Why You Need to Read: “The House of Always”

A Chorus of Dragons, #4: The House of Always

By: Jenn Lyons                                                                       

Published: May 11, 2021                                                        

Genre: Fantasy                                                                                             

Thank you Tor for sending me an eARC of this book. I listened to excerpts of the audiobook, too.

Note: There are a few spoilers from the first three books in A Chorus of Dragons series. 

            After I have my answers. Time moves differently here. Only seconds will have passed when we return. There’s no need to hurry. There’s no point, (3: Secret Plans, Teraeth’s reaction).

            The beginning of the end has begun in this series. The climax occurred at the end of the last book—The Memory of Souls—yet the consequences of the actions and the choices in the previous chronicle must play out before the story can reach its conclusion. The House of Always is that book in A Chorus of Dragons; and A LOT happens before the story can begin to end. 

            If you believed the Dramatis Personae was long in the previous book, then be ready for even more callbacks in this one. Thanks to Senera, Kihrin D’Mon, Janel Thernanon, Tereath and Thurvishar D’Lorus reunite with Galen and Sheloran D’Mon, Qown, Kalindra Milligreest, Talea, Xivan and Talon. They all “meet up” after the battle that took place in the previous book in order to discuss their recent activities, the latest threat to Quur, and the upcoming threat(s) to the entire world. The last, of course, involves both Relos Var and Vol Karoth; so, what’s the plan? Each character has been busy with their own tasks, then—through magic—they find themselves inside an unusual place where they have a lot of time to sought through all of their thoughts—and those of their adversaries. 

            There are 2 plots in this story, and they involve 2 current conflicts. The first plot involves Kihrin’s “plans” for confronting Vol Karoth, which is easier said than done. The second plot delves into the current threat to Quur, which is something none of the protagonists or the main characters know anything about; or, do they? These plots are linked due to the most obvious reason, that 1 dilemma has to be resolved before the other one can be confronted. Meanwhile, there are several subplots within the story, and they are ALL relevant and essential to the plots of the story. All of the missions, the tasks, and the memories of ALL of the characters are linked to the ongoings throughout the rest of the Quuros Empire and the potential way to save it. 

            Once again, the narrative in this book is different from the narratives in the previous books. That being said, by now readers of this series should be familiar with the author’s narrative style. There are 2 Parts in this book; and, while the 1st 2 chapters in Part I and all of Part II are told in the present, the remainder of the narrative jumps back-and-forth amongst memories, flashbacks, previous lives, and streams-of-consciousness of ALL of the characters! In fact, a handful of other characters reemerge in this book. Which ones, and why? There are numerous P.O.V. chapters and passages which follows ALL of the characters. However, Kihrin’s point-of-view is the only one told in 1st person. The rest of the characters’ P.O.V.s are in 3rd person limited. There is a reason for this narration, and it is presented as it progresses. This narrative style allows for further development of the plots, the characters, and the world-building. And, believe it or not, the characters are reliable narrators, and their narratives can be followed easily. 

            The style Jenn Lyons uses for The House of Always can be argued as it being an additional buildup before the finale in the last book in this series. The final battle in the war is approaching, and the Dramatis Personae must decide which side they are on. Unfortunately, neutrality is no longer an option, so a decision has to be made. Not to mention, “the plan” must be finalized and agreed upon by EVERYONE. The style presented by the author reminds the readers what is at stake as the series approaches its end. The mood in this novel is ominous. All of the characters know what’s coming, and they must remain vigilant—which is the tone in this novel—as the final battle draws near. Once again, the readers can refer to the maps, the glossary, and the appendices for whenever they need to consult any information.     

