Why You Need to Read: “Come Tumbling Down”

Wayward Children, #5: Come Tumbling Down

By: Seanan McGuire

Published: January 7, 2020

Genre: Fantasy/Horror

            “Everyone who comes here becomes a monster: you, me, your sister, everyone,” said Mary, voice low and fast and urgent. “The doors only open for the monsters in waiting. But you made the right choice when you left this castle, because you would have been the worst monster of them all if you had grown up in a vampire’s care.”

            “I know,” said Jack… (13: The Broken Crown).

            Responsibility is a trait which marks the coming of adulthood. The older we get, the more responsibility we get whether or not we want it. The concept of being responsible follows the practice of being reliable to others and being held accountable for your actions both good and bad. Even adults don’t always know who is reliable and who isn’t. Children and adolescents are given the benefit of the doubt due to their youth. However, once society deems the youth as “old enough to know better,” society expects the youth to follow the rules and obey the laws, or face the consequences. The Wayward Children series is about children and adolescents who traveled to other worlds for various reasons, and there are those who were kicked out of those worlds because they broke the rules. But, what happens when a traveler believes the rules shouldn’t apply to them? Fans of the series know of one example thanks to the past events in In An Absent Dream, but the author presents readers with an example occurring in the present in Come Tumbling Down.

            Readers catch up with the misfits at Eleanor West’s Home for Wayward Children: Christopher, who traveled to Mariposa; Cora, a Drowned Girl; Kade, a hero of Fairyland and headmaster-in-training; and Sumi, who—thanks to the events in Beneath the Sugar Sky—is alive and her old self again. It seems like an ordinary day at school, until lightning strikes the basement and a Door appears, but none of the students recognize it as theirs. This is because the Door swings inward revealing a large girl carrying a smaller one in her arms. No one recognizes the first girl, but the other girl is one of the Wolcott twins, but which one? It turns out that it’s Jack, but she’s in Jill’s body. Jack didn’t give her consent for the body swap; not to mention, Jack and Jill aren’t identical twins anymore since Jill’s death and resurrection. Jill’s death was one of two punishments she was dealt as consequence for breaking the rules in the Moors. Jill either had to remain in her world, or return after dying where she can no longer become a vampire. The problem was Jill proved to be as ruthless in our world as she is in the Moors, forcing Jack to make a decision to save her sister from herself. Unfortunately, everything blows up in Jack’s face, and Jill and her Master have decided to wreak havoc on the Moors, prompting a war between mad scientist and vampire, and between identical twin sisters. Jack flees the Moors with her fiancé, Alexis, to Eleanor West’s Home for Wayward Children so she can get help with getting her body back from Jill and save her Home. Throughout the story, readers learn more about Jack: what she’s been up to since returning to the Moors, and her future plans there with Dr. Bleak and Alexis. Jack is able to open herself up more to her former schoolmates than she was able to while staying at the school, which is a huge development for her character—and, as a (fictional) individual. Another character who develops in this story is Cora, but not in the “traditional” way. Cora—like the other students—hopes to return Home. However, it seems Cora has a deeper connection to the Drowned Worlds than everyone realizes, including Cora. 

            The plot in this story is sibling rivalry to extreme levels. Jack and Jill were kicked out of the Moors for Jill’s crimes (in Down Among the Sticks and Bones) and Jack made the decision to “change” Jill so both of them could return Home (in Every Heart A Doorway). Unfortunately for Jack, Jill views her twin’s actions as NOT “saving” her, but as “stealing eternity away from her.” Jill sees getting Jack’s body as a way to get everything she wants and damn the consequences. There are 2 main problems with this nonconsensual body swap. First, is that Jill and her Master believe they have found a loophole in the order of the Moors, but the rules in the Moors are strict and valid, and those in charge will NOT allow these transgressions to continue. Second, is Jack has OCD and she cannot cope with being in Jill’s body because of what the Master did to it; and, Jack has no intention of becoming a vampire, so she has to get her body back before the next full moon. There are 2 subplots in this story. The first is the concept of Death within some of these worlds. Just like in Confection, death isn’t permanent in the Moors. However, there are setbacks to being resurrected in the Moors—the body loses its function after each one—and time is of the essence. The second is the continued world-building of the Moors. We learn—through the other characters—how vast the world of the Moors is and about the Powers who run the Moors making sure ALL rules are followed. The subplots are necessary because they develop alongside the plot. Plus, everyone learns quickly how much trouble Jill is in for going against the order of the Moors. 

