each protagonist’s thoughts thanks to their stream-of-consciousness, and because there are moments when one protagonist knows more than the other two at random intervals. All three protagonists are reliable narrators and they provide readers with everything that is going on with all of the characters—including moments of foreshadowing—which, can be followed easily due to the narrative’s sequence.

            The style S.A. Chakraborty uses continues from The City of Brass to The Kingdom of Copper. The history and the folklore of the Middle East—during the Ottoman Rule—continues to influence the story, and the themes of tyrannical rule and rebellion and its endless cycle within the story. The mood in this book is one of tension brought on by corruption and mistreatment of people and the fighting amongst the tribes and the growth of that tension. The tone in this story is how someone should react when tensions are to the point where unrest is coming and how someone should prepare themselves for it regardless of how others want them to act. Trusting one’s instincts is the only way someone can hope to survive when unrest is inevitable. 

            The appeal towards The Kingdom of Copper buildup from the first book. Readers and critics alike praised the author for continuing her fantasy story using her method of storytelling, which led to compliments about the story’s structure by a few readers. Now that the stakes have been raised, fans can only hope for more from S.A. Chakraborty. The critical acclaim will keep the book in popularity and in the fantasy canon. And, fans will be eager to read the story’s conclusion in The Empire of Gold when it is released. 

             The Kingdom of Copper is a strong sequel in The Daevabad Trilogy. The pacing of the world-building and the conflicts go at a more appropriate rate this time, and the input of a realm’s forgotten history makes the story more realistic. The complexity of the characters make them all the more tragic, yet lovable. This novel makes the upcoming conclusion to this trilogy to be very promising. 

My Rating: Enjoy It (4.5 out of 5)!

Why You Need to Read…My Most Anticipated Speculative Fiction Books of 2020

2020 is coming and so are the books. Many of them are to be expected because they are follow-ups or sequels to previous books in a series. Others are either new or standalones books that have piqued our interests. Here is a short list of the books I’m excited to read in the new year (and, new decade). Note: if there is a book that is NOT listed here, then it is because either no release date has been announced, or I have not yet read the previous book(s) in that series. Also, keep in mind that intended release dates can change due to multiple reasons. This is based on the dates stated on the day this was posted. 

#1 The City We Became (The City #1) by N.K. Jemisin à March 26, 2020

            Many of us have been waiting for N.K. Jemisin to follow-up on her success of The Broken Earth Trilogy and we won’t have to wait much longer. This urban fantasy is a follow-up of the author’s short story, “The City Born Great,” and it appears to be an expansion of the “mythology” she mentioned in it. The focus is on New York City and its five protectors as they come together to protect the city from an ancient evil. As a New Yorker, I’m curious to see which aspects of City life the author decided to incorporate into her story. 

#2 The Network Effect (The Murderbot Diaries #5) by Martha Wells à May 5, 2020

            When it was announced that there would be a novel to continue The Murderbot Diaries series, I not only added the novel to my TBR list, but also made sure I was either able to claim an ARC of the book, or to preorder a copy of it! All we know of the plot so far is that Murderbot has to choose between saving his human friends and binge watching his favorite TV show. We already know what it’s going to do, and the story is going to be epic! I’m glad the author chose to continue this series!

#3 The Shadow Saint (The Black Iron Legacy #2) by Gareth Hanrahan à January 7, 2020

            This one shouldn’t surprise anyone. The Gutter Prayer was my favorite speculative fiction book of 2019, and the sequel, The Shadow Saint, has been on my TBR list since I started reading the first book in the series. The sequel takes place six months after the events in The Gutter Prayer. All we know is that the two warring factions—probably the ones from the first book—are competing against one another in search of a rumored weapon. It’s not clear whether or not any of the characters from the first book will appear in the second one, but if The Shadow Saint is anything like its predecessor, then we have nothing to worry about. 

#4 Daughter from the Dark by Marina & Sergey Dyachenko à February 11, 2020

            Vita Nostra was my favorite book of 2018, so you know I’m looking forward to reading this book by the husband and wife duo! This is a standalone novel is about a man who saves a 10-year-old girl from danger, who claims to be a music prodigy who is searching for her missing brother. Not sure whether or not the girl is a con artist, the man does everything he can in order to get the girl to leave, but every time he does, a “protector” thwarts him. All the while, darker forces threaten to separate the two before either of them can determine whether or not there’s a connection between them. 

#5 Ten Arrows of Iron (The Grave of Empires #2) by Sam Sykes à August 4, 2020

            Seven Blades in Black was my surprise read of 2019 and I’ve been anticipating the sequel since I finished it! Based on the synopsis, Sal is alone after the events of the previous book. However, she gains new purpose when she is asked to participate in a heist on the airship fleet, the Ten Arrows, in order to steal power for a mysterious patron. Things turn for the worse when Sal uncovers yet another conspiracy which may or may not with the death and the destruction of the world, again. If Ten Arrows of Iron is anything like its predecessor, then I already know it’s going to be fast-paced and full of action!   

#6 The Girl and the Stars (Book of the Ice #1) by Mark Lawrence à April 30, 2020

            The author is basing his new series in the same world as in the Book of the Ancestor Trilogy. Except now, readers will be transported to the Ice instead of a convent. Yaz is an ice triber who survives the harsh environment based on the ways of her people. However, she is separated from that life and everyone she knows and Yaz has to learn how to survive in a world she never knew existed. Fans and readers get to return to Abeth for a new story set in a world we only got a glimpse of before. 

#7 The Empire of Gold (The Daevabad Trilogy #3) by S.A. Chakraborty à June 30, 2020

            Daevabad has fallen to the rebels, unrest has erupted amongst the denizens, and magic has disappeared from the world. Meanwhile, both Nahri and Ali are safe in Cairo but decide to save their loved ones in the fallen kingdom. At the same time, Dara must confront his guilt while working alongside Banu Manizheh in order to bring some stability to the kingdom they’ve managed to overtake. The Empire of Gold is the final book in the author’s trilogy and we’re wondering who will survive the final fight for power within Daevabad. 

#8 The Burning God (The Poppy War #3) by R.F. Kuang à November 19, 2020

            There is no synopsis for this book, but here’s my hypothesis. The final book in The Poppy War Trilogy sees Rin struggling with the few friends she has left after more death and betrayal from both allies and enemies. However, she might have figure out the secret to the Empress’ power, but before she can do anything, she must face-off against the colonizers and those who betrayed her. 

