TV Episode Review: “Deadly Class: Stigmata Martyr”

Note: There are some minor spoilers in this review. You have been warned. 

            The fun ends and the consequences are mounting up in this follow up episode. A student died—due to “unknown circumstances”—and Kings Dominion is investigating because the family of the student wants to know what happened, which is understandable. However, no one is talking and the school, and the student’s crew, is losing patience. 

            The school administration conducts the investigation into how and why the student was killed off campus and why the body has not been found (a change from the graphic novel). In addition, the investigation observes the conduct of all of the classes and since it’s being done subtlety, some of the instructors find themselves in a position of compromise. One class in particular may or may not get a new instructor. 

            Maria, feeling both guilt and relief, decides she doesn’t need her medication anymore. This is a bad idea for several reasons the most obvious being that her behavior keeps changing and everyone at the school is watching her. A combination of emotions and mental health, including trauma, is not good for Maria. At the same time, Marcus’ former roommate, who survived the fire also, continues his desperation to gaining what he believed Marcus “stole” from him. Now, that someone outside of the school knows about the events in Las Vegas and the school’s existence, Marcus and his friends have to figure out a way to make another problem go away.

            In all, Stigmata Martyrreminds viewers that there are rules, consequences and conduct associated within a school, even ones for assassins. The fighting sequence on the school grounds was one of the episode’s highlights as well as Billy’s temperament in one of his classes. Marcus, Saya, Maria and Billy handle the circumstances in their own way, which makes us realize that they’re slowly becoming desensitized to murder. Yet, the friends will need to be desensitized in order to be ready for what’s about to come. 

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The Shortlist Award Reading Challenge 2019

It seems that my #1 goal for 2019 is to exhaust myself into completing all of the other goals I have made for myself: get a job, read 100 books, read and post about ARCs, connect with authors and editors, work on my content for my social media pages, finish some of my WIP for submission, etc. Now, I’ve decided that I’m going to read the books that are nominated for various book awards.

            I’m going to call it: The Shortlist Award Reading Challenge. Last year, I followed the Hugo Awards closely because I knew that The Stone Skyby N.K. Jemisin was going to win “Best Novel,” and All Systems Redby Martha Wells was going to win “Best Novella.” However, as I was looking at the shortlist for the other categories, I realized that I read many of the books and watched many of the media that were nominated. So, I decided to read as many of the other nominees as I could before the winners were announced. Not only did I caught up to many recent series, but also I started reading works by authors who had been writing in the genre for several years. I read what I could access through libraries, bookstores, and the Internet. This process was very insightful. Soon, I was able to select whom I believed should win the Hugo Awards. While I was correct in who won in categories such as Best Novel and Best Novella, I was wrong in other categories such as John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer. 

            After the winners of the Hugo Awards were announced, I made a reaction video and posted it on my YouTube channel. Then, I continued looking into the nominees and their works. For example, while I am a huge fan of Katherine Arden’s Winternight TrilogyI understood why Rebecca Roanhorse won the award in the category—Best New Writer—over her. And, I realized that some works won in the same category at other awards, and then there were a few awards in which one book won over another book. It makes you wonder if there was a difference in who voted based on preference and/or guidelines. Not to mention, one notices that other works win awards due to the way they stand out from the rest of the nominees per category.

            Like everyone else, I read what is released when I am able to do so. In addition to reading my usual genres—fantasy, science fiction, magic realism, contemporary, classics, graphic novels, etc.—I read many debut novels and I catch up on series that were unknown to me previously. Now, with the 2019 Award Season gaining momentum, I’m excited to see what is nominated and who could win. TV shows and movies can be viewed from at least one viewing before comparing them. Video games are similar to books in that one must invest the time needed to immerse themselves within that narrative. I will comment on these categories for the given awards as well. As of right now, I noticed that once again, there are many books that I have not read, but I am willing to read as many of them as I can before the winners are announced. 

