Reading Check-In: November 27, 2021

What have you finished reading recently?

I’ve been working my way through reading the “Sapphic Trifecta,” which I started earlier this year, but I had to halt because I was working on my final project for grad school. So far, I’ve finished reading 2 of the 3 books, which are amazing reads. However, do not expect reviews of them until after the New Year.

The latest audiobook I finished was the debut space opera by J.S. Dewes. The voice actors were brilliant!

What are you currently reading?

The third book in the Sapphic Trifecta (which was published first).

I just started this audiobook. So far, I’m enjoying this book A LOT more than Ready, Player One.

What will you read next?

So far, I’ve read Part I of this epic dark vampire fantasy. I’m looking forward to finishing it.

I started reading this series when the first volume was released and I enjoyed it! Think of DIE as a hybrid between Jumanji and Dungeons & Dragons, but with more trauma and graver consequences. I kept purchasing the volumes so I could keep up with the narrative. I haven’t read past the 2nd volume, so this will be both a reread and a read through. I want this to be the 1st graphic novel series I review on this blog. I am hoping to start reviewing graphic novels, manga and comics in the near future.

There are other books I will be reading throughout the end of 2021, but these are the books that have my upmost attention. I am closer to my aim for compiling a Top 20 of 2021 List, which will be interesting to put together. My Top 5 is starting to change and I know no longer which books will place there.

What are you trying to finish by the end of this year?

Books and Book Series I Hope to Read in 2022

This year, 2021, is almost over. And, while I should be plowing through what’s left of my reading for this year (and writing up reviews), I wanted to post about speculative fiction titles that were released in recent years that I haven’t been able to read yet for multiple reasons (i.e. grad school). These are titles I didn’t forget about, I just didn’t have the time to read them when I wanted to read them.

FYI: I did start reading the books mentioned on this list (~50 pages), so the desire to read and to complete each book is there. But, similar to everything else, I lacked the time to read it when I wanted to (which, in most cases, was when each book was released). The reason why these books have remained on my radar is because I’ve read enough of the beginning of each book to conclude that these books are worth my time to read.

Confession: I am NOT a fan of The Inheritance Series. I tried reading Eragon when it was released, but the obvious allusions and inspirations did not impress me, and I never made it to the halfway point of that book (I gave that book and Book 2 to a younger neighbor who enjoyed them; I was an undergrad at the time).

That out of the way, when this book was first announced, I was curious to how the author has grown as a writer and as a storyteller. Not to mention, the premise of the story caught my attention. An unknown entity is discovered, but takes over the body of a scientist, but is hostile only when threaten. I want to know what happens next; and, I’m curious to witness the start of what is supposed to be a new sci-fi universe.

All that being said, I might end up listening to the audiobook.

I received an eARC of this book and I managed to read the first 2 chapters. Unfortunately, even though I enjoyed where the story was going, I wasn’t able to finish reading it when I wanted to. That being said, I haven’t heard anything bad about this book by those who have read it. Not to mention, the premise surrounding the plot is very intriguing. I do want to read this book so I can jump right into The Thousand Eyes when it is released.

I tried to listen to the audiobook edition of this book, and after about an hour and a half I lost track of the narrative, which led me to stop listening. However, I decided that I still wanted to read the story because I have heard excellent things about this book (and I got it signed by the author at an event!). In addition, thanks to some further reading, I have a better understanding of the style of writing and narrative presented here. Not to mention, the upcoming sequel, Moon Witch, Spider King, sounds promising.

I know what you’re going to say, but hear me out. I have started reading this book 3 times and all at the wrong times. This story is part dark fantasy and part occult fiction with an academic setting. So, reading this book while I was still in grad school was a bad idea. I do want to finish reading this book, especially since it’s by a respected author and the series sounds very interesting. This one will most likely be read through the audiobook format.

Tor/Forge was kind enough to send me this book knowing I’m a fan of historical (fantasy) fiction. Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to read this book immediately. Originally written in Polish, this book has a similar plot and conflict which reminds me of both The Daevabad Trilogy and the Winternight Trilogy where royal families and magical beings and/or gods clash. I really want to read this book, especially since it is the first in a series. Hopefully, the translation for Book 2 has already started.