#9 Legacy of Ash (Legacy Trilogy #1) by Matthew Wardà April 7, 2020 (Print)

            This debut novel focuses on three protagonists with different motivations must work together in order to save their country from a hostile empire. This is easier said than done, but are old hatreds and grudges worth it when their empire is about to fall to destruction? The eBook is available to purchase, but I know many are awaiting to read the printed format. 

#10 The Nine Realms by Sarah Kozloff à    

#1: A Queen in Hiding à January 21, 2020

#2: The Queen of Raiders à  February 18, 2020      

#3: A Broken Queen à  March 24, 2020

#4: The Cerulean Queen à   April 21, 2020

            Fantasy readers are in for a treat! The Nine Realms is a new series and both the author—who is making her debut—and the publisher—Tor Books—are releasing all four books within four consecutive months! Instead of waiting until after the author writes the next book in the series, each book will be released so that readers can enjoy the series—all 1,968+ pages of it—within a short time span. In other words, the time between each novel is more than enough time for readers to read and to process each one. The efforts of both the author and the publisher are appreciated immensely!

            The series is a fantasy bildungsroman and it follows Cérulia, Princess of Weirandale, who is starts off as an exiled and hunted orphan who is determined to do whatever it takes to reclaim the throne that is her birthright. Readers will get to experience the protagonist as she learns magic and how to fight; to participating in a battle against the invaders; to recovering from both visible and invisible scars caused by the war; to reclaiming her throne and establishing herself as a ruler and restoring order to the realm that was left in chaos. This journey sounds so promising that it’s no wonder the author and the publisher decided to release the books in consecutive months!  

#11 The Ranger of Marzanna (The Goddess War #1) by Jon Skovron à April 21, 2020

            Two siblings find themselves on opposing sides of allegiance to the Empire. After their father is murder by imperial soldiers, one will seek to destroy the Empire, while the other will strive to protect it. Sonya is a Ranger of Marzanna, an ancient sect of warriors and her brother, Sebastian, is the most powerful sorcerer in the world. What will happen when the siblings face-off against each other? 

#12 The Obsidian Tower (The Gate of Secrets #1) by Melissa Caruso à June 4, 2020

            The granddaughter of the ruler of a kingdom has broken magic. Although Ryx is mage-marked, all she can do is drain the life from everything she touches, making her place in society unstable. However, after she kills a visiting dignitary and activates a mysterious magical artifact, both by accident, she flees and meets up with a group of unlikely magical experts who are investigating the disturbances of the kingdom. Once, Ryx learns that her family is in danger, she risks everything to save them and to gain control of the same artifact she activated. The Obsidian Tower is the first book in a new series by the author of the Swords and Fire trilogy. 

#13 Call of the Bone Ships (The Tide Child Trilogy #2) by R.J. Barker à September 2020

            There is little to no information about this book and I had to confirm the rumored anticipated release date with the author. My hypothesis: the Tide Child continues its voyage into uncharted territory in order to determine whether or not the “sea dragons” are as endangered as everyone else believes them to be. At the same time, the crew must fend off any suspicious and curious ships whom decide to follow the path of their voyage. 

#14 The Fires of Vengeance (The Burning #2) by Evan Winter à July 16, 2020

            All that is known about this sequel to The Rage of Dragons is that it takes place after the events in the first book. I’m going to make a hypothesis and say that the story follows Tau as he continues his path towards vengeance for his father’s death and the betrayal of his warrior brothers. The Fires of Vengeance is a continuation of the war between two nations, but loyalties have altered since the end of Book One. 

#15 The Memory of Souls (A Chorus of Dragons #3) by Jenn Lyons à August 25, 2020

            I haven’t started to read The Name of All Things, the second book in A Chorus of Dragons Trilogy, but I know I’ll be done with it in time to read The Memory of Souls, the last book in the same trilogy. Kihrin has managed to convince everyone of the plans of his enemies to release the dark god, thus ending the world. There might be a way to prevent this from happening, but at the cost of all of the immortals. However, will Kihrin have to make the ultimate sacrifice in order to save the world? Is he willing to do that? 

#16 The Unspoken Name (The Serpent Gates #1) by A.K. Larkwood à February 11, 2020

            If you were supposed to die, but were then given the opportunity to live, then would you take it? Csorwe was supposed to be a sacrifice for the gods, but a mage gives him the chance to live, with some conditions. All he has to do is become a thief, train as a spy and an assassin, topple an empire and help the mage reclaim his seat of power. What’s the problem? Well, it turns out that Csorwe was supposed to be sacrificed for a reason; and the gods never forget. 

#17 The Wolf of Oren-Yaro (Chronicles of the Bitch Queen #1) by K.S. Villoso à February 18, 2020

            Queen Talyien was a hero of the War of the Wolves and set to marry the son of her father’s rival. Unfortunately, he vanishes before their reign can begin and the fragile peace crumbles. Years later, the Queen receives a message and she crosses the sea towards the meeting place. She survives an assassination attempt and now must find a way home while surviving through a hostile land. The Wolf of Oren-Yaro is the debut novel of a new epic fantasy series by this up-and-coming author. 

#18 The Protectorate #2 by Megan E. O’Keefe à August 18, 2020

            The sequel to Velocity Weapon takes place after the events in that novel. After the truth of Sanda’s imprisonment abroad Bero—whom escape from both Nazca and the Protectorate—she and Tomas flee before she can become a pawn of the greater powers. All they have are coordinates to a dead gate with no way to survive there. Unsure of what to do, Sanda and Tomas might have to plead to the only group willing to assist them, Nazca.

#19 Docile by K.M. Szpara à March 3, 2020

            Dociline is a drug. It is given to Dociles when they serve out their contracts of servitude to those who own them. However, there are negative side effects to this drug and for some reason only Elisha is willing to avoid the drug. When his contract of servitude is purchased by the family of the creators of the drug, Elisha refuses to take it. This puts him at odds against Alexander Bishop III, who believes he can turn Elisha into a Docile without the drug. This story is a parable about sex, love, corruption and capitalism.  

#20 Strange Exit by Parker Peevyhouse à January 14, 2020

            Lake, the seventeen-year-old protagonist in this story, seems to be the only one who knows that the world she and everyone is living in is in fact a simulation. For some unknown reason, after a nuclear event everyone’s bodies have remained in stasis and their minds are trapped within a shared virtual reality all aboard a spaceship. The only way to get off the ship is to remind all of the passengers that they are living in a virtual reality. Lake is accompanied by Taren, but he doesn’t share the same views about saving everyone as she does and soon they are both of them are in a race to locate the heart of the simulation so that everyone can get off the ship dead or alive. 

