Why You Need to Read: “Grey Sister”

Book of the Ancestor: Book Two: Grey Sister

By: Mark Lawrence

Published: April 3, 2018

Genre: Fantasy, Grimdark, Sequel

            “You’re powerful Nona, and you’ve come into your power at an early age. The understanding that power corrupts is an idea older than the language we repeat it in. All of us in positions that afford authority over others are susceptible, be we high priests, prime instigators, even abbesses.”

            “Or emperors,” Nona said.

            The abbess winced. “Some truths are better left implied, dear,” (Chapter 17).

            Sequels and other follow ups to their predecessors work well when the events that occurred beforehand are addressed AND the action picks up where it left off. In addition, both the plot development and the character development must continue to show growth in order for the story to remain realistic, and to keep the attention of the reader(s). Mark Lawrence achieves all of this in Grey Sister, the Second Book of the Ancestor.

            The second book in the trilogy has two protagonists: Nona Grey, who is now around 14 years-old and just reached Mystic Class; and Abbess Glass, the Reverend Mother and Headmistress at the Convent of Sweet Mercy. From these protagonists, readers are able to gain knowledge of the on goings of everything happening at the Convent. Nona is coming into her powers and her abilities and is dealing with the consequences of her actions from her time in Grey Class. At the same time, Abbess Glass continues her task of running the Convent and continuing her task of exposing corruption inside and outside of the Convent. More is at stake for both female protagonists as both the Emperor and the Inquisition continue to meddle in the affairs of the Church. All of the other novices: Ara, Darla, Ruli, Jula, and Zole, and the nuns: Wheel, Apple, Kettle, Pan, Rose, Tallow, and Rail know that more is happening outside of the Convent than the Emperor is willing to admit. And, once again, Nona meets up with a few of her former “cage mates,” who have grown into their abilities as well. Everyone is preparing for a war that is inevitable. Nona must endure the obstacles and the hardships in order to graduate from Mystic Class. Abbess Glass must use all of her wisdom and her connections to keep everyone safe, including the “Chosen One” and her “Shield.”

            The plot for Grey Sister is a continuation from Red Sister. Nona and her friends and classmates continue with their classes and the nuns continue their work inside and outside of the Convent. All of this occurs after the betrayals and the heartbreaks from the last two years. These events prompt the identity of the “Chosen One” to be revealed, which brings a motley crowd of zealots and doubters alike. At the same time, neither the noble families, nor the nuns have forgotten the efforts of one noble family’s continued plans to kill Nona. Nona is struggling with her classes due to the long-term “consequence” of the attack on her life. Through it all, Nona grows stronger and more powerful to the delight of her peers and to the horror of her enemies. If Nona wishes to remain at the Convent of Sweet Mercy and to stay alive, then she must find a way to navigate herself through her trials. The subplot of the “Chosen One” is growing and merging into the plot of Nona’s education and the significance of the 4 tribes that traveled to Abeth.

            Once again, the narrative is limited omniscient narration, meaning the readers and the protagonists know what is being experienced at that moment through the character’s point-of-view. Unlike Red Sister, the narrative in Grey Sister is told in real-time through the P.O.V.s of both Nona and Abbess Glass. Thus, these stream-of-consciousness narrations are reliable and can be followed by readers easily. It should be mentioned that the present narration of Grey Sister starts with Chapter 2. Chapter 1 picks up with the cliffhanger from Red Sister, and the Prologue provides a continuation of the action first introduced in the Prologue in Red Sister. Since Grey Sister’s narration is told in the present, any events of the past that is mentioned proves to be a revelation to both the characters and the readers. This is because what gets revealed demonstrates that everything that is, has been, and will continue to happen is bigger and more grievous than anyone at the Convent of Sweet Mercy could imagine. 

            The style Mark Lawrence uses in Grey Sister is a continuation of how prophecy is exploited through means of distraction. Those involved directly with the prophecy want nothing more than to be left alone and to live their lives as “normal” individuals. Some hopefuls wish for the “divine” powers of the “Chosen One” to work miracles for them only to be left disappointed with this notion. Then, there are those who use the prophecy as a way to fulfill their agendas, typically political ones. And, if the prophecy of the “Chosen One” is a distraction, then the political agendas of several noble families, including the Royal Family, serves as the knowledge that no one wants to admit is the issue: war is coming. In other words, religion is exploited in order to distract everyone from the politics of society. This is the mood found within Grey Sister; and, the tone is how the truth—surrounding both religion and politics—is revealed and the reactions and the consequences of it. There are neither winners, nor losers, yet everyone continues to believe whatever they want to believe in. 

