Why You Need to Read: “Darkdawn”

The Nevernight Chronicle: #3: Darkdawn

By: Jay Kristoff

Published: September 3, 2019

Genre: Fantasy, Grimdark, Historical Fantasy, Folklore

NOTE: This review contains spoilers from both Nevernight and Godsgrave.

            Goddess, if only we’d known what she’d become…(Chapter 33, Wellspring). 

            Darkdawn is the stunning conclusion to The Nevernight Chronicle. Jay Kristoff gives his readers a blood-soaked conclusion to his antiheroine that rivals “The Bride” from Kill Bill and Kratos from God of War. Mia Corvere and her vengeance concludes in Darkdawn, and the author delivers on everything he promised his readers and gives them even more.

            Mia Corvere has transformed from an assassin of the Red Church to a gladiator of the Falcons of Remus to the most infamous murderer in the Itreyan Republic. While she was killing her family’s enemies, she made a startling discovery and acted without thinking. Her brother, Jonnen, has been alive the entire time and has been raised as Consul Julius Scaeva’s son. More about Scaeva’s deception is revealed to Mia and she realizes that her identity was a lie as well. As she comes to terms with this new information, Mia learns that she has been chosen to “seek the Crown of the Moon.” It turns out the gods and the goddesses of the Itreyan Republic are as real as the magic in that world. Mia’s power of a darkin is strongest during Nevernight—which, is coming again soon—and, when the Mother Goddess—Niah, the Maw, the Mother of Night, and Our Lady of Blessed Murder—is strong enough to get her vengeance on Aa—the Father of Light, the Everseeing—her husband. Mia is powerful enough to assist the Maw with her path for revenge. However, Mia has accomplished her tasks and wishes to put as much distance between herself and the Itreyan Republic as possible. But first, Mia has to complete purging the Red Church who has sent ALL of their assassins after her. Meanwhile, Mercurio—Mia’s mentor and foster father—is a captive in the Red Church to use as bait to lure Mia Corvere to them. At the same time, Mercurio learns of the role he’s to play in the Mother’s plan, and it’s as shocking to the readers as it is to him! Throughout the story, we see Mia being split between keeping her brother and her friends safe and killing Consul Scaeva once and for all and following the path the Mother has laid before her. Mia deals with all of these revelations the only way an 18-year-old can…by lashing out; and, Mia’s method of lashing out involves killing a lot of people. Mia is now the most lethal assassin in the history of the Itreyan Republic and the true faith of the Maw expects Mia to fulfill her final task. Will Mia accept the task of the Mother? 

            The plot in Darkdawn is the conclusion to Mia’s life. Readers have known since Nevernight that Mia Corvere would die. The question was how and why. Mia’s quest for revenge now includes the Red Church and anyone Consul Scaeva sends after her. On top of that the Mother (darkness) and the Father (sunlight) are preparing to meet each other and to end their “spousal disagreement.” Mia has to battle gods and goddesses at the same time she is battling mortals. The plot develops as Mia and Mercurio learn more about the history of the Red Church and the darkin. As for the history of the gods and the goddesses, all of those footnotes throughout the trilogy was information as to what would occur eventually. The immortals—like all mythologies—have foresaw their Ragnarök and Mia is to play a very critical role in the end of the Itreyan Republic. Will the gods allow Mia to defeat them? Along with this subplot is the subplot of Mia’s reunion with Jonnen and the relationship she struggles to build with him. These subplots are crucial to the conclusion of The Nevernight Chronicle and they take over the plot of Darkdawn as the story continues. The plot starts with and ends with Mia Corvere. 

            The narrative in Darkdawn is a continuation of Nevernight and Godsgrave until the final part of Darkdawn (Book 4, The Ashes of Empires). From there, the story seems to follow a stream-of-consciousness in the present tense, until it shifts back to the 3rd limited point-of-view. This narration allows readers to follow the actions of Mia, Ashlinn, Jonnen, Mercurio, and other characters as all is revealed throughout the Itreyan Republic. Mia—even with her darkin abilities—cannot be everywhere at once, so readers get the chance to learn how all of these characters are feeling with their situation and what will come to pass. While readers might not like certain characters, their narratives are objective and essential to the story that is being told. The footnotes remain informative and hilarious but are just as vital to the story as the world-building. Everything converges within the narrative. 

            The style Jay Kristoff uses continues in the final book in this trilogy. The events of the past are told in italics, the darkin’s dialogue are told using various font sizes, and the footnotes continue to explain Itreya’s history and culture. That last part is crucial to the narrative because it can be argued that the history and the culture was the real story being told in The Nevernight Chronicle. For example, the “author” of the entire chronicle is revealed, and once readers get over their shock, they will realize that it makes a lot of sense. On top of that readers are reminded that books still enact a sense of fear whether or not it’s the reader or the people mentioned within it. Jay Kristoff reveals the actual story he is telling in his trilogy, the anger of a goddess and the revenge she is waiting to enact on her husband. Similar to how Mia wants vengeance for her family, Niah wants revenge against Aa. The clues were in the titles: Nevernight, Godsgrave, and Darkdawn. The author wasn’t only telling Mia’s story, but also creating his own mythology about the world he created: the gods and the goddesses, how they created the world, and the religion that came out of it as well. The mood in Darkdawn is the coming end of an empire, a cult and its followers, and the protagonist. Readers are familiar with the saying, “tear it all down and begin anew.” Usually this statement comes out of the mouth of a madman; however, in the case of the Itreyan Republic—similar to the Roman Empire—there is so much corruption and greed that the end was going to happen sooner or later (I’m not a historian). The tone of this novel follows the idiom: “the sins of the father shall be visited upon the sons.” The actions of Mia and Jonnen’s parents are reaped by the siblings. At the same time, the actions of the gods affect the mortals who worship them. And yet, the same emotions are felt by mortals and by immortals alike. 