Additional Books to Lookout For:

Come Tumbling Down (Wayward Children #5) by Seanan McGuire à January 7, 2020

Stormsong (The Kingston Cycle #2) by C.L. Polk à February 11, 2020

The Killing Fog (The Grave Kingdom #1) by Jeff Wheeler à March 1, 2020

Race the Sands: A Novel by Sarah Beth Durst à April 21, 2020

Aurora Burning (The Aurora Cycle #2) by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff à May 5, 2020

The Only Good Indians by Stephen Graham Jones à May 19, 2020

The Order of the Pure Moon Reflected in Water by Zen Cho à June 23, 2020

Ashes of the Sun (Burningblade & Silvereye #1) by Django Wexler à July 21, 2020

The Invisible Life of Addie La Rue by V.E. Schwab à October 6, 2020

Between Earth and Sky (Anasazi Series #1) by Rebecca Roanhorse à TBA 2020

            These are some of the many books I plan to read in 2020. There are so many other books to expect—some to be released in 2020 and others beyond 2020—but, these are the ones I’m going to start reading, immediately. As for the obvious anticipated books that were not listed here, don’t worry I plan on making my way through the previous books in those series so that I can read the follow-ups as soon as they are released. Which books are you excited for the most in 2020 Are there any other buzzworthy books to lookout for? 

Why You Need to Read: “Darkdawn”

The Nevernight Chronicle: #3: Darkdawn

By: Jay Kristoff

Published: September 3, 2019

Genre: Fantasy, Grimdark, Historical Fantasy, Folklore

NOTE: This review contains spoilers from both Nevernight and Godsgrave.

            Goddess, if only we’d known what she’d become…(Chapter 33, Wellspring). 

            Darkdawn is the stunning conclusion to The Nevernight Chronicle. Jay Kristoff gives his readers a blood-soaked conclusion to his antiheroine that rivals “The Bride” from Kill Bill and Kratos from God of War. Mia Corvere and her vengeance concludes in Darkdawn, and the author delivers on everything he promised his readers and gives them even more.

            Mia Corvere has transformed from an assassin of the Red Church to a gladiator of the Falcons of Remus to the most infamous murderer in the Itreyan Republic. While she was killing her family’s enemies, she made a startling discovery and acted without thinking. Her brother, Jonnen, has been alive the entire time and has been raised as Consul Julius Scaeva’s son. More about Scaeva’s deception is revealed to Mia and she realizes that her identity was a lie as well. As she comes to terms with this new information, Mia learns that she has been chosen to “seek the Crown of the Moon.” It turns out the gods and the goddesses of the Itreyan Republic are as real as the magic in that world. Mia’s power of a darkin is strongest during Nevernight—which, is coming again soon—and, when the Mother Goddess—Niah, the Maw, the Mother of Night, and Our Lady of Blessed Murder—is strong enough to get her vengeance on Aa—the Father of Light, the Everseeing—her husband. Mia is powerful enough to assist the Maw with her path for revenge. However, Mia has accomplished her tasks and wishes to put as much distance between herself and the Itreyan Republic as possible. But first, Mia has to complete purging the Red Church who has sent ALL of their assassins after her. Meanwhile, Mercurio—Mia’s mentor and foster father—is a captive in the Red Church to use as bait to lure Mia Corvere to them. At the same time, Mercurio learns of the role he’s to play in the Mother’s plan, and it’s as shocking to the readers as it is to him! Throughout the story, we see Mia being split between keeping her brother and her friends safe and killing Consul Scaeva once and for all and following the path the Mother has laid before her. Mia deals with all of these revelations the only way an 18-year-old can…by lashing out; and, Mia’s method of lashing out involves killing a lot of people. Mia is now the most lethal assassin in the history of the Itreyan Republic and the true faith of the Maw expects Mia to fulfill her final task. Will Mia accept the task of the Mother? 

            The plot in Darkdawn is the conclusion to Mia’s life. Readers have known since Nevernight that Mia Corvere would die. The question was how and why. Mia’s quest for revenge now includes the Red Church and anyone Consul Scaeva sends after her. On top of that the Mother (darkness) and the Father (sunlight) are preparing to meet each other and to end their “spousal disagreement.” Mia has to battle gods and goddesses at the same time she is battling mortals. The plot develops as Mia and Mercurio learn more about the history of the Red Church and the darkin. As for the history of the gods and the goddesses, all of those footnotes throughout the trilogy was information as to what would occur eventually. The immortals—like all mythologies—have foresaw their Ragnarök and Mia is to play a very critical role in the end of the Itreyan Republic. Will the gods allow Mia to defeat them? Along with this subplot is the subplot of Mia’s reunion with Jonnen and the relationship she struggles to build with him. These subplots are crucial to the conclusion of The Nevernight Chronicle and they take over the plot of Darkdawn as the story continues. The plot starts with and ends with Mia Corvere. 

            The narrative in Darkdawn is a continuation of Nevernight and Godsgrave until the final part of Darkdawn (Book 4, The Ashes of Empires). From there, the story seems to follow a stream-of-consciousness in the present tense, until it shifts back to the 3rd limited point-of-view. This narration allows readers to follow the actions of Mia, Ashlinn, Jonnen, Mercurio, and other characters as all is revealed throughout the Itreyan Republic. Mia—even with her darkin abilities—cannot be everywhere at once, so readers get the chance to learn how all of these characters are feeling with their situation and what will come to pass. While readers might not like certain characters, their narratives are objective and essential to the story that is being told. The footnotes remain informative and hilarious but are just as vital to the story as the world-building. Everything converges within the narrative. 

            The style Jay Kristoff uses continues in the final book in this trilogy. The events of the past are told in italics, the darkin’s dialogue are told using various font sizes, and the footnotes continue to explain Itreya’s history and culture. That last part is crucial to the narrative because it can be argued that the history and the culture was the real story being told in The Nevernight Chronicle. For example, the “author” of the entire chronicle is revealed, and once readers get over their shock, they will realize that it makes a lot of sense. On top of that readers are reminded that books still enact a sense of fear whether or not it’s the reader or the people mentioned within it. Jay Kristoff reveals the actual story he is telling in his trilogy, the anger of a goddess and the revenge she is waiting to enact on her husband. Similar to how Mia wants vengeance for her family, Niah wants revenge against Aa. The clues were in the titles: Nevernight, Godsgrave, and Darkdawn. The author wasn’t only telling Mia’s story, but also creating his own mythology about the world he created: the gods and the goddesses, how they created the world, and the religion that came out of it as well. The mood in Darkdawn is the coming end of an empire, a cult and its followers, and the protagonist. Readers are familiar with the saying, “tear it all down and begin anew.” Usually this statement comes out of the mouth of a madman; however, in the case of the Itreyan Republic—similar to the Roman Empire—there is so much corruption and greed that the end was going to happen sooner or later (I’m not a historian). The tone of this novel follows the idiom: “the sins of the father shall be visited upon the sons.” The actions of Mia and Jonnen’s parents are reaped by the siblings. At the same time, the actions of the gods affect the mortals who worship them. And yet, the same emotions are felt by mortals and by immortals alike. 