Believe it or not, I own this book and The Glass Hotel, but I haven’t been able to read either book. However, I read the synopsis for the author’s upcoming novel, Sea of Tranquility, and I’m already obsessed with reading the book (when it comes out). I won this book in a giveaway, but I want to read this book not only because it’s critically acclaimed, but also because I want to familiarize myself with the author’s prose and style before her next book releases.

Good ahead and say it, “what are you waiting for?!” It’s been a busy year! I will dive into the Abercrombie Pantheon soon! I really, really am trying to make the time for this series, but there are not enough hours in a day to read everything we want to read. That being said, I am aware that once I start reading this author’s books I won’t be able to stop.

Knowing my luck, I probably won’t get through reading/listening to these books (and their sequels), but that’s the point of having goals, right? You make them with plans to accomplish them. The difference here is that I really, really want to read these books, so I know I will make the extra effort, along with all of the other books and book series I need to read.

What about you?

Reading Check-In: July 31, 2021

What book have you finished reading recently?

O!M!G! This book…WOW!

I started reading this eARC at the beginning of the year, but I had to stop because of classes. It turns out that I stopped at the right spot because I was able to dive back into the story when the story, the plot and the characters continued to developed.

It’s not speculative fiction, but it’s still enjoyable so far. I haven’t watched the movie yet, but I did read some of the Sherlock Holmes books as a kid so I had high hopes for this book. This is the 7th book in the series and the only one I’ve read so far; and, it’s an excellent spinoff!

What are you reading currently?

I’ll be reading this book throughout the weekend. I don’t know whether or not I’ll finish it by then, but I expect to make some more progress.

There are 2 plots within this story, but it seems like only one of them will continue onto Book 2!

What will you read next?

There is a reason why I started reading this book, which I can’t get into yet. That being said, I should have tried to read the eARC I received when I had the time.

I should read this book before the next one in the series is released.

I haven’t forgotten about this book!

I want to read this book BEFORE its publication.

I know my list of books keeps getting shuffled, but I read what I want when I’m in the mood and when I have the time.

Reading Check-In: July 17, 2021

A brief update about my readings.

But first, not that this should be a goal of mine, but I decided to reduce this year’s Goodreads (yes, I have a Storygraph account) reading goal from 100 books to 50 books. At the beginning of this year, I knew there I shouldn’t have pushed my limits this year due to other life factors (read my midyear post), but I decided to push my limits. Halfway through 2021, I knew that it would be better if I focused on finishing the books I was reading without worrying about how many I was reading. Honestly, I just want to read the books because I want to not because I’m worried about a number.

What book have you finished recently?

Both the plot development and the world-building were brilliant! And, we have a cover for the final book in this series! Both the cover and the finale are going to be EPIC!!!

What are you reading currently?

I’m about halfway through both of these books. And, I can tell you right now, you need to read both of them!

What will you read next?

I started reading these books when I received them as ARCs, but as you all know, I had to halt my reading to focus on other priorities. These books have been out for some time and I want to finish reading them before the end of the year.

As for recent releases and other ARCs, you’ll know which one(s) I start reading when I do.

Yes, I know that these are all fantasy books! You can read my recent sci-fi reviews in my previous posts!

The Midpoint of 2021: Favorite Speculative Fiction Books…So Far

Well, we’ve made it to the halfway point of 2021. I won’t begin this post with the usual current events, but I will mention that I’ve been enjoying ALL of the sporting events that are taking place (i.e. Euro Cup, Copa America, NBA & NHL Playoffs, Summer 2020/21 Olympic Trials, etc.). More attention has been given to both books and video games as those who’ve been at home continue to remember that they’re both entertaining and artistic.

As for me, I’ve been recovering from an exhausted winter and spring. This is because, as a few of you know, I went back to graduate school in order to earn a MA degree in Library and Information Science. For the last 2 years, I’ve been taking classes on an accelerated pace in order to complete the program sooner rather than later. No, COVID-19 wasn’t an “imminent” threat when I started back in Fall 2019; and yes, it was an interesting experience completing the program throughout the majority of the pandemic, work my part-time job outside of my residence, and continue working on my blog. In addition, I’ve only told my closest friends and acquaintances (including you) about this, meaning I’ve managed to work on a degree without my ENTIRE family knowing about it. And, unless they read this post, then it will stay that way until I am ready to make an announcement, which will be sometime after I get a job within my field (whenever that may be).