            The narrative follows a present sequence with moments of recounting the past (which is not the same as a flashback). It is presented in 3rd person omniscient from the points-of-view of Christopher, Cora and Jack. Readers learn how the Moors affect these characters who either reside in the Moors, or traveled to worlds similar to them—the Trenches and Mariposa. The streams-of-consciousness of the characters allow for the readers to experience Jack’s OCD, Cora’s attraction to the Drowned Worlds, and Christopher’s admiration and creepiness for the Moors make them all reliable narrators. 

            The style Seanan McGuire uses in Come Tumbling Down is a return to the concept of duality. However, unlike the idea of binary—which, was explored in Down Among the Sticks and Bones—the concept of oppositions is the focus. Identical twins find themselves on opposing sides of a challenge, which could evolve into a war, and their mentors are based on 2 of the most popular classic literary books and film characters: Frankenstein and Dracula. The allusions to both Vincent Price and the nursery rhyme, Jack and Jill, lets readers know there has to be a victor. The realization Jack admits about Jill make it obvious as to what must happen. The mood in the story is one of urgency. Everything in the Moors from the residents’ safety to Jack’s sanity is on the verge of being destroyed and Jack and her companions have 3 days to set things right. The tone in this story revolves around the outcome based on the urgency to answer the challenge. Jack and Jill are on opposing sides and the victor will determine the outcome of the balance within the Moors. There is more at stake than a stolen body, but one side doesn’t seem to care as long as they get what they want. Rovina Cai’s illustrations provide the extra context to the story as required. 

            The appeal for Come Tumbling Down have been positive. Fans of the Wayward Children series enjoyed this latest installment in the series as they travel with the students on another quest—remember, it’s against the rules to go on quests. And, while this portal-quest fantasy novella is a great addition to the fantasy canon, fans of horror will enjoy this book, too. The next book in the series, Across the Green Grass Fields, will bring readers back to the past.

            Come Tumbling Down is a fun story which balances adventure and rule-breaking as the characters and the readers return to the Moors. While it seems like this is the end of Jack and Jill’s story (for now?), I have an inkling we could return to the Moors. It might not be anytime soon, but readers will be satisfied with the ending, until the next adventure.

My Rating: Enjoy It (4.5 out of 5)!

Why You Need to Read: “In An Absent Dream”

Wayward Children, #4: In An Absent Dream

By: Seanan McGuire

Published: January 8, 2019

Genre: Fantasy

            This, then, was Katherine Victoria Lundy: pretty and patient and practical. Not lonely, because she had never really considered any way of being other than alone. Not gregarious, nor sullen, but somewhere in the middle, happy to speak when spoken to, happy also to carry on in silence, keeping her thoughts tucked quietly away. She was ordinary. She was remarkable, (1: A Very Ordinary Garden). 

            We’ve all asked the question: ‘How did ‘x’ come to be in existence?’ In our world, we have history lessons and oral tradition to teach us about historic moments and events, and changes in technology. In other worlds—in works of fiction—the audience receives the history as the narration continues explaining the scenario, the characters’ backstories, and—in the case of speculative fiction—how the world came to be. Throughout the Wayward Children series, readers have learned about the various worlds the travelers visited, and how Eleanor West’s Home For Wayward Children is a haven for these travelers. It makes you wonder how those who returned to our world readjusted in society before these schools existed. In An Absent Dream, the fourth book in the series, provides one infamous case.

            The protagonist in this story is Lundy, whom we met in Every Heart A Doorway. Everyone already knows how her life ends, but we’re given a look into her life—both with her family and in the Goblin Market. Katherine Victoria Lundy is the middle child in her family’s household. She is 6-years-old at the beginning of the story. She has an older brother, Daniel, who is 6 years her senior; and, her mother is pregnant with her 3rd child, which will be Lundy’s younger sister, Diana. However, Lundy isn’t Lundy yet, she is Katherine; it’s her birthday, and none of Katherine’s classmates are celebrating with her. The reason for this is because Katherine’s father is the principal at the school, which goes unnoticed by both parents. For another 2 years, Katherine is a model student, which isolates her even more. One day, 8-year-old Katherine is walking home from school when she finds a Door with the words: BE SURE. Well, Katherine is sure and she enters the world of the Goblin Market. There, Katherine meets “the Archivist,” who explains the rules and the ways of the Goblin Market; and, “Moon,” a girl around Katherine’s age who is a resident at the Goblin Market, who has trouble following the rules. The first thing Katherine learns there is NOT to use her actual name, but either an attribute or a family name. Thus, Katherine chooses to go by her last name, Lundy; and, Lundy is told she is not the 1st visitor to go by that name. Throughout her “trips” to the Goblin Market, Lundy grows into the person she was denied to be in her world (the story starts in 1962). Meanwhile, Lundy’s family cannot understand why she would choose to be anywhere else but with them, especially Lundy’s father. So, what does Lundy’s family do to her? They find ways to keep her from leaving them, even succumbing to enact guilt. This move begins a rift in Lundy as she tries to figure out a way to find “fair value” before the curfew.   