            The appeal surrounding Darkdawn will be a positive one. I received an ARC of this book and Jay Kristoff gives a satisfying ending to this creative and bloody trilogy. Fans of fantasy and grimdark will enjoy this story. Readers of historical fiction will appreciate the parallels (and the research) to the Roman Empire. And, folklore enthusiasts and experts will love how the author reminds his audience of the source of magic and faith found throughout the trilogy. Darkdawn concludes the way it does as mentioned in the beginning of Nevernight.

            Darkdawn is the action-driven end to a fast-paced trilogy. Mia Corvere’s life story ends as it began, with blood and death. Readers will cringe at the death count, will mourn the characters who die, and won’t be able to stop reading until the end. Fans will complete The Nevernight Chronicle and be more than satisfied with its conclusion. Mia Corvere is one of the best antiheroines I’ve ever read. Thank you Jay Kristoff for sharing her story with us! 

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!!!

Why You Need to Read: “Grey Sister”

Book of the Ancestor: Book Two: Grey Sister

By: Mark Lawrence

Published: April 3, 2018

Genre: Fantasy, Grimdark, Sequel

            “You’re powerful Nona, and you’ve come into your power at an early age. The understanding that power corrupts is an idea older than the language we repeat it in. All of us in positions that afford authority over others are susceptible, be we high priests, prime instigators, even abbesses.”

            “Or emperors,” Nona said.

            The abbess winced. “Some truths are better left implied, dear,” (Chapter 17).

            Sequels and other follow ups to their predecessors work well when the events that occurred beforehand are addressed AND the action picks up where it left off. In addition, both the plot development and the character development must continue to show growth in order for the story to remain realistic, and to keep the attention of the reader(s). Mark Lawrence achieves all of this in Grey Sister, the Second Book of the Ancestor.

            The second book in the trilogy has two protagonists: Nona Grey, who is now around 14 years-old and just reached Mystic Class; and Abbess Glass, the Reverend Mother and Headmistress at the Convent of Sweet Mercy. From these protagonists, readers are able to gain knowledge of the on goings of everything happening at the Convent. Nona is coming into her powers and her abilities and is dealing with the consequences of her actions from her time in Grey Class. At the same time, Abbess Glass continues her task of running the Convent and continuing her task of exposing corruption inside and outside of the Convent. More is at stake for both female protagonists as both the Emperor and the Inquisition continue to meddle in the affairs of the Church. All of the other novices: Ara, Darla, Ruli, Jula, and Zole, and the nuns: Wheel, Apple, Kettle, Pan, Rose, Tallow, and Rail know that more is happening outside of the Convent than the Emperor is willing to admit. And, once again, Nona meets up with a few of her former “cage mates,” who have grown into their abilities as well. Everyone is preparing for a war that is inevitable. Nona must endure the obstacles and the hardships in order to graduate from Mystic Class. Abbess Glass must use all of her wisdom and her connections to keep everyone safe, including the “Chosen One” and her “Shield.”

            The plot for Grey Sister is a continuation from Red Sister. Nona and her friends and classmates continue with their classes and the nuns continue their work inside and outside of the Convent. All of this occurs after the betrayals and the heartbreaks from the last two years. These events prompt the identity of the “Chosen One” to be revealed, which brings a motley crowd of zealots and doubters alike. At the same time, neither the noble families, nor the nuns have forgotten the efforts of one noble family’s continued plans to kill Nona. Nona is struggling with her classes due to the long-term “consequence” of the attack on her life. Through it all, Nona grows stronger and more powerful to the delight of her peers and to the horror of her enemies. If Nona wishes to remain at the Convent of Sweet Mercy and to stay alive, then she must find a way to navigate herself through her trials. The subplot of the “Chosen One” is growing and merging into the plot of Nona’s education and the significance of the 4 tribes that traveled to Abeth.

            Once again, the narrative is limited omniscient narration, meaning the readers and the protagonists know what is being experienced at that moment through the character’s point-of-view. Unlike Red Sister, the narrative in Grey Sister is told in real-time through the P.O.V.s of both Nona and Abbess Glass. Thus, these stream-of-consciousness narrations are reliable and can be followed by readers easily. It should be mentioned that the present narration of Grey Sister starts with Chapter 2. Chapter 1 picks up with the cliffhanger from Red Sister, and the Prologue provides a continuation of the action first introduced in the Prologue in Red Sister. Since Grey Sister’s narration is told in the present, any events of the past that is mentioned proves to be a revelation to both the characters and the readers. This is because what gets revealed demonstrates that everything that is, has been, and will continue to happen is bigger and more grievous than anyone at the Convent of Sweet Mercy could imagine. 

            The style Mark Lawrence uses in Grey Sister is a continuation of how prophecy is exploited through means of distraction. Those involved directly with the prophecy want nothing more than to be left alone and to live their lives as “normal” individuals. Some hopefuls wish for the “divine” powers of the “Chosen One” to work miracles for them only to be left disappointed with this notion. Then, there are those who use the prophecy as a way to fulfill their agendas, typically political ones. And, if the prophecy of the “Chosen One” is a distraction, then the political agendas of several noble families, including the Royal Family, serves as the knowledge that no one wants to admit is the issue: war is coming. In other words, religion is exploited in order to distract everyone from the politics of society. This is the mood found within Grey Sister; and, the tone is how the truth—surrounding both religion and politics—is revealed and the reactions and the consequences of it. There are neither winners, nor losers, yet everyone continues to believe whatever they want to believe in. 

            The appeal of Grey Sister is as positive as Red Sister. Fans of the first book had just as many praises for its sequel. This is because the sequel continues to build and to develop the characters, the plot, the world-building, and the action. Not only will readers want to re-read this book (to search for clues and Easter Eggs), but also to continue recommending this series to other readers, all while waiting to read Holy Sister, the third and final book in the series. 

            Grey Sister is an amazing sequel to Red Sister. This is because there is an expansion of the world and further development of both the plot and the characters. At the same time, the events and the revelations from the first book play a critical role that cannot be overlooked. The story is as immersive as the action is entertaining. Mark Lawrence’s novel is a must-read for fans of both fantasy and grimdark.