Why am I mentioning this now? Simple, it’s because during my last semester, I had to work on graduating on time and in order to do that I had to cutback on SOME of my reading. Those of you who follow me on Goodreads will notice that I’m behind on my Reading Goal and I’m lagging on completing the books I’m reading currently. I won’t get into my TBR piles both from Netgalley and Edelweiss! It’s NOT that the books are bad in anyway, I’m still mentally exhausted from all of the work I had to do in order to graduate on time; not to mention all of the other events called life.

I am starting to feel better and I started to catch up on both my reading and my writing (including reviews). You’ve noticed that I started posting reviews again, but remember I read faster than I write. Which brings me to another announcement: I realized that my 200th post is upcoming and I plan on writing another “special” piece in order to commemorate the milestone. What will it be? You just have to wait.

Now, for what you’ve been waiting for:

Books I’ve Finished Reading:

Across the Green Grass Fields

First, Become Ashes

Tower of Mud and Straw (It was nominated for a Nebula Award for “Best Novella”!)

The Bone Shard Daughter (Yes, it was released in 2020, but the sequel comes out later this year!)

The Light of the Midnight Stars

Chaos Vector (Just in time to read the final book in the trilogy!)

Fugitive Telemetry

Over the Woodward Wall (Along the Saltwise Sea comes out this fall!)

Shards of Earth (My 1st Book Tour!)

And, A LOT of Paranormal & Fantasy Romance Books by Indie Authors (That’s for a future post!)

Books I’m Reading Currently:

The Empire’s Ruin

The House of Always

She Who Became the Sun

The Unbroken

The Jasmine Throne

The Gilded Ones

Books I Want to Read by the End of 2021:

The Broken God

Firebreak

The Fire Keeper’s Daughter

House of Hollow

The Unspoken Name

The Witch’s Heart

For the Wolf

The Two-Faced Queen

The Next 2 Books in The First Argentines Series

The sequels of the upcoming books mentioned; more paranormal & fantasy romance books; and, several MORE books I can’t list here because otherwise, this post would be never-ending.

I don’t know whether or not I will be able to read the books mentioned by the end of this year. I’m still trying to catch up from last year’s TBR! So right now, I want to thank the authors, the other bloggers, Fantasy-Faction, all of the publishers and the agents for being both supportive and understanding as I continue to work my way through the last 6 months, and for encouraging me to continue working on my other writings.

Speaking of “other” writings, please keep an eye out for any upcoming essays and lists I will continue to share here. Any and all feedback are welcome.

We’re halfway through 2021. What are your plans for the rest of the year?

Also, if you haven’t already, then please read the essay I wrote that was published on the SFWA website! Click here to access it.

Why You Need to Read: “The Priory of the Orange Tree”

The Priory of the Orange Tree

By: Samantha Shannon                                    Audiobook: 25 hours 52 minutes

Published: February 26, 2019                          Narrated by: Liyah Summers

Genre: Epic Fantasy

            A low growl rolled through Nayimathun. She spoke as if to herself. “He is stirring. The shadow lies heavy on the West,” (Chapter 25, East).

            Avid readers—especially those who read history, biographies and memoirs, and speculative fiction—do not fear tackling “long” books. In fact, many readers get upset when a long book is about to come to an end. Then, there are “long” books in which readers ask themselves, “how am I going to get through this?” This is what I asked myself when I heard about The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon. This 800+ page book was declared “one of the Best of 2019,” and other readers who have managed to finish the book had nothing but positive things to say about it. First, I borrowed the standalone novel from my library and started to read it. However, I knew I would need more than 2 weeks to read this book (library policy). So, I bought the eBook—when it was on sale—and I kept reading. Yet, I felt I wasn’t reading it at my usual pace. So then, I bought the audiobook and started listening to it from the beginning. It took me two months, but I enjoyed every minute of it! And, I bought the printed edition because I wanted my own hardcopy edition of the book (and it was half off)! I don’t regret purchasing these editions of this novel! The Priory of the Orange Tree is Samantha Shannon’s epic fantasy novel about female leaders, dragons, conspiracies—both political and historical—imminent danger, and identity. Don’t allow the length of the story to intimidate you, this epic tale details everything that occurs throughout this fantasy adventure!