            I want to be able to determine for myself why these books and media have been nominated for these awards. I keep using the terms “books” and “media” because both fiction and non-fiction works get nominated, and movies, television shows, and video games get nominated, too. This is not only a chance to insert myself into what I might have missed otherwise, but also learn how and why these selections were nominated in the first place. 

            So, between now and the end of the 2019 award season, I will read as many of the nominated books and watch as many of the nominated media as I can. This way I can give my critiques before and after the awards. If you want to see the compiled list for the awards I will be following, reading, and critiquing, then please checkout this list on my Google Docs page: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1yzQEUvGTILR2LaGMVCibEbeZXp1q5PlSQIch9c0Q-IQ/edit. This list will be updated throughout the award season in order to add to the list, to highlight my reading progress, to provide access to my reviews of the nominees, and to mark the winners of each award in each category.

            In addition, I will be continuing to upload reviews to this blog. Some of the nominees were reviewed previously, and I will continue to add more to my website so that you all have a better understanding of what each book is about. In other words, I’ll do the reading—which, you can do as well—and I’ll let you look over my notes, similar to what I did back in high school. As I complete the list of nominees—regardless of which award each one is nominated for—I will write, upload and share my review. As each awards ceremony gets closer, I will upload both a blog post and a YouTube video with my “prediction” on who should win and why. And, after each award ceremony, I will upload my reaction video on the winners. This is an arduous path I’ve put myself on, but I’m eager to attempt and to accomplish this ambitious goal. 

            Just so everyone knows, this will slow down my progress on my ARCs, essays, theories, and other reviews and content I am currently working on. However, they will get completed, eventually. The only thing that will put a complete halt on everything I’ve been doing is starting a new job—which I really, really need right now—and reworking my schedule to accomplish everything.

            All that being said and addressed, I hope you either follow me, or participate with me as I read as many books as I can and offer my opinions on them. There will be many awards that I won’t be able to add to this challenge, but I’m open to the names and the nominees of each of them. Who knows? I might have read some of those books already, too. This year’s award season is going to be very exciting due to ALL of the nominees. It’s going to be very close, so close that I might have to predict a (potential) second winner within some of the categories. Bring on the 2019 Shortlist Award Reading Challenge! Will you join me? 

TV Episode Review: “Deadly Class: Mirror People”

Note: There are some minor spoilers in this review. You have been warned. 

            This episode diverted from the overused references of 1980s pop culture, finally. Instead, viewers learned more about the students at Kings Dominion. Similar to The Breakfast Club, different students, including Marcus, find themselves in detention for their actions during the school dance. Only, this episode does not end with reconciliation and understanding.

            Mirror Peoplefocuses on Saya, Billy, and Chico. Saya and Chico find themselves in a weekend’s long detention with Marcus and a few of their other classmates, and they decide to break into the “Confiscation Room” for some fun. The students suddenly find themselves under attack; they soon realize that it’s not a “test,” but a real attack. Saya recognizes the attackers immediately, but is willing to fight back in order to protect her classmates who have become innocent bystanders. Saya is the target, but for some reason she isn’t ready to forgo her education to leave with them willingly.

            In the midst of the attack, Chico continues to show his true demeanor. He allows one of his classmates to die, he leaves the other two to bleed out, and he locks Saya and Marcus within the dungeon in order to save himself and to forgo his remaining punishment. All of his actions are noticed by his classmates and Master Lin, but viewers are left wondering if Chico is acting on his instincts, or if he’s really afraid of not living up to his family’s potential as a member of the Cartel. 

            Away from the Detention Crew, viewers learn more about Billy and how he ended up at Kings Dominion. Billy’s father is involved with some dangerous people everyone is familiar with, but he’s incompetent with his responsibilities to his job and his family. Billy’s actions determines the treatment of his mother and his brother, at least that’s what he allows himself to believe. This storyline will pickup in the next episode, but viewers are left wondering whether or not parents are responsible for their children’s circumstances. Family expectations and upbringing are the subplots of this episode. 