            The plot is a look back into Lundy’s early life—who can be viewed as a “tragic” character—and her childhood and her time in the Goblin Market. This is an intriguing view into how a child survives in “another world” with minimal adult guidance, which could be one of the actual dilemmas Lundy had to deal with as well, while remaining divided on which Home was her real one. The sad thing is Lundy was thriving in the Goblin Market for reasons her family was too blind to notice. There are 2 subplots and they are essential to the plot (and, the entire series). The first subplot regards the concept and the importance of the rules in each world. Throughout the series, readers learn which students haven’t returned Home due to the rules they broke, but there wasn’t too much context in their stories—except for Kade. Lundy is the first character who has to admit her choices to break the rules led to her permanent punishment (unlike Jill). The second subplot presents how and why schools like Eleanor West’s—remember, there are several others throughout our world—became the much-needed havens and fellowships travelers, especially children, never knew they needed. Lundy knew of 2 other travelers: Moon, who was already a permanent citizen of the Goblin Market; and, Franklin Lundy, Lundy’s father, who does everything in his power to stop his daughter from returning to the Goblin Market. Neither friend nor parent can give the guidance Lundy needs so badly. It makes you wonder what could have been if a school existed during Lundy’s childhood. It is obvious both subplots are necessary for the plot to develop throughout the story.

            The narrative in this story is told from Lundy’s point-of-view, but in 3rd person omniscient. This is because there are moments when the P.O.V. shifts away from Lundy—usually to her father—in order to fill in the smaller details of the story. The sequence is broken down into the events leading up to Lundy’s “trips” to the Goblin Market, particularly her first 3 visits. Each visit leads Lundy to staying at the Goblin Market for longer periods of time. However, it is the visits before the curfew, which receives the most attention. Lundy’s “trips” become more frequent, but for shorter visits, almost like they match Lundy’s hesitation instead of her heart. The narrative is a look back at the past, so it is NOT a flashback. This means most of the narration is told from Lundy’s stream-of-consciousness. And, because the narration leads to the end readers know is coming, Lundy is a reliable narrator.

            The style Seanan McGuire uses in In An Absent Dream is an intriguing one. The concept of the Goblin Market comes from the narrative poem of the same name by Christina Rossetti. The poem is about 2 sisters who meet goblins by the river encouraging all to “Come buy, come buy.” The synopsis of the poem is: one sister eats the fruit, while the other one does not. As time passes, the sister who ate the fruit begins to age unnaturally. This causes the other sister to go and buy some of the fruit to save her. The sister resists the temptation to eat the fruit, which saves her sister’s life. It is obvious the author took this children’s poem and retold it with the same dilemmas and the same morals. Seanan McGuire’s retelling of Goblin Market is easier to comprehend, but is just as much of a cautionary tale as the original poem. The mood in this story is the discord one’s desires can lead to within the individual, which is brought on by those closest to them. Once again, the illustrations done by Rovina Cai bring out the beauty in a world very few people know exist. 

            The appeal for In An Absent Dream have been positive. Not only was it nominated for a Hugo Award for Best Novella in 2020, but also it is one of the highest rated books in the Wayward Children series by readers on Goodreads and on other social media and (book) retail websites. This novella is an excellent addition to both the book series and the fantasy canon. I should mention that anyone who did enjoy this book because of the world of the Goblin Market should read both Goblin Market by Christina Rosetti and The Sisters of the Winter Wood by Rena Rossner. The latter is a historical fantasy novel with allusions to Goblin Market. After reading those, fans can move on to the next book in the series, Come Tumbling Down

            In An Absent Dream is a story so beautiful and tragic readers will be torn between wanting it to be real and wanting it to be a dream. This is my favorite book in the series next to Every Heart A Doorway. There are several reasons for this: the believable characters, the beauty of the Goblin Market, the split between family and where you belong, and the heart-wrenching end everyone knows is coming but doesn’t want it to happen. Not to mention, the reason and the importance of schools like Eleanor West’s for travelers in similar scenarios. Now, readers have a complete understanding of what these children really need: the desire to choose without any guilt. 