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!

Why You Need to Read: “Godsgrave”

The Nevernight Chronicle: Book Two: Godsgrave

By: Jay Kristoff

Published: September 5, 2017

Genre: Fantasy, Grimdark, Historical Fiction

            Ashlinn sighed, her temper fraying. “You have no fucking idea what’s going on here, do you? I know you, Mia. Do you have any idea what the Red Church actually is? Do you think they’re ever going to let you kill Scaeva when he pays their wages?”

            Mia felt the consul’s name like a fist in her belly. 

            “You’re full of shit.”

            “Why do you think Scaeva isn’t dead already?”(Chapter 10, Secrets). 

            Godsgrave—the follow up to Nevernight—is an action-packed fantasy story from beginning to end. Conspiracies are uncovered and secrets are revealed, and characters grow more into themselves. Mia Corvere’s quest for revenge continues when she learns more about the Red Church and the politics of The Republic of Itreya. Jay Kristoff not only delivers an amazing sequel to his readers, but also gives us his take on the Gladiator Games, which are based on the ones from Ancient Rome. 

            Mia Corvere is now a Blade—an assassin—for the Red Church. Thus, she is closer to achieving her quest for vengeance; or, she would be if she hadn’t uncovered a conspiracy within the Red Church that includes her family. Curious to learn more about this connection, she goes undercover by selling herself to one of the noble families—similar to the one she grew up in—as a gladiator. Mia not only has to survive and to learn how to fight within these games, but also must navigate her way into the inner circle of the elite. Mia makes new allies, works with her darkin (shadow) companions, and works with a frenemy. Mia realizes that if she had continued living the life as a Justicus’ daughter it would not have equated to a happy life. At the same time, she learns more about why her parents rebelled against The Republic of Itreya. All the while, Mia learns how to fight as a gladiator, which is its own style and not like how she learned to fight at the Red Church. This is Mia’s coming-of-age story in which she sees everything for what it actually is and how to adapt to this new knowledge, just like everyone else goes through while growing up. Mia and all of the characters she interacts with are as complex as her. 

            The plot is straightforward; Mia continues her path to avenge her family. She’s closer to that goal now she’s a Blade for the Red Church. However, when she’s told not to pursue her target, Mia begins to question the operations within the order. Mia decides to go rogue and to continue her quest by selling herself as a slave to a gladiatorial collegium in order to get closer to Consul Scaeva. There she learns how to fight as a gladiator and how deep conspiracies run. The subplot is Mia learning the hows and the whys of her government and the roles her parents had in it before the rebellion. Both the plot and the subplot are linked in that Mia learns some hard truths about the life she thought she had and lived. This turn of events could alter the way Mia carries out the rest of her plans.

            The narrative in Godsgrave continues from what it was in Nevernight. The events of the past lead up to the events in the present. The difference here is that the narration is in the 3rdperson omniscient point-of-view. Readers want to know what is happening with the other characters when Mia is not around, and the author gives that to us with that method of narration. The world-building continues in the second book through the footnotes, which remain informative and hilarious. Jay Kristoff’s world continues to grow through his narration. 

            The style continues as it started in the first book. Remember, this story is supposed to be one huge chronicle, so the style won’t change, which is a good thing because changing the style would change the way the story is being told and we don’t want that to happen. So, the events of the past are written in italics, the darkins’ dialogue are told using smaller font sizes, and the footnotes continue to explain Iterya’s history and culture. The mood, once again, lets readers know that this world is not a caring one; even the elite mistreat each other. The tone illustrates how an individual could react to such mistreatment; and, it is not good. 

            Godsgrave is the follow up that fans and readers crave for from a sequel. The appeal surrounds how the story and the plot develop through character growth and world expansion. Jay Kristoff succeeds in providing a perfect continuation of this trilogy. It’s safe to assume the same will happen in Darkdawn, the final book in the trilogy. 

            Godsgrave is the perfect transition from Nevernight to the point where you forget that you’re reading two separate books. The theme of doing the wrong thing for the right reason continues in this narrative and in many of the characters. Fans will not be disappointed with this sequel! Mia Corvere’s journey continues to grasp our attention!

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!!!

Why You Need to Read: “The City of Brass”

The Daevabad Trilogy: Book 1: The City of Brass

By: S.A. Chakraborty

Published: November 14, 2017

Genre: Fantasy/Historical Fiction

            “Nahri had spent her entire life trying to blend in with those around her just to survive. Those instincts were warring even now: her thrill at learning what she was and her urge to flee back to the life she’d worked so hard to establish for her Cairo,”(Chapter 3). 

            I read S.A. Chakraborty’s first novel, The City of Brass, after its sequel, The Kingdom of Copper, was released in January 2019. The good news is that I enjoyed this novel, and the better news is I don’t have to wait to read the second book! This is a magical story that starts in Egypt and travels to a hidden kingdom in the Middle East.

            Nahri is a con woman with a magical intuition who is surviving on the streets of Cairo during its occupation of the Ottoman Empire. Hoping to become a trained healer, Nahri takes jobs “healing customers” while conning them. However, during one of her jobs, Nahri not only reveals her magical aptitude to herself, but also summons a djinn warrior named Dara, who whisks her out of Egypt to the kingdom of Daevastana, where she’ll be safe from enemies, or so they both believe. Meanwhile, Prince Alizayd al Qahtani of Daevastana is scheming behind his father’s back by aiding the poor Shafits, whom are being harmed and mistreated throughout the kingdom. Ali’s intentions are good, but he is naïve both in royal politics and in the truth surrounding the anger of the indentured population. When Nahri and Dara arrive in Daevabad, Ali must quash his ambitions in order to protect his family. Both Nahri and Ali must learn how to navigate and to cope with both their identities and their responsibilities to themselves and to those who rely on them—Nahri to the Daeva and Ali to his family. In the middle of all the impending drama is Dara—short for Darayavahoush e-Afshin—who has an interesting history with both Nahri’s and Ali’s ancestors. 

            The plot is about power, both political and magical. Nahri goes from being a thief to becoming the Royal Healer and the Last Nahid, and Prince Ali—the Qaid, or Head of the Guard for the Royal Family—must choose between doing what is right or being loyal to his family. Both protagonists are trying to determine whether or not Dara has ulterior motives and whether or not he is in control of his magical powers. The subplot, which will most likely become the plot later on in the trilogy, is the tension building within the six tribes residing in the kingdom. More is happening than either Nahri, or Prince Ali realize, but they can only do so much to keep a war from breaking out. Yet, there are more forces at work, which are revealed as the story continues. It goes slow at times, but both the plot and the subplot fall together by the novel’s end. 