            In all, Mirror People is the turning point to this series. While Kings Dominion is a school, it is a school that trains future assassins. And, because the parents—those who have them—enroll their children within the school, their families know the school’s location. This means that whenever something happens, the students are not safe. Viewers knew that anything could happen to the characters outside of the school, but now they know that anything can and will happen inside the school. Also, now that a student has died within the school from outside forces, viewers are left wondering which of the main characters will be the first to die. 

TV Episode Review: “Deadly Class”: “Snake Pit”

Note: There are some minor spoilers in this review. You have been warned. 

            This episode of Deadly Classwas split into two parts. One, the students interacting with each other, again; but this time pranks are involved. Two, we learn more about the teachers and the administration who operate Kings Dominion. This episode continues to build characterization and world building for the viewers to enjoy and to comprehend.

            The storyline of the students is a continuation of the previous episode, only this time tensions of the school year are starting to affect the different cliques at the school. This means that pranks are carried out in order to present a type of dominance amongst the student body. Each prank becomes more outrageous and more vengeful than the last one until the teachers get involve and put an end to it all. 

            The teachers’ storyline captures the attention of this episode. When the Poison Instructor attempts to resign due to his belief that the school had strayed from its original purpose, Master Lin tries to plead his case with the “administration” because one of the rules the students must follow—do not reveal the location of the school—must be followed by the adults there as well. The Poison Master must either remain at the school, or be killed. Master Lin’s decision will have consequences, but it doesn’t seem like he’ll be the one to receive them directly. 

            In all, Snake Pitwas more of a buildup to the next part of the story. Granted, some days at school are more mundane than others. However, given that the first season has 10 episodes, I hope the show starts presenting more attention than cliché drama amongst students of “similar backgrounds.” The teachers were more interesting than the students, and that is both good and bad. Hopefully, we’ll see the upcoming tensions—and final exams—play out simultaneously. 

TV Episode Review: “Deadly Class: Noise, Noise, Noise”

Note: There are some minor spoilers in this review. You have been warned. 

The second episode in the new series displays the aftermath and the continuation of the events that took place in the Pilot episode. Marcus is traumatized by his first kill, but cannot take any credit for participating in the murder, which Willie has no problem doing. Unfortunately, for Marcus and the rest of his classmates, they have to participate in a pop quiz in order to redeem themselves. Marcus and a few of the other students pass, the rest of class fails.

            The majority of the episode reminds teacher, students, and viewers that the students at King’s Dominion are adolescents who behave like adolescents. So, a house party—set up by one of the “goop” students—is the distraction that is welcomed. The party is typical: everyone shows up, the house gets thrashed, everyone gets drunk and high, energy and emotions are running high, then the cops appear and the party is over. The party is where viewers learn more about the students from the school. Now, there are some minor changes from the graphic novel, but it fits well with what viewers are to expect from the show, which is most of the students are using falsehoods in order to maintain a reputation. This “act” is common in all adolescents. 

            Marcus seems to be the only one who doesn’t have a problem venting his emotions. And yet, viewers learn by the end of the episode that that is not true. On top of the cliché moments in this episode, viewers realize that King’s Dominion’s roster contains a lot of frauds. It makes viewers wonder why certain characters are more comfortable with killing over their insecure classmates. And, by the end of the episode, viewers will ask: What else happened to Marcus? What will happen to Maria? Is Saya comfortable with “spying” on her classmates?

            In all, Noise, Noise, Noiseis an episode that focuses more on the development of the characters and the setting. The 1980s was a turning point for health risks and international relations in the United States. And, we see how the characters continue to deal with puberty, angst and social welfare. While the episode leaves the viewer with more questions than answers, we know that it won’t be long until we get the answers that we want.  

Media Adaptations to Consider: “Deadly Class”

PLEASE NOTE: The following a few spoilers from this series. You have been warned.