            The appeal for The House of Always have been positive. Readers and fans who read through this book in the series gave it high ratings (4- & 5-stars). This is the book in which all of the pieces and the subplots from the previous books reemerge in this one, right before the series reaches its dénouement. This epic fantasy series continues to be compared to ones written by George R.R. Martin, Brandon Sanderson, and other authors who write similar books in this subgenre. To fantasy fans and readers who are still indecisive on whether or not to read this series, DO IT! If you’re worried about remembering all of the characters, then know that their stories continue throughout the series. If you’re concerned about all of the plots and the subplots, then take notes (I do). If you’re worried about forgetting what happens in all of the books leading up to the last book in the series—The Discord of Gods—then, now is the time either to re-read the previous books in the series, or to join (or to create) a group for a read along of this series! You are running out of reasons for NOT reading this series!

            The House of Always is a unique story that gears up readers for the series’ conclusion. You might wonder as to whether or not the narrative style leads to an essential part of the plot, and it does that and so much more. All of the elements within this series begins to end as the story and the characters’ fates gets closer to it. Now, we must wait until 2022 to learn who survives the apocalypse. 

My Rating: Enjoy It (4.5 out of 5). 

TV Episode Review: “His Dark Materials”: “Æsahættr”

            The season finale for Season Two opens with the witches talking about the attack from the Specters. Will and Lyra are with the witches as they all agree that they should leave Cittàgazze right after they find Will’s father. Meanwhile, Ruta Skadi overhears a group of creatures talking about the army Lord Asriel is building up and what that means for them. It turns out, a similar war occurred millennia ago, but the Authority was victorious. They say that without the Æsahættr, Asriel will lose the war. 

            Lyra and Will talk about their few—or, lack of—friends from their worlds and early childhoods. Both Lyra and Will admit being around each other has led to some changes in themselves for the better. Will is beginning to understand everything his mother told him about his father while growing up without him. 

            Mrs. Coulter and her daemon continue to wander through the city of Cittàgazze, which is now deserted—the children have returned to the mountains to be reunited with their parents (which doesn’t happen in the books)—and she finds more clues to her daughter’s whereabouts. She comes across one of the witches, and Mrs. Coulter tortures the witch to learn of Lyra’s location and her role in the upcoming events—which is why the Magisterium is targeting her. Mrs. Coulter believes she has a reason to protect her daughter.  

            Dr. Mary Malone escorts the children back to their parents before continuing onward with her quest. Dr. Malone continues to consult her books—both reference and spiritual—as she determines where she should go next. Blue flower petals keep appearing wherever she goes. 

            Ruta Skadi and Serafina Pekkala discuss what Ruta has learned about Asriel’s war. While they agree Lyra is the child of the prophecy, they realize the Authority could win the war again, so they go their separate ways hoping to meet up again during the Great War. Meanwhile, Serafina gets called to help another ally. This leaves Lyra and Will alone with one witch. Then, Will leaves. 

            Lee Scoresby and Doctor Stanislaus Grumman—a.k.a. Jopari, a.k.a. Colonel John Parry—survive the attack on the balloon, but they can no longer fly in it. The Magisterium soldiers are gaining ground, and the two travelers hurry to find the children. Lee and Jopari flee from the Magisterium until they have no choice but to hold them off for as long as they can. Lee Scoresby stays behind to fight while Jopari continues to end his search for the Bearer. This heartbreaking end is straight from the books, Lee and Hester have their last moments together knowing it’ll be worth it—for Lyra. 

            Will answers the calling which leads him straight to his father. Dr. Grumman cannot believe his teenaged son is the Bearer. Will cannot believe his father has a daemon. This reunion while different—and brief—in the books, is more meaningful and more heartfelt in this episode. They catch up on everything: Will’s mother, John’s travels, Will’s travels, the Subtle Knife, the Great War, etc. Then, the last soldier from the Magisterium appears and takes aim. 

            The episode ends with Seraphina Pekkala giving Lee Scoresby his last rites and Will burying his father. Lord Asriel makes his manifesto to the Angels for wanting to go to war; and, they stand with Asriel. Mrs. Coulter reunites with Lyra and takes her away from her allies. Unfortunately, Mrs. Coulter has Lyra and Pantalaimon drugged and locked inside a trunk. During Lyra’s unconsciousness, she hears the voice of a friend. 