            The narratives are told from the point-of-views of both Nahri and Ali; but, they are told in the third person limited narrative. Everything is told in real time, which makes the world-building and the plot easy to follow. Both Nahri and Ali are reliable narrators because readers learn of their flaws and the mistakes they make as the story continues onward. These flaws and mistakes are pointed out to them by the other characters, constantly, which could be argued to be an element of foreshadowing.

            The author’s style of writing can be presented in the mood, in which the beauty of the Middle Eastern region covers up the harsh realities of the people who reside there. Nahri swindles the wealthy residents in Cairo, which is moving between the Ottoman Turks. Ali is the Second Prince who hopes his brother’s reign will be better than their father’s corrupt one. Chakraborty’s tone reminds readers that the settings within the novel are in the midst of an occupation by those who don’t belong there: The Ottoman Turks in Cairo, and the Geziri tribe’s (Prince Ali’s family) rule of the Qahtani throne, which was once occupied by the Nahid (Nahri’s) family. The inclusion of Middle Eastern history and folklore flow within the story in order to add to the richness of this fantasy novel. The Glossary at the back of the book and the map at the front of the book allows for readers to keep track of the characters, the locations, and the culture with ease. Chakraborty’s style allows readers to have a flowing and an informative look into her world. 

            The appeal surrounding The City of Brasshas been a positive one for the Science Fiction Fantasy community; and it is a great addition to the sub-genre that is Middle Eastern fantasy. Both the novel and Chakraborty have been nominated for numerous awards such as the Locus, the British Fantasy, the World Fantasy, and the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer. The second book in the trilogy, The Kingdom of Copper, has received praise from readers and critics alike. As far as I know, the second book picks up where the first one left off. Hopefully, the third and final book, The Empire of Gold, gives us everything we want.

            The City of Brassis a fantasy novel that gives Western readers a story that could have occurred during the Ottoman Rule of the Middle East with the culture and the myths that go with it. While the narrative was smooth, the characters believable, the world-building and the conflicts take a bit longer to develop than I prefer. The “revelation” towards the end of the novel came a bit too late, but it works with the narrative and makes you want to read the next book in the trilogy, which I plan on doing. Chakraborty is a speculative fiction writer whose novels should not be missed by readers of the genre.

My rating: Enjoy It! (4 out of 5) 

Why You Need to Read: These Books While Waiting for “The Winds of Winter”

Many readers recall waiting for the next book in a series whether or not it is a novel, a graphic novel, or a novella. Harry Potter usually comes to mind due to the phenomenon experienced throughout the 2000s, but there are other series that fans wait for with anticipation, patiently. George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire is one of those series. Due to the success of the show, Game of Thrones, the number of readers has increased, significantly. Unfortunately for Martin, this means that the pressure is mounting and readers have become more demanding for the next book in the series, The Winds of Winter. The fifth book, A Dance with Dragons, was released in 2011; and, with the television adaptation ending in 2019; the hype surrounding the next book continues to grow.

So, what do readers who are waiting for a book do? Simple, we read other books from either his or her contemporaries, or recommendations from friends or other fans. I’ll be listing suggested books and series you should read while waiting for The Winds of Winter. There are plenty of books to read, but which ones should you read? Besides books by Tolkien, Lewis, L’Engle, King, Jordan, Sanderson, Rowling, Herbert and Baum, there are so many books under the speculative fiction and magic realism genres for us to enjoy. And, readers can read these books and learn for themselves why these other books are just as essential to read as those written by the authors mentioned earlier.

This list is NOT my “favorites” because that list changes all the time. In addition, I will be including books in which I’ve finished reading. So, if there is a book that is NOT listed in this list, then it means either I have not yet read it, or I’m currently reading it and have not finished it. Also, I’m not including novellas or short stories here because that is a list for another time. This list contains suggestions I give to many people who know about my enthusiasm for reading, and are listed in no particular order. These books are available in print, in eBook, or at your local library.

Honorable Mentions

The Bear and the Nightingale (2017) by Katherine Arden

This is Katherine Arden’s debut novel, which is a blend of fantasy, folklore, and magic realism of the Russian culture. The novel is a retelling of the story of “Vasilisa the Beautiful,” which I’m learning more about while reading through the series. The novel, the first in a trilogy, follows Vasya, from her birth and early childhood to her adolescent years. Readers learn about Vasya’s family, culture, magic, and changes in her society—particularly Russia’s conversion to Christianity—during the mid-14th century. I recommend this book for fans of fairy tales, Russian history, and Slavic mythology.

Alanna: The First Adventure (1983) by Tamora Pierce

This is Tamora Pierce’s first novel, which is set in her world of Tortall. Alanna and her twin brother, Thom, switch places for their schooling. Thom goes to magic school to become a mage and Alanna goes to begin her training to become Tortall’s first female knight in 400 years. In order to accomplish this, Alanna has to disguise herself as a male. This novel provides readers with Alanna’s schooling, training, and developing into a woman (which she has to find ways to conceal). In addition, readers will learn about Tortall, which the author has spent the past 35 years building, creating, and expanding. There are several other books that occur in Tortall, with its own history and timeline.

Monstress, Vol. 1: Awakening (2016) by Marjorie M. Liu & Sana Takeda (Artist)

Told by Marjorie M. Liu and illustrated by Sana Takeda, this volume contains issues #1-6. This graphic novel follows Maika Halfwolf, a 17 year-old survivor of a war between humans and magical beings known as Arcanics. Maika is suffering from both amnesia and PTSD from the war and her mother’s “research” that may or may not be responsible for her powers, and her blackouts. This beautifully illustrated steampunk horror story is a hybrid of Eastern and Western storytelling, supernatural elements, and art style.

Brave Story (1987) by Miyuki Miyabe

I’ll risk the criticism and call this novel the “first LitRPG”! This entwicklungsroman novel is from Japan and it follows Wataru Mitani, a young boy who goes on a magical quest in order to change his fate. However, he has to complete the quest before his classmate, Mitsuru Ashikawa, beats him to it. Similar to a RPG, Wataru travels to another world, meets companions, fights monsters in order to reach the end of the journey for the ultimate showdown. This fantasy novel includes social and familial issues children deal with on a regular basis, which makes it more enjoyable for fans of low fantasy.

Haroun and the Sea of Stories (1990) by Salman Rushdie

This novel is the first in a series by award-winning author, Salman Rushdie. When Haroun’s father loses his ability to tell stories, which is his profession, Haroun travels to the place where his father gets his stories, only to learn that the entire kingdom is in distress. Haroun is both the protagonist and the witness to the events within this novel. Salman Rushdie plays with everyone’s notions surrounding fairy tales, fantasy worlds, and magic.