            Like most epic fantasies, there are several characters who are part of the story and play their roles. Yet, there are three protagonists who provide both the point-of-view and the connections both to the events and to several other main characters throughout the narrative. First, there is Tané, a poor orphan who is given the rare opportunity to train as a dragonrider. Overcoming the rigorous training and her destitute status, Tané is about to Test to become a dragonrider for her island home in the East. However, on the night before the Passage, an outsider washes on to the beach. Fearing that the outsider will cause a delay of the Tests—outsiders are quarantined in order to prevent any illnesses from spreading into the population— Tané hides the outsider at the home of a resident who is also not from the island. This leads to the second protagonist, Doctor Niclays Roos (a male) who resides in the East in exile after failing to please the Queen in the West. This Queen in the West, Sabran the Ninth of House Berethnet, has remained unwed since her coronation. This is a dilemma because one of her roles as queen is to bear a daughter in order to protect her kingdom from an ancient evil. However, Queen Sabran’s time consists of avoiding assassination attempts and suffering from vivid nightmares. But, she has allies. One of them is the third protagonist, Ead Duryan—one of the ladies-in-waiting to the Queen—who is really a member of a hidden society of mages whose mission centers around protecting the royal bloodline of House Berethnet, and the entire world, from Armageddon. These protagonists are rounded—they have strengths and weaknesses, they are selfish and sympathetic, they are motivated, and they are survivors—which make them believable to the readers as their narratives are presented to them. These protagonists are neither royalty nor the elite social class, which is relevant because they are able to maneuver through their societies with access to the knowledge and the information given to them by the upper class. At the same time, these protagonists are able to uncover the truth of the past for themselves and of their societies and the world they live in. And, it’s up to them to try and save it. Yet, out of the three protagonists, it is both Tané and Ead Duryan who demonstrate the most character development. Even though both women make mistakes and lose the trust of their friends and allies, they hold on to their convictions that danger is coming. Meanwhile, Doctor Niclays Roos decides to start up the same research that led to his exile. He doesn’t have anything to lose, but his experience is essential to the plot. Although, the band of characters make it difficult to keep track of at times, they appear and are mentioned enough for readers to recall who they are and their relationships to the protagonists and the other main characters. 

            The plot—similar to other fantasy and/or adventure tales—involves prophecies, magic and saving the world. About 1,000 years ago, heroes of the world defeated and sealed an ancient threat. However, the seal would break after a thousand years, so the heroes and the armies left and established new kingdoms—and secret orders—in order to prepare for the return of that ancient threat. Unfortunately, history becomes myth, and religion and legend with all sources of information becomes lost or altered. The story and the plot take place just as the 1,000 years are up, and the descendants are searching for a way to defeat the threat before it emerges. The subplots are how each of the four continents are preparing for Armageddon. Obviously, many do not believe or know that this event is about to occur. It takes time for the plot to develop because all of the subplots—from the introductions of the characters, the settings and the conflicts to the character development and the world-building—must develop alongside the plot. This is a slow, but an appropriate rate for the plots and the subplots to develop and to converge because this is a standalone novel. After the subplots have developed—not resolved—then the plot continues to develop on its own and at its own pace. 

            The narrative is told in present time and from the P.O.V.s of the protagonists. Each of the six parts of this story presents the stream-of-consciousness of Tané, Doctor Roos and Ead. This allows readers to comprehend the motives, the culture and the decisions they make throughout the story. Given that the protagonists have their desires and the events are happening in real-time, each part of the narrative is reliable because the revelations and the reactions are believable and the situations the characters find themselves in are because of the decisions and the demeanors of the characters. The narrative is easy to follow because of the step-by-step action and reaction narration presented to the readers. 

            The style Samantha Shannon uses for this novel is a combination of fantasy tropes, history, literature and folklore. In other words, The Priory of the Orange Tree is a reimagination of true events and culture. History and folklore such as Christianity, the Amazons, and dragons were influences for this novel. Historical moments and the literature that were written—the Crusades and stories such as The Faerie Queen by Edmund Spenser and The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley—are also found within the pages of the novel. The style the author uses for this story is not new; in fact, folklore and religion are often retellings of both history and culture. However, readers become aware of this while reading the story, but would they ever consider a similar possibility that the same thing could be possible with our life and culture? The mood of the novel is foreboding and callowness. The tone is what to do and how to handle information based on what actually took place and how the truth can remain hidden within all of the stories, the mysteries, and the lies for hundreds of years. The tone and the mood work in tandem, but this plot device is revealed to the readers through a handful of characters who know the (actual) truth. This reflects reality because the truth of events is revealed to a select few of people (typically) and that is only when the truth surfaces (not always).