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!!!

Why You Need to Read…My Selections for Best Speculative Fiction Books of 2020

What. A. Year. It was a great year for stories—not necessarily publication—but a terrible year for everything else. While the pandemic brought about more time for some readers, I did NOT fall into that category. If anything, then the pandemic had me being more occupied, which brought about less time for reading. Don’t get me wrong, I still met my reading goal (100 books), but I’m going to have to change the way I do these end-of-the-year lists. I didn’t get to read or to finish reading all the books I wanted to read this year (I lost some time because I no longer had a long commute), but I read just enough books to compile this list. These books were released and read—by me—in 2020. 

#15: The Order of the Pure Moon Reflected in Water by Zen Cho

            This novella didn’t get the same recognition similar novellas received, and that’s a shame because this standalone work is entertaining and brilliant from start to end. The story follows a troupe of thieves for hire who are completing a job when they are recognized and have to escape, with a nun following them. From there, several hijinks and revelations ensue until the big reveal at the end leaves readers wondering whether or not this book should be a standalone. 

#14: Daughter from the Dark by Marina and Sergey Dyachenko

            This is a standalone novel, which serves as the English translated follow up to Vita Nostra. The story follows a DJ who saves a young girl from bullies, and by some hidden powers from the girl’s “family,” he becomes her legal guardian during her “stay” in “our world.” The girl is accompanied by a teddy bear and music strings, and her mission is to locate her missing brother while learning how to play the violin. However, the longer the girl stays, the stranger the world surrounding the DJ becomes until he is forced to behave like an adult—who is afraid of a teddy bear. 

#13: Wayward Children #5: Come Tumbling Down by Seanan McGuire

            Eleanor’s Home for Wayward Children sees the return of Jack, who has been betrayed by her twin sister, Jill. A few of the students embark on a quest—which is supposed to be forbidden—in order to save Jack from Jill. This story continues to look into how the children at the school continue to hope to return Home, while catching up with their former classmates who were able to do so. On top of this, the narration of present events continues to lay out the consequences to those who believe they can ignore the rules of the world. I can’t wait to read the next book in the series!

#12: The Legacy of the Mercenary Kings #1: The Kingdom of Liars by Nick Martell

            I didn’t know what to make of this debut novel. That is, until I read the first few chapters, and the title fits the story brilliantly. The story follows Michael Kingman, the younger son of David Kingman, who was executed for murdering the Crowned Prince. Living in exile with his older brother and sister, Michael is given the chance to reenter high society and to prove his father’s innocence. But, how is Michael going to complete these tasks when everyone is a liar, and several people want him dead?

#11: The Nine Realms: A Queen in Hiding, The Queen of Raiders, A Broken Queen, The Cerulean Queen by Sarah Kozloff

            Dr. Sarah Kozloff took her massive epic fantasy and gave it to readers as a quartet, so they could binge read the books without too long of a wait. The decision to present 4 “shorter” books instead of 1 huge one had me reflecting back to Tamora Pierce’s series. However, this series can be read by both teens and adults because the lead protagonist grows from girlhood (and exiled princess) to adulthood (and a queen). During the time, she has to learn how to fend for herself, avoid being recognized and captured, how to protect her kingdom by joining up with the rebel army, and using her “Talent” to reclaim the throne. The author gives an excellent balance between fantasy (magic) and reality (science) as readers are given a straightforward—as in no previous look back on what occurred in the last book—narration which allows for an enjoyable reading experience. 

#10: The House in the Cerulean Sea by T.J. Klune

            Believe it or not, this is the first book by the author that I’ve read. Even though this book is a fantasy story, I will argue that the elements of magic realism make the story more realistic. The protagonist is a social worker who works for an agency that deals with “unusual” children. These children either have special abilities or are of a magical species, and our society deems that all of these children must be “registered” and “observed” so that they will grow up to be “productive adults.” The protagonist is given an assignment to observe a house where several “unusual” children reside. And, it is through this assignment that the protagonist begins to see the children as children and not just the nature of their species. This is a brilliant story about foster children, prejudice and family. 