1) The Harbinger Series: Storm Glass (2018) by Jeff Wheeler

The most recent book on this list is by Jeff Wheeler, an underground fantasy author who is very popular amongst the Kindle Unlimited subscribers. He has several fantasy books in multiple series that are interconnected. The Harbinger Series is Wheeler’s latest series and Storm Glass is the first book. If you’re new to Jeff Wheeler, then he recommends that you read this series before reading his other ones.

Storm Glass is told from the point-of-views of two 12 year-old girls from different backgrounds. Cettie is an orphan living in a foster home in the worst district in the city, until a wealthy politician and his family take her in. Sera is a princess who is living a sheltered, but unhappy life above the clouds. Both girls start to change their destinies against a rigid society that attempts to halt them over and over again. The girls realize quickly that their individual lives were never the most complex ones. Each social class has its own dilemmas.

Fans of A Song of Ice and Fire will appreciate the political discussions, the world building, and the complexity of all the characters. The fact that two 12 year-olds are faced with these adult issues and challenges reminds us that children are pawns in the struggle for power, too. The first book ends with a subtle cliffhanger, but fans and readers will remember that power is a continuous affair.

2) Vicious: Villains: Book 1 (2013) by V.E. Schwab

This unique and immersive story is Schwab’s first adult novel. The following influences the story: X-Men, Frankenstein, and The Count of Monte Cristo, toxic families, and toxic masculinity. Told in a narrative that alters between the past and the present, the author builds up a plan of revenge through the points of view of all of the characters, most of who have Extra Ordinary abilities gained from near death experiences.

Victor Vale and Eli Ever will remind readers of pairings such as Professor X and Magneto, Batman and the Joker, and The Punisher and Daredevil. Victor and Eli met and became frienemies at college. When the two decide to experiment with the ideas surrounding EOs for an assignment, both men gain very different abilities at great costs. 10 years later, both men are at opposite ends of the same side, the bad side. Readers learn everything that has happened to both Victor and Eli throughout that time period as well as what is supposed to happen when the two men meet up again. And, it’s everything and nothing you’d expect!

Readers of A Song of Ice and Fire should keep in mind that Victor Vale and Eli Ever could be compared to Varys and Littlefinger (you decide who is who). The cunning of these males are obvious and their traumas are relatable, yet the readers wonder if the ends justify the means. And just like A Dance with Dragons, only the sequels will give readers a closer look into these men. Vengeful is out now for those who crave more from these toxic males, and the author.

3) The Sandman Volume 1: Preludes & Nocturnes (1989) by Neil Gaiman, Sam Kieth   (Illus.), Mike Dringenberg (Illus.), Jill Thompson (Illus.), Shawn McManus (Illus.), Marc Hempel (Illus.), Michael Zulli (Illus.), Dave McKean (Illus.), and many other illustrators

Just about everyone has heard about this graphic novel series. But, how many people have actually read this series? This story follows Dream, a male who controls every aspect of dreams, as he does his “job” while interacting with various people and beings in the past and in the present. Each of the 10 issues illustrates Dream as he performs his “job” and displays his importance to humanity. The story is told by Neil Gaiman and is illustrated by a slew of talented artists.

Now available in a new printed edition, The Sandman Vol. 1 follows Dream as he is captured and released from a magical prison. Throughout this volume, readers learn of the severe consequences humanity suffers due to The Sandman’s imprisonment. Then, readers see how Dream deals and works through the damage control surrounding those affected by Dream’s absence. Dream even makes a journey to Hell.

Fans of George R.R. Martin will appreciate how Gaiman tells both the story and the consequences of humans messing around with “higher powers” and “the unknown.” If you decide to continue reading this series, then you will notice similarities found in the world building of the supernatural and the magic. The figures behind such powers will have readers wondering whether or not they should get involved with such things.

4) Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightning Thief (2005) by Rick Riordan

While many of us have heard of this popular series, how many have actual read the books, especially the first one? Rick Riordan writes a combination of “What if…” and “mundane/within our world” fantasy with modern-day children. The ancient gods still live, and they now reside in the United States. Percy Jackson is 12 year-olds, never met his father, hates his stepfather, suffers from dyslexia and ADHD, and gets expelled from school every year. Suddenly, he’s accused of stealing from Zeus, the King of the Greek Gods, and has to travel cross-country to prove his innocence. Think of it as Neil Gaiman’s American Gods, but for younger readers.

This book, the series, the sequel series, and the spinoffs should be read because of the references to the myths, the cultures, and the histories mentioned throughout the series. Myths are religious beliefs and customs followed by groups of people. Religion is the forefront of myths because people pray and worship their god(s) or goddess(es). History is a chronological list of events of the past, which allow for current generations to look at both the hindsight and the repercussions of those events. In addition, legends and heroes are added to the tales within the cultures’ mythology. Sound familiar?

George R.R. Martin’s influences come from ancient and modern mythologies and legends: Norse, Greek, Arthurian, Christianity, etc. Why not read a popular series that explains these influences? Riordan has written series about the Greek and the Roman, the Egyptian, and the Norse myths. Plus, he supports and recommends similar series about other world mythologies such as those written by Roshani Chokshi, Nnedi Okorafor, and Jonathan W. Stokes.

5) Battle Royale: The Novel (1999) by Koushun Takami

This novel gets lost between Lord of the Flies and The Hunger Games. And, since both novels are required reading in school, why not pick up another book about a dystopian society in which children are forced to kill each other? This import from Japan is an updated version of William Golding’s text, but with the emotional brutality of Suzanne Collin’s trilogy.

After being abducted and forced to compete in “the most dangerous game,” 42 15 year-old Japanese students make the choice on whether or not to participate. The chapters are told from the point-of-view of several of the characters, thus having the readers realize why certain students are the way they are. This setup of the characters’ past is similar to A Song of Ice and Fire.

Just like in George R.R. Martin’s series, readers get into the heads of the teenagers in Battle Royale, and they decide on whether or not to emphasize with them. Even though the setting is dystopian, the issues and the experiences of the students are current and real. Yet, it is understandable if a reader wishes to continue disliking a character because he or she believes that someone’s past and previous experiences does NOT justify that character’s actions. Not to mention, the pacing is appropriate and believable and matches the mood of the book.