            In all, this is one of the best episodes of Season Two. The season finale almost matched the last few chapters in The Subtle Knife to a tee. Yes, there are more questions viewers will want answered, but overall all of the plots and the subplots were wrapped up to where they had to be, and the presentation made it clear the Æsahættr episode ended the way it had to. I’m looking forward to Season Three.

My Rating: 9.5 out of 10.

TV Episode Review: “Deadly Class: Sink with California”

Note: There are some minor spoilers in this review. You have been warned. 

This season finale is separated into two parts. One, being Marcus and his crew invading Chester’s stronghold in order to stop him and his crew, and to retrieve Chico’s body. And two, Master Lin running from the Cartel with his daughter in tow. Marcus’ storyline follows the graphic novels, while Master Lin’s storyline allows viewers and fans to learn more about the Headmaster’s convictions. 

Marcus and his friends—minus Willie—attack the house but learn quickly that Chester and his crew are formidable forces. The fight scenes and the dialogue are straight from the graphic novel. However, Chester’s monologue with his camcorder allows Marcus and viewers to learn more about him…before he dies. Chester reiterates how society is to blame for his actions and his lifestyle (the same B.S.); yet, Marcus tells him that’s no reason to take his frustrations on other people. Ironically, when Chester is killed by one of his “friendly” dogs, it is safe to say that Chester’s notions got him chewed up by his same philosophy. 

The fighting isn’t just between Marcus and Chester, Maria and Saya have some words and strikes against each other about their actions and feeling towards Marcus. Maria still hasn’t realized how much her friends are risking because of her actions. Saya—while admitting to sleeping with Marcus—feels she doesn’t have to explain herself to someone as selfish as Maria. While this sounds like typical adolescent girls fighting over a boy, it is important to know Saya and Maria were brought to King’s Dominion for a reason. Saya tells Maria that she still hasn’t figured out what she’s supposed to do and decides to leave Maria to figure it out by herself. But first, she and Marcus will have to escape the Cartel.

Meanwhile, Master Lin continues to feel the wrath of the Cartel. Now, this doesn’t happen in the graphic novels, but it is interesting to see how and why King’s Dominion is run the way it is, and to learn more about any potential relatives Master Lin may or may not have. This storyline is obvious, Master Lin and his daughter run to avoid gunshots, Master Lin manages to fight off those on foot, and father and daughter make it back to the school, where his sister, Master Gao, notices the errors of her brother’s actions. Master Gao does what her brother should have done, send his daughter to the “Temple” for her training. Now, this choice is a reminder to what happened to both Maria and Saya when they were the same age as Master Lin’s daughter. However, Master Lin should have taken more precautions in protecting his daughter by training her himself. What happens to Master Lin and Master Gao at King’s Dominion will remain a mystery until Season 2—if there is one.

For viewers who enjoyed Sink with Californiaand are curious to the ending—where Chico’s father meets Maria and Marcus at Chester’s stronghold—then I should let you know that that does occur in the graphic novel. However, I won’t tell you what happens next. You’ll either have to read the series, or wait for the next season. As for Willie, I have no idea what’s going to happen to him.

This season final offers the end of the plot of Marcus attending and adjusting at King’s Dominion School of the Deadly Arts. Marcus made friends with several of his classmates, and they’ve entertained themselves by traveling to places any adolescent would go to if given the chance and killing people while they were at it. Marcus managed to end his feud with Chester and can go back to being a student and not a fearful homeless kid. Unfortunately, life doesn’t work out the way we want them to, and Marcus should know that better than anyone else. And, with the two cliffhangers, all we can do is wait and see how Marcus will survive these next obstacles.

Note:A review of Season One will be available soon.