            The appeal of Grey Sister is as positive as Red Sister. Fans of the first book had just as many praises for its sequel. This is because the sequel continues to build and to develop the characters, the plot, the world-building, and the action. Not only will readers want to re-read this book (to search for clues and Easter Eggs), but also to continue recommending this series to other readers, all while waiting to read Holy Sister, the third and final book in the series. 

            Grey Sister is an amazing sequel to Red Sister. This is because there is an expansion of the world and further development of both the plot and the characters. At the same time, the events and the revelations from the first book play a critical role that cannot be overlooked. The story is as immersive as the action is entertaining. Mark Lawrence’s novel is a must-read for fans of both fantasy and grimdark.

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!

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Why You Need to Read…My Selections for Best Speculative Fiction Books of 2019…So Far

We are halfway through 2019 and this year’s speculative fiction books have been both enjoyable and bountiful. Most of the books I’ve read so far this year have been amazing, and I still have A LOT of books in my TBR pile to go through. Like you, I’m an ardent reader and I’ll read just about anything I can get my hands on and has an interesting story. I’ve enjoyed novels, novellas, short stories across various genres of literature. If you’re interested in knowing some of the 51 books I’ve read between January 1stand June 30th2019, then please check out my Goodreads page here: https://www.goodreads.com/Misty306

            I’ve been trying to keep up with both ARCs, and the long list of nominations for this year’s Literary Awards as part of my Reading Award Challenge 2019. I knew it would be harder than it sounded, but I’ve read (and still reading) a lot of amazing books that I wouldn’t have done so otherwise. I suggest that you read a few of the numerous nominations for any of the 2019 SFF Awards. 

That being said, I wanted to point out some of speculative fiction books that were released in 2019 that I’ve enjoyed the most, so far. These are books I recommend you read, especially if you’re a fan of this genre of literature like I am. And, just so you know, these are books that I’ve read and finished between the 1sthalf of 2019. 

These are my Top Ten Picks in no particular order:

The Winter of the Witch (Winternight Trilogy #3) by Katherine Arden

The Wolf in the Whale by Jordanna Max Brodsky

In An Absent Dream (Wayward Children #4) by Seanan McGuire

Uncanny Collateral (Valkyrie Collections #1) by Brian McClellan

Seven Blades in Black (The Grave of Empires #1) by Sam Sykes

A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World by C.A. Fletcher

Aurora Rising (The Aurora Cycle #1) by Amie Kaufman & Jay Kristoff

An Illusion of Thieves (Chimera #1) by Cate Glass

Her Silhouette, Drawn in Water by Vylar Kaftan

Sisters of the Fire (Blood and Gold #2) by Kim Wilkins

Right now, I’m currently reading (released in 2019):

Broken Veil (Harbinger #5) by Jeff Wheeler

Velocity Weapon (The Protectorate #1) by Megan E. O’Keefe

One Word Kill (Impossible Times #1) by Mark Lawrence

Holy Sister (Book of the Ancestor #3) by Mark Lawrence

The Dragon Republic (The Poppy War #2) by R.F. Kuang

            Here are some of the MANY books I hope to read by the end of 2019 (many of these I received at Book Expo 2019!):  

            Those of my picks for the Best Speculative Fiction Books of 2019. I’m still aiming to read at least 100 books by the end of this year; and, I want to write as many reviews here, on Goodreads, on NetGalley and Edelweiss, and on Amazon and Barnes & Noble. If you have any suggestions on what I should read, then please mention them in the Comments Section below. Please keep in mind that I might not be able to get access to certain books for various reasons (i.e. no $$$, waitlist at the library, etc.). Yet, I want to read as much as I can before 2019 ends (it’ll make my Award Reading Challenge 2020 much easier). 

            Which speculative fiction books released in 2019 have been your favorite so far?