#9: Chronicles of the Bitch Queen #1: The Wolf of Oren-Yaro by K.S. Villoso

            What if you were caught in a precarious situation in another country? What if assassins and political powers were searching for you? What if you were the queen of your nation? How would you survive your ordeal? This book—a reprint of the author’s debut novel—presents readers with a realistic account of survival and being royal during a time of fragile establishment and foreign hostility. What happens when a queen is lured to another land only to be betrayed and left stranded there? It’s a good thing the queen knows how to use a sword.

#8: The Daevabad Trilogy #3: The Empire of Gold by S.A. Chakraborty

            Yes, this book is massive, but the story makes the pages go quicker. The last book in the trilogy takes place immediately where the last one leaves off. Nahri and Prince Ali find themselves far away from Daevabad as a rebellion and usurpation continues there. Under the rule of a new tyrant, Nahri and Ali must decide whether or not to save the empire and its magic. Meanwhile, Dara comes to terms with all of the decisions he’s made in his past and during his present as he determines whether or not loyalty outweighs being noble. This was a great ending to this Arabian Nightsinspired epic fantasy. 

#7: A Chorus of Dragons #3: The Memory of Souls by Jenn Lyons

            The 3rd book in this 5-book series—remember when I thought it was a trilogy? I’m so glad I was wrong!—has all of the characters from the first 2 books joining together in order to save the world from the “real threat.” All of the events from the previous books lead up to where all of the protagonists and the characters find themselves in, and the roles they are supposed to play in the near and the far future. Another prophecy is mentioned, another dragon is introduced, and ulterior motives are revealed. The question is—especially after THAT ending—what will the heroes do next? 

#6: The Black Iron Legacy #2: The Shadow Saint by Gareth Hanrahan

            I enjoyed this sequel to The Gutter Prayer—my #1 Favorite Speculative Fiction Book of 2019—and it’s an interesting book. One of the reasons for this is because of the new P.O.V. characters—and a few previous ones—the readers experience the events from. This book focuses on the aftermath of the end of the first book, and instead of magical forces, there are political conspiracies and familial backstabbing amongst all of the characters. Unfortunately, politics overshadow the real threat, which once again comes from the gods.

#5 (Tie): Ring Shout by P. Djèlí Clark

            This novella takes the history of a film which promoted racism—and revived the Ku Klux Klan—and added a supernatural element to it. There is the Klan, who terrorize Black Americans, and are human; and, there are the Ku Kluxes, supernatural beings who feed off of fear and hatred, and are only identified by those with the Sight. Because the Ku Kluxes look like White Americans, only the Black demon hunters are brave enough to fight them and to defend our world from them. However, what happens when the Ku Kluxes join the ranks of the KKK? 

#5 (Tie): Riot Baby by Tochi Onyebuchi

            This novella presents the horrors and the consequences of institutional racism in Modern America. The story follows a sister and a brother who are “victims” of racism from their early childhood. After realizing that there is no avoiding becoming a “statistic,” the siblings have to decide on whether or not to use their gifts in order to change their world for the better. 

#3: The Once and Future Witches by Alix E. Harrow

            This standalone novel is the follow up to the author’s debut novel. This time, instead of one female protagonist, there are three sisters. After several years apart, they are reunited under circumstances and a cause—the Women’s Suffrage Movement; and, it’s not just about the right to vote, but the right to use magic. This historical fantasy presents a throwback to Camelot, fairy tales, spells and symbolism as well as practices which brought about the Women’s Vote, the (first) Civil Rights Movement, and Labor Laws. This is a fitting story to mark what was happening one hundred years ago.           

#2: Bethel #1: The Year of the Witching by Alexis Henderson

            This debut novel immersed my attention and had me completing the book within 24 hours! This dark fantasy story presents the protagonist who is her community’s reminder of past sins and upcoming retributions. The author gives readers an amazing take on the hypocrisy surrounding religion, family, race, sex and leadership. The ending to this book has me excited for the upcoming sequel, which we will be getting in 2021!

#1: Between Earth and Sky #1: Black Sun by Rebecca Roanhorse

            There are times when the synopsis of a book isn’t enough to snag a reader’s interest, so the emphasis shifts to the book’s cover. And, what a cover! Even if you hadn’t read Rebecca Roanhorse’s The Sixth World series—which is a dystopian urban fantasy series—then reading this series—which is dark fantasy—will introduce readers what a talented storyteller the author is to all who must become familiar with her books. The novel starts with the past, jumps forward to the last moment within the narration, and then jumps back to the aftermath of the opening chapter. Readers get are presented with several characters from different backgrounds and positions, and where the Winter Solstice is a date in which something is about to happen and decisions have to be made before the moment—and, once they’re made, there is no going back. This book begins and ends the way you believe it will, which makes it all the more shocking and entertaining. Book 2 is expected sometime in the future, which will answer the question: What will happen next? 