            The appeal of this novel have been noteworthy. The Priory of the Orange Tree was labeled “one of the Best Fantasy Books of 2019,” by numerous critics and fans of epic fantasy written by Jacqueline Carey and Brandon Sanderson or any standalone fantasy story will enjoy this book the most. As for the narration of the audiobook, Liyah Summers did a great job voicing all of the characters—male and female—without there being any confusion as to which character was speaking and the accents used for each dialect of speech. Her pacing of the narration worked for both the length of the novel and the given size of the world as hinted from the numerous locations. Liyah Summers was a great choice for this large narration and its large assembly of characters. 

            The Priory of the Orange Tree is an ambitious story of strong female characters, dragons and wyverns, magic, conspiracies, lost histories, and the end-of-the-world. Anyone who is familiar with epic fantasy stories should read this book; and, fans of fantasy and speculative fiction should not be daunted by the size of the book, but know that the story within it contains a world with rich characters whose lives are about to become interconnected for reasons lost to their histories. Not only will readers be satisfied with the narration up to the end, but also feel a sense of accomplishment for completing this amazing and adventurous fantasy story. Readers will find the time and a way to read this book as I did.

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!!! 

Five Ways to Fit More Reading Into Your Day

This is a response to a post by fellow bookblogger, Shelts89, who gave his own ideas on how to squeeze more reading into a single day. If you want to read his post, then click here. Yes, there are so many hours within a day, but we always manage to make time for things we love to do. So, I’m going to expand the list with some of my suggestions on how to fit more reading into your day. 

  • Read before work and/or before bed.

I’m starting off where Shelts89 did. It’s true reading before bed allows me to enjoy the book I’m currently reading, and it gives me time to relax before I go to bed. So, no I don’t usually read horror and thriller stories before I go to sleep. 

As for reading in the morning, there are times I have some time in the morning to read a bit, so I usually do. Morning reads are great for reading a chapter or two in a novel, or for reading novellas and short stories. You’ll be surprised at what you can read when you have 20-30 minutes to spare.  

  • Read during meal breaks.

My last job (substitute teacher) and my current job (retail) gives me between 30-60 minutes for meals. It doesn’t take me that long to eat, but there isn’t enough time off with my coworkers for any socializing to happen. So, I have time to read a chapter or two in a book. Here’s the catch, if you have an e-reader, then this is a perfect time to use it. I’ve brought one of my hard copies to work, and I spent more time worrying about it getting messy than I enjoyed reading it. 

  • Listen to audiobooks. 

At first, I was worried about this format. I remember listening to audiobooks in school for assignments. And, part of the issue is the voice acting/speaker of the narration. Yet, with some of the recent long commutes I’ve been doing, there are great. In addition, they’re great to listen to while doing housework. I’ve managed to listen to several chapters while gardening and cooking. If the narration is done right, then you’ll find yourself as immersed in the story as if you were reading it!

  • Read at salons.

No, this is not only for females. Males attend both nail and hair salons, whether or not they’re customers or waiting with their companions. Hair salons—especially on weekends and right before holidays and special events (i.e. prom season)—are the best place to catch up on some reading. There are times when I have to predict how long I’ll be there because if I have around 100 pages or less in a book and I’m going to be at the hair salon for 3-4 hours, then I know I’ll finish the book while I’m there. As for nail salons, read #3!

  • Read while exercising on immobile equipment at the gym. 

I workout on a regular basis. I run outdoors and I do aerobics at the gym. However, I’m not immune to the elements. I live in New York, so during the winter, I do my workouts at the gym. Instead of running on the track, I go on one of the immobile machines. Reading from my e-reader while on one of these machines not only allows me to catch up on my reading, but also makes my workout seem to go faster. 

These are some of my techniques I use to keep up with my reading. What do you do?