Television has joined movies with the many media adaptations of books of numerous genres. TV has turned popular graphic novels, YA, contemporary and classic books into a format worth watching. Game of Thrones has been successful for HBO, The Walking Dead and Preacher have been popular on AMC, and the CW has adapted many of the D.C. Comics into 1-hour episodes: Arrow, The Flash, Legends of Tomorrow, Supergirl, etc. The SyFy Network has done the same thing with The Magiciansand Nightflyers. Now, that channel has decided to adapt, Deadly Class, a graphic novel series by Rick Remender and Wes Craig.

            2018’s San Diego Comic Con premiered the trailer for Deadly Class. Upon learning this news, I wasn’t at SDCC, I was both shocked and excited. I was excited to see one of my favorite graphic novel series make the transition to TV. Yet, Deadly Classis not a “positive” homage to the 1980s like Stranger Things. As both the title, and the cover of the graphic novel suggests, this is a dark and gritty story that takes place during the forgotten reality of America’s recent history.

            Pop culture has people remembering the 1980s with Michael Jackson’s music, John Hughes’ movies, video and arcade games, and MTV. However, history points out that the 1980s had Americans dealing with the Drug War, the long-term effects of the end of the Vietnam War, the end of the Cold War, the rise of the AIDS Epidemic, Reaganomics, and the Reagan Administration. The last one is emphasized in this series as a cautionary tale of how funding cuts hurts more people than help them. Thus, we get the story for Deadly Class.

            Marcus Lopez Arguello, played by Benjamin Wadsworth, is a homeless orphan who is suicidal. Traumatized by both his parents’ deaths and his foster care experience, Marcus holds his rage inside until it bursts into flames, literally. Afterwards, Marcus finds himself on the radar of both the police and the headmaster of an elite school. Obviously, Marcus chooses the latter and becomes a student at the Kings Dominion School of the Deadly Arts. There, Marcus must learn to survive his classes and his classmates. And, Marcus gets regular assignments such as reading The Anarchist Cookbookand killing people. 

            The Pilot of Deadly Class has been on the SyFy website for a few weeks, but it officially premiered on January 16th. Judging from the Pilot, the TV show is a direct and excellent adaptation of the series. The tone and the characters are aligned with the presentation found in both media formats. However, it needs to be said that both the graphic novel and the TV show presents the darker side of humanity through angry, but privileged adolescents. I read the first 4 volumes, back when they were released, which covers the first arc of the story, and the only “spoiler” I can give is: DON’T GET TOO ATTACHED TO THE CHARACTERS! Deadly Class is a story about students who are learning to become assassins. Not all assassins live to an “old” age, so what makes you believe all of the ones in training will survive to graduation?

            The Russo Brothers are the producers of Deadly Class, and with the work they’ve done within the Marvel Cinematic Universe, I’m not worried about the adaptation faltering. In fact, I expect the characters to become more rounded than in the graphic novels. The casting met my expectations—Benedict Wong and Henry Rollins—and it looks like the first season will spend a lot of time exploring the backgrounds and the circumstances of all the characters, and how they grow into the roles placed on them. This TV show looks very promising, and I know I won’t be disappointed. So, if you’re looking for a TV show with a realistic storyline, with the violence of Game of Thronesand Romein a high school setting similar to The Magiciansand Battle Royale, then Deadly Classis for you!

            I will be writing weekly reviews of each episode for the first season of Deadly Class, but I’ll only do video reviews for both the season premiere and the season finale. This way, I can give my feelings on both the shows’ growth and whether or not it remains faithful to the books. That being said, I’ll continue to re-read the first arc of Deadly Class, and I hope you enjoy the series as much as I do. 

Why You Need to Read: Battle Royale: The Novel

 

Battle Royale: The Novel

By: Koushun Takami

Translated by: Yuji Oniki

Published: April 1999 (Japan); February 26, 2003 (in English)

Genre: Science Fiction/Dystopian/Horror

 

PLEASE NOTE: The following contains spoilers from this novel. You have been warned.

Shuya took a moment to think before he received his black day pack, and he did the same as he approached Fumiyo Fujiyoshi’s corpse, shutting his eyes. He wanted to remove the knife from her forehead but decided against it.