            There were so many books that came out in 2020—miraculously—I didn’t get to finish reading them all! I want to read all of the books I missed this year and in previous years, but I want to be able to read all of the upcoming books (in the new year) as well. I’ll find a way to pull it off! Hopefully, this pandemic will end within the next several months—I’m not holding my hopes or my expectations too high—so some normalcy can return. Otherwise, here’s to another great year in reading. Which books of 2020 were your favorites?

Why You Need to Read…My Most Anticipated Speculative Fiction Books of 2020

2020 is coming and so are the books. Many of them are to be expected because they are follow-ups or sequels to previous books in a series. Others are either new or standalones books that have piqued our interests. Here is a short list of the books I’m excited to read in the new year (and, new decade). Note: if there is a book that is NOT listed here, then it is because either no release date has been announced, or I have not yet read the previous book(s) in that series. Also, keep in mind that intended release dates can change due to multiple reasons. This is based on the dates stated on the day this was posted. 

#1 The City We Became (The City #1) by N.K. Jemisin à March 26, 2020

            Many of us have been waiting for N.K. Jemisin to follow-up on her success of The Broken Earth Trilogy and we won’t have to wait much longer. This urban fantasy is a follow-up of the author’s short story, “The City Born Great,” and it appears to be an expansion of the “mythology” she mentioned in it. The focus is on New York City and its five protectors as they come together to protect the city from an ancient evil. As a New Yorker, I’m curious to see which aspects of City life the author decided to incorporate into her story. 

#2 The Network Effect (The Murderbot Diaries #5) by Martha Wells à May 5, 2020

            When it was announced that there would be a novel to continue The Murderbot Diaries series, I not only added the novel to my TBR list, but also made sure I was either able to claim an ARC of the book, or to preorder a copy of it! All we know of the plot so far is that Murderbot has to choose between saving his human friends and binge watching his favorite TV show. We already know what it’s going to do, and the story is going to be epic! I’m glad the author chose to continue this series!

#3 The Shadow Saint (The Black Iron Legacy #2) by Gareth Hanrahan à January 7, 2020

            This one shouldn’t surprise anyone. The Gutter Prayer was my favorite speculative fiction book of 2019, and the sequel, The Shadow Saint, has been on my TBR list since I started reading the first book in the series. The sequel takes place six months after the events in The Gutter Prayer. All we know is that the two warring factions—probably the ones from the first book—are competing against one another in search of a rumored weapon. It’s not clear whether or not any of the characters from the first book will appear in the second one, but if The Shadow Saint is anything like its predecessor, then we have nothing to worry about. 

#4 Daughter from the Dark by Marina & Sergey Dyachenko à February 11, 2020

            Vita Nostra was my favorite book of 2018, so you know I’m looking forward to reading this book by the husband and wife duo! This is a standalone novel is about a man who saves a 10-year-old girl from danger, who claims to be a music prodigy who is searching for her missing brother. Not sure whether or not the girl is a con artist, the man does everything he can in order to get the girl to leave, but every time he does, a “protector” thwarts him. All the while, darker forces threaten to separate the two before either of them can determine whether or not there’s a connection between them. 

#5 Ten Arrows of Iron (The Grave of Empires #2) by Sam Sykes à August 4, 2020

            Seven Blades in Black was my surprise read of 2019 and I’ve been anticipating the sequel since I finished it! Based on the synopsis, Sal is alone after the events of the previous book. However, she gains new purpose when she is asked to participate in a heist on the airship fleet, the Ten Arrows, in order to steal power for a mysterious patron. Things turn for the worse when Sal uncovers yet another conspiracy which may or may not with the death and the destruction of the world, again. If Ten Arrows of Iron is anything like its predecessor, then I already know it’s going to be fast-paced and full of action!   

#6 The Girl and the Stars (Book of the Ice #1) by Mark Lawrence à April 30, 2020

            The author is basing his new series in the same world as in the Book of the Ancestor Trilogy. Except now, readers will be transported to the Ice instead of a convent. Yaz is an ice triber who survives the harsh environment based on the ways of her people. However, she is separated from that life and everyone she knows and Yaz has to learn how to survive in a world she never knew existed. Fans and readers get to return to Abeth for a new story set in a world we only got a glimpse of before. 