            The appeal surrounding Darkdawn will be a positive one. I received an ARC of this book and Jay Kristoff gives a satisfying ending to this creative and bloody trilogy. Fans of fantasy and grimdark will enjoy this story. Readers of historical fiction will appreciate the parallels (and the research) to the Roman Empire. And, folklore enthusiasts and experts will love how the author reminds his audience of the source of magic and faith found throughout the trilogy. Darkdawn concludes the way it does as mentioned in the beginning of Nevernight.

            Darkdawn is the action-driven end to a fast-paced trilogy. Mia Corvere’s life story ends as it began, with blood and death. Readers will cringe at the death count, will mourn the characters who die, and won’t be able to stop reading until the end. Fans will complete The Nevernight Chronicle and be more than satisfied with its conclusion. Mia Corvere is one of the best antiheroines I’ve ever read. Thank you Jay Kristoff for sharing her story with us! 

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!!!

Why You Need to Read: “Godsgrave”

The Nevernight Chronicle: Book Two: Godsgrave

By: Jay Kristoff

Published: September 5, 2017

Genre: Fantasy, Grimdark, Historical Fiction

            Ashlinn sighed, her temper fraying. “You have no fucking idea what’s going on here, do you? I know you, Mia. Do you have any idea what the Red Church actually is? Do you think they’re ever going to let you kill Scaeva when he pays their wages?”

            Mia felt the consul’s name like a fist in her belly. 

            “You’re full of shit.”

            “Why do you think Scaeva isn’t dead already?”(Chapter 10, Secrets). 

            Godsgrave—the follow up to Nevernight—is an action-packed fantasy story from beginning to end. Conspiracies are uncovered and secrets are revealed, and characters grow more into themselves. Mia Corvere’s quest for revenge continues when she learns more about the Red Church and the politics of The Republic of Itreya. Jay Kristoff not only delivers an amazing sequel to his readers, but also gives us his take on the Gladiator Games, which are based on the ones from Ancient Rome. 

            Mia Corvere is now a Blade—an assassin—for the Red Church. Thus, she is closer to achieving her quest for vengeance; or, she would be if she hadn’t uncovered a conspiracy within the Red Church that includes her family. Curious to learn more about this connection, she goes undercover by selling herself to one of the noble families—similar to the one she grew up in—as a gladiator. Mia not only has to survive and to learn how to fight within these games, but also must navigate her way into the inner circle of the elite. Mia makes new allies, works with her darkin (shadow) companions, and works with a frenemy. Mia realizes that if she had continued living the life as a Justicus’ daughter it would not have equated to a happy life. At the same time, she learns more about why her parents rebelled against The Republic of Itreya. All the while, Mia learns how to fight as a gladiator, which is its own style and not like how she learned to fight at the Red Church. This is Mia’s coming-of-age story in which she sees everything for what it actually is and how to adapt to this new knowledge, just like everyone else goes through while growing up. Mia and all of the characters she interacts with are as complex as her. 

            The plot is straightforward; Mia continues her path to avenge her family. She’s closer to that goal now she’s a Blade for the Red Church. However, when she’s told not to pursue her target, Mia begins to question the operations within the order. Mia decides to go rogue and to continue her quest by selling herself as a slave to a gladiatorial collegium in order to get closer to Consul Scaeva. There she learns how to fight as a gladiator and how deep conspiracies run. The subplot is Mia learning the hows and the whys of her government and the roles her parents had in it before the rebellion. Both the plot and the subplot are linked in that Mia learns some hard truths about the life she thought she had and lived. This turn of events could alter the way Mia carries out the rest of her plans.

            The narrative in Godsgrave continues from what it was in Nevernight. The events of the past lead up to the events in the present. The difference here is that the narration is in the 3rdperson omniscient point-of-view. Readers want to know what is happening with the other characters when Mia is not around, and the author gives that to us with that method of narration. The world-building continues in the second book through the footnotes, which remain informative and hilarious. Jay Kristoff’s world continues to grow through his narration. 

            The style continues as it started in the first book. Remember, this story is supposed to be one huge chronicle, so the style won’t change, which is a good thing because changing the style would change the way the story is being told and we don’t want that to happen. So, the events of the past are written in italics, the darkins’ dialogue are told using smaller font sizes, and the footnotes continue to explain Iterya’s history and culture. The mood, once again, lets readers know that this world is not a caring one; even the elite mistreat each other. The tone illustrates how an individual could react to such mistreatment; and, it is not good. 

            Godsgrave is the follow up that fans and readers crave for from a sequel. The appeal surrounds how the story and the plot develop through character growth and world expansion. Jay Kristoff succeeds in providing a perfect continuation of this trilogy. It’s safe to assume the same will happen in Darkdawn, the final book in the trilogy. 

            Godsgrave is the perfect transition from Nevernight to the point where you forget that you’re reading two separate books. The theme of doing the wrong thing for the right reason continues in this narrative and in many of the characters. Fans will not be disappointed with this sequel! Mia Corvere’s journey continues to grasp our attention!

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!!!