            When he stepped out of the classroom, he felt a pang of regret, wishing he had removed it for her.

            40 STUDENTS REMAINING(Chapter 6).

 

The Most Dangerous Game (1924) by Richard Connell and Lord of the Flies (1954) by William Golding are two of the many required readings for schools in the United States and in other countries. Their plots are straightforward: protagonist(s) ends up on an island in which they have to survive on and survive from the individual(s) who are trying to kill him/them. Then, on September 1, 2009, The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins was published with a movie deal in the works. After the movie was released in 2012, a few critics of “independent” and “foreign” movies were mentioning Battle Royale. Some fans of the movie accused Suzanne Collins of “stealing” the concept of Battle Royale for The Hunger Games. And, that’s not true. Adults (and children) killing each other for no reason happen all the time, sadly.

It is said that the author, Koushun Takami, read Lord of the Flies and found it to be good, but “outdated.” Inspired by other books and action movies, Takami wrote Battle Royale.The text is an expansion to Golding’s book in that there are both male and female students, there are 42 of them, there are more point-of-view chapters from many of those characters, and the deaths are plentiful and gruesome!

In addition to the 42 students and two teachers, there is the “Team Leader.” While we don’t get the P.O.V.s of all of the characters, we gain both the personalities and the upbringings of all of them. And, since this is a novel about adolescents in a dystopian society, it’s not a spoiler to let you know that some of these students do NOT come from good homes. Plus, multiple P.O.V.s means that the readers will learn the reasons the students either participate, or don’t participate in the “program.”

The plot of Battle Royale is straightforward: an entire class of Japanese students are abducted and forced to participate in a deadly game of manhunt. Each student is given a duffel bad with supplies and a random weapon. All of the students are set loose on an island and the “game” remains active until one student is left alive. Additionally, someone must die every 24 hours, or a detonation device goes off, killing ALL OF THEM!

The narrative goes from 1st person to 3rd person over and over again. This is done when more than one student is around to comprehend the mood of the story. Plus, we learn the backstory of several of the students and we learn why, or why not, each of them participates in the “game.” Some of these students are damaged, some are entitled, and the rest are scared.

The style is action-paced with students dying throughout the “game” in numerous ways. Takami’s tone reflects what he’s attempting to pull off: a cringe-worthy and addictive story of kids who are forced to take part in what their broken society wants them to, without their—or their families’—consent.

The appeal—like any other story of this sort—was originally controversial. It turned out Takami was worried that his novel would be classified as “dark” and “violent,” and he waited two years to have it published! At first, critics in Japan were disturbed by the violence. Afterwards, it became both popular and a best seller. The quick-paced plot and the storyline and believable characters intrigued the public. Takami gave his readers something that William Golding did not: female characters. Battle Royale reminds readers that everyone has a dark and lethal side within themselves.

Almost immediately after Battle Royale’s publication, a movie was ordered and released in 2000. Directed by the late Kinji Fukasaku, the movie matches the pace of the book, and the death of the characters. The film adaptation was a success in Japan and was going through “the undergrounds” outside of its home country. You can watch it on Netflix. Of course, the movie has been called “one of my favorites” by Quentin Tarentino, and is labeled as “the story ripped off by The Hunger Games, which (again) is not true, but more on that another time (Read: “It All Started with…Lord of the Flies). There is a manga adaptation that I have NOT read, but will eventually, but the movie will NOT let you down!

I enjoyed this novel because the author took the concept of “fighting to the death” to a whole different level. Unlike The Hunger Games, the location is deserted, so the characters are allowed to reside inside the buildings. Similar to Lord of the Flies, the characters, these adolescents, run amok due to their emotional state. And, let’s not forget the influence from The Most Dangerous Game! A handful of these students are hunting down their classmates! Battle Royale is an update and an expansion to our school assigned readings. But, keep in mind you’ll need to read those three stories in order to appreciate this import from Japan.

My final rating: Enjoy It!