#7 The Empire of Gold (The Daevabad Trilogy #3) by S.A. Chakraborty à June 30, 2020

            Daevabad has fallen to the rebels, unrest has erupted amongst the denizens, and magic has disappeared from the world. Meanwhile, both Nahri and Ali are safe in Cairo but decide to save their loved ones in the fallen kingdom. At the same time, Dara must confront his guilt while working alongside Banu Manizheh in order to bring some stability to the kingdom they’ve managed to overtake. The Empire of Gold is the final book in the author’s trilogy and we’re wondering who will survive the final fight for power within Daevabad. 

#8 The Burning God (The Poppy War #3) by R.F. Kuang à November 19, 2020

            There is no synopsis for this book, but here’s my hypothesis. The final book in The Poppy War Trilogy sees Rin struggling with the few friends she has left after more death and betrayal from both allies and enemies. However, she might have figure out the secret to the Empress’ power, but before she can do anything, she must face-off against the colonizers and those who betrayed her. 

#9 Legacy of Ash (Legacy Trilogy #1) by Matthew Wardà April 7, 2020 (Print)

            This debut novel focuses on three protagonists with different motivations must work together in order to save their country from a hostile empire. This is easier said than done, but are old hatreds and grudges worth it when their empire is about to fall to destruction? The eBook is available to purchase, but I know many are awaiting to read the printed format. 

#10 The Nine Realms by Sarah Kozloff à    

#1: A Queen in Hiding à January 21, 2020

#2: The Queen of Raiders à  February 18, 2020      

#3: A Broken Queen à  March 24, 2020

#4: The Cerulean Queen à   April 21, 2020

            Fantasy readers are in for a treat! The Nine Realms is a new series and both the author—who is making her debut—and the publisher—Tor Books—are releasing all four books within four consecutive months! Instead of waiting until after the author writes the next book in the series, each book will be released so that readers can enjoy the series—all 1,968+ pages of it—within a short time span. In other words, the time between each novel is more than enough time for readers to read and to process each one. The efforts of both the author and the publisher are appreciated immensely!

            The series is a fantasy bildungsroman and it follows Cérulia, Princess of Weirandale, who is starts off as an exiled and hunted orphan who is determined to do whatever it takes to reclaim the throne that is her birthright. Readers will get to experience the protagonist as she learns magic and how to fight; to participating in a battle against the invaders; to recovering from both visible and invisible scars caused by the war; to reclaiming her throne and establishing herself as a ruler and restoring order to the realm that was left in chaos. This journey sounds so promising that it’s no wonder the author and the publisher decided to release the books in consecutive months!  

#11 The Ranger of Marzanna (The Goddess War #1) by Jon Skovron à April 21, 2020

            Two siblings find themselves on opposing sides of allegiance to the Empire. After their father is murder by imperial soldiers, one will seek to destroy the Empire, while the other will strive to protect it. Sonya is a Ranger of Marzanna, an ancient sect of warriors and her brother, Sebastian, is the most powerful sorcerer in the world. What will happen when the siblings face-off against each other? 

#12 The Obsidian Tower (The Gate of Secrets #1) by Melissa Caruso à June 4, 2020

            The granddaughter of the ruler of a kingdom has broken magic. Although Ryx is mage-marked, all she can do is drain the life from everything she touches, making her place in society unstable. However, after she kills a visiting dignitary and activates a mysterious magical artifact, both by accident, she flees and meets up with a group of unlikely magical experts who are investigating the disturbances of the kingdom. Once, Ryx learns that her family is in danger, she risks everything to save them and to gain control of the same artifact she activated. The Obsidian Tower is the first book in a new series by the author of the Swords and Fire trilogy. 

#13 Call of the Bone Ships (The Tide Child Trilogy #2) by R.J. Barker à September 2020

            There is little to no information about this book and I had to confirm the rumored anticipated release date with the author. My hypothesis: the Tide Child continues its voyage into uncharted territory in order to determine whether or not the “sea dragons” are as endangered as everyone else believes them to be. At the same time, the crew must fend off any suspicious and curious ships whom decide to follow the path of their voyage. 

#14 The Fires of Vengeance (The Burning #2) by Evan Winter à July 16, 2020

            All that is known about this sequel to The Rage of Dragons is that it takes place after the events in the first book. I’m going to make a hypothesis and say that the story follows Tau as he continues his path towards vengeance for his father’s death and the betrayal of his warrior brothers. The Fires of Vengeance is a continuation of the war between two nations, but loyalties have altered since the end of Book One. 