6) Uprooted (2015) by Naomi Novik

Naomi Novik has been writing and publishing books for over ten years with her Temeraireseries. Yet, she has expanded her fan base due to her latest books, which focuses on what societies know about heroes, legends, magic, and fairy tales and adds the element of realism to them. Uprooted is one of Novik’s novels that follow this method of storytelling.

Loosely based on Beauty and the Beast, Agnieszka is chosen to serve a wizard known as “The Dragon” as a form of compensation for him protecting her village from “The Corrupted Wood.” Agnieszka must serve The Dragon for ten years by assisting him with reducing the power of The Wood. During her service, she learns how to use magic, how to make her way in the royal court, and how to live with the consequences that is her magic.

This novel is similar to George R.R. Martin’s series in that heroes are not always heroic, nature can be dangerous, magic comes at a cost, and power writes history. “Magic has a cost” is the central theme in this novel, just like in A Song of Ice and Fire. Also, the characters question the motives of the trees within the forest: The Wood and The Old Gods. Are there more to them than the characters and the readers realize?

7) Who Fears Death (2007) by Nnedi Okorafor

Fans of the Binti trilogy and the Akata series need to read Who Fears Death, the award-winning magic realism novel. Yes, this is the author who was with George R.R. Martin at the 2018 Emmy Awards, and it’s because HBO is adapting this novel for a television series with George R.R. Martin as an executive producer. This book is a gift given to us by its author, Nnedi Okorafor.

This story follows the life, the education, and the quest of Onyesonwu, whose name literally means “Who Fears Death?” She and her mother are labeled outcasts (because Onyesonwu is an “Ewu,” a mixed child of rape and violence), but they manage to find a home with Onyesonwu’s adoptive father, whom she tries to resurrect in the first chapter of the novel. Growing up, Onyesonwu learns about her “Eshu,” shape-shifting and magic abilities, and is determined to be taught by Aro—a sorcerer—about her powers, her biological father, and her destiny.

Just like George R.R. Martin, Nnedi Okorafor combines (African) history and culture into an epic tale that is part fantasy and part reality. Everyone is a victim of war, tradition, fear, and death. Expectations are met and the unexpected will keep readers engrossed. War, gender roles, and power make the story what it is as well.

8) His Dark Materials: The Golden Compass/The Northern Lights (1995) by Philip Pullman

Philip Pullman is known as “The Most Dangerous Man in England,” J.K. Rowling’s counterpart,” and “a well-known atheist.” In addition, he is an Oxford professor and an award winning children’s author. Pullman is currently one of six authors to win both the “Guardian Children’s Fiction Prize” and “The Carnegie Medal” for the same book: The Northern Lights, or as it’s known in the U.S., The Golden Compass.

First published in 1995, this steampunk novel is an allusion—or, subtle connection to other works of literature—to John Milton’s Paradise Lost. Ironic, isn’t it? Furthermore, it could be argued that Pullman’s series is his response to Tolkien’s Middle-Earth and Lewis’ Narnia series. This first novel in the trilogy follows 11 year-old Lyra Belaqua, an orphan who goes on a journey to rescue her friend and other children from a religious order within her world, a world that is parallel and similar to our world.

The subplot of this trilogy is the cause and the effect religion has in a society. George R.R. Martin writes about various religions and about both their followers, and their fanatics. Unlike Martin, Pullman focuses on the darker side of Christianity. I’m not saying that I’m against Christianity, but every religion has its darker moments throughout history.

9) The Kingkiller Chronicles, Day 1: The Name of the Wind (2007) by Patrick Rothfuss

Fantasy fans have heard of this book, and if you have not read it yet, then you are really missing out on a great story. Patrick Rothfuss’ debut novel—which took 15 years to write—follows Kvothe, the protagonist, as he recalls the events of his childhood from youth to orphan to hero to expelled student. Do not let the length of the novel intimidate you. The story and the world building will seize you and leave you wanting more.

This novel looks into the making of a “living hero” and the “semi-retirement” of our protagonist Kvothe is a gifted individual who shows promise of what he’ll become eventually. He does attend a university to learn magic, which has its own rules and structure. Rothfuss incorporates realism by including the conviction, the trauma, and the struggles the protagonist faces as he grows up. In addition, readers learn a bit about the main antagonist, The Chandrian, through the author’s world building. There is a lot more to Kvothe’s world and past than Rothfuss lets on.

And, like George R.R. Martin, fans and readers have been waiting for the next and final book, Doors of Stone, to be released. In other words, fans of both Martin and Rothfuss will be able to relate to each other because both groups have been waiting for the next book for years! This is wishful thinking, but maybe we’ll get both The Winds of Winter, and Doors of Stone in the same year! Or, maybe Lin-Manuel Miranda will release his version of a soundtrack to The Kingkiller Chronicles!

 

10) The Broken Earth: The Fifth Season (2015) by N.K. Jemisin

This award-winning novel from the award-winning trilogy is one of my favorite books of all-time! And, if you have not read The Fifth Season yet, then I suggest you do so immediately! Speculative fiction is changing and this novel is one of many behind the new popularity of this genre of fiction!

In the distant future, where the Earth suffers long-term damage from earthquakes and volcanoes, people with the power to control the planet’s stability are enslaved in order to prevent the planet from destroying its life forms. You learn about the world, its history, and its culture from various characters told from multiple points of view. As you get further along in the story, you realize that not only do you become attach to all of the characters and understand their motives, but also recall everything you learned back in your high school science classes!

This book will remind fans of George R.R. Martin as to why characters are just as important to the story as the world building. You cannot have one without the other. The people make the world and its many societies, and the world and its societies determine what happens to its people. The world is already broken, and the people must decide on whether or not it should be fixed.

Those are some of the many books I recommend for you to read while we continue waiting for The Winds of Winter. These recommendations, and their sequels, should be enough to occupy your time while we continue to wait for the 6th book—remember, the 7th and final book in the series, A Dream of Spring, will have its own separate waiting period. As you read, there are several books to choose from, and there are more that I was not able to mention because I wished to keep this list short. All genres and sub-genres were mentioned in this list because their stories are captivating whether or not it’s meant for children, adults, graphic novel readers, or folklore fans.

The settings and the influence surrounding these stories should make you aware that each region and culture on planet Earth has influenced the way these authors present their stories to us. Plus, reading other contemporary works of George R.R. Martin will provide insight to what we—as fans and as readers—can and cannot expect from these modern speculative authors. These are stories of how society affects the characters and their world with magical and spiritual elements.

Please either message me on social media, or in the comments below on what you think of my recommendations. Have you read any of these books? Which ones are your favorite from this list? Is there a book I forgot to mention, or that you recommend I should read? What would your choices be? Please let me know.