#15 The Memory of Souls (A Chorus of Dragons #3) by Jenn Lyons à August 25, 2020

            I haven’t started to read The Name of All Things, the second book in A Chorus of Dragons Trilogy, but I know I’ll be done with it in time to read The Memory of Souls, the last book in the same trilogy. Kihrin has managed to convince everyone of the plans of his enemies to release the dark god, thus ending the world. There might be a way to prevent this from happening, but at the cost of all of the immortals. However, will Kihrin have to make the ultimate sacrifice in order to save the world? Is he willing to do that? 

#16 The Unspoken Name (The Serpent Gates #1) by A.K. Larkwood à February 11, 2020

            If you were supposed to die, but were then given the opportunity to live, then would you take it? Csorwe was supposed to be a sacrifice for the gods, but a mage gives him the chance to live, with some conditions. All he has to do is become a thief, train as a spy and an assassin, topple an empire and help the mage reclaim his seat of power. What’s the problem? Well, it turns out that Csorwe was supposed to be sacrificed for a reason; and the gods never forget. 

#17 The Wolf of Oren-Yaro (Chronicles of the Bitch Queen #1) by K.S. Villoso à February 18, 2020

            Queen Talyien was a hero of the War of the Wolves and set to marry the son of her father’s rival. Unfortunately, he vanishes before their reign can begin and the fragile peace crumbles. Years later, the Queen receives a message and she crosses the sea towards the meeting place. She survives an assassination attempt and now must find a way home while surviving through a hostile land. The Wolf of Oren-Yaro is the debut novel of a new epic fantasy series by this up-and-coming author. 

#18 The Protectorate #2 by Megan E. O’Keefe à August 18, 2020

            The sequel to Velocity Weapon takes place after the events in that novel. After the truth of Sanda’s imprisonment abroad Bero—whom escape from both Nazca and the Protectorate—she and Tomas flee before she can become a pawn of the greater powers. All they have are coordinates to a dead gate with no way to survive there. Unsure of what to do, Sanda and Tomas might have to plead to the only group willing to assist them, Nazca.

#19 Docile by K.M. Szpara à March 3, 2020

            Dociline is a drug. It is given to Dociles when they serve out their contracts of servitude to those who own them. However, there are negative side effects to this drug and for some reason only Elisha is willing to avoid the drug. When his contract of servitude is purchased by the family of the creators of the drug, Elisha refuses to take it. This puts him at odds against Alexander Bishop III, who believes he can turn Elisha into a Docile without the drug. This story is a parable about sex, love, corruption and capitalism.  

#20 Strange Exit by Parker Peevyhouse à January 14, 2020

            Lake, the seventeen-year-old protagonist in this story, seems to be the only one who knows that the world she and everyone is living in is in fact a simulation. For some unknown reason, after a nuclear event everyone’s bodies have remained in stasis and their minds are trapped within a shared virtual reality all aboard a spaceship. The only way to get off the ship is to remind all of the passengers that they are living in a virtual reality. Lake is accompanied by Taren, but he doesn’t share the same views about saving everyone as she does and soon they are both of them are in a race to locate the heart of the simulation so that everyone can get off the ship dead or alive. 

Additional Books to Lookout For:

Come Tumbling Down (Wayward Children #5) by Seanan McGuire à January 7, 2020

Stormsong (The Kingston Cycle #2) by C.L. Polk à February 11, 2020

The Killing Fog (The Grave Kingdom #1) by Jeff Wheeler à March 1, 2020

Race the Sands: A Novel by Sarah Beth Durst à April 21, 2020

Aurora Burning (The Aurora Cycle #2) by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff à May 5, 2020

The Only Good Indians by Stephen Graham Jones à May 19, 2020

The Order of the Pure Moon Reflected in Water by Zen Cho à June 23, 2020

Ashes of the Sun (Burningblade & Silvereye #1) by Django Wexler à July 21, 2020

The Invisible Life of Addie La Rue by V.E. Schwab à October 6, 2020

Between Earth and Sky (Anasazi Series #1) by Rebecca Roanhorse à TBA 2020

            These are some of the many books I plan to read in 2020. There are so many other books to expect—some to be released in 2020 and others beyond 2020—but, these are the ones I’m going to start reading, immediately. As for the obvious anticipated books that were not listed here, don’t worry I plan on making my way through the previous books in those series so that I can read the follow-ups as soon as they are released. Which books are you excited for the most in 2020 Are there any other buzzworthy books to lookout for?