Why You Need to Read…My Selections for Best Speculative Fiction Books of 2019…So Far

We are halfway through 2019 and this year’s speculative fiction books have been both enjoyable and bountiful. Most of the books I’ve read so far this year have been amazing, and I still have A LOT of books in my TBR pile to go through. Like you, I’m an ardent reader and I’ll read just about anything I can get my hands on and has an interesting story. I’ve enjoyed novels, novellas, short stories across various genres of literature. If you’re interested in knowing some of the 51 books I’ve read between January 1stand June 30th2019, then please check out my Goodreads page here: https://www.goodreads.com/Misty306

            I’ve been trying to keep up with both ARCs, and the long list of nominations for this year’s Literary Awards as part of my Reading Award Challenge 2019. I knew it would be harder than it sounded, but I’ve read (and still reading) a lot of amazing books that I wouldn’t have done so otherwise. I suggest that you read a few of the numerous nominations for any of the 2019 SFF Awards. 

That being said, I wanted to point out some of speculative fiction books that were released in 2019 that I’ve enjoyed the most, so far. These are books I recommend you read, especially if you’re a fan of this genre of literature like I am. And, just so you know, these are books that I’ve read and finished between the 1sthalf of 2019. 

These are my Top Ten Picks in no particular order:

The Winter of the Witch (Winternight Trilogy #3) by Katherine Arden

The Wolf in the Whale by Jordanna Max Brodsky

In An Absent Dream (Wayward Children #4) by Seanan McGuire

Uncanny Collateral (Valkyrie Collections #1) by Brian McClellan

Seven Blades in Black (The Grave of Empires #1) by Sam Sykes

A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World by C.A. Fletcher

Aurora Rising (The Aurora Cycle #1) by Amie Kaufman & Jay Kristoff

An Illusion of Thieves (Chimera #1) by Cate Glass

Her Silhouette, Drawn in Water by Vylar Kaftan

Sisters of the Fire (Blood and Gold #2) by Kim Wilkins

Right now, I’m currently reading (released in 2019):

Broken Veil (Harbinger #5) by Jeff Wheeler

Velocity Weapon (The Protectorate #1) by Megan E. O’Keefe

One Word Kill (Impossible Times #1) by Mark Lawrence

Holy Sister (Book of the Ancestor #3) by Mark Lawrence

The Dragon Republic (The Poppy War #2) by R.F. Kuang

            Here are some of the MANY books I hope to read by the end of 2019 (many of these I received at Book Expo 2019!):  

            Those of my picks for the Best Speculative Fiction Books of 2019. I’m still aiming to read at least 100 books by the end of this year; and, I want to write as many reviews here, on Goodreads, on NetGalley and Edelweiss, and on Amazon and Barnes & Noble. If you have any suggestions on what I should read, then please mention them in the Comments Section below. Please keep in mind that I might not be able to get access to certain books for various reasons (i.e. no $$$, waitlist at the library, etc.). Yet, I want to read as much as I can before 2019 ends (it’ll make my Award Reading Challenge 2020 much easier). 

            Which speculative fiction books released in 2019 have been your favorite so far?

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Why You Need to Read: “Nevernight”

The Nevernight Chronicle: Book One: Nevernight

By: Jay Kristoff

Published: August 9, 2016

Genre: Fantasy, Grimdark

            “A girl some called. Pale Daughter. Or Kingmaker. Or Crow. But most often, nothing at all. A killer of killers, whose tally of endings only the goddess and I truly know. And was she famous or infamous for it at the end? All this death? I confess I could never see the difference. But then, I’ve never seen things the way you have.” (Caveat Emptor).

            This novel, and trilogy, begins with the end and its aftermath: an empire is in ruins and its society has been left in shambles by a teenaged assassin, who killed more people than can be recorded. We are told this by the narrator who decides to record her story about her early life, the path that led her to becoming an assassin, and her death. Jay Kristoff introduces his readers to Mia Corvere, “a killer of killers.”

            Mia Corvere is the protagonist and readers are introduced to her as she is killing a man. We learn two things about her immediately after. One, the murder is part of her initiation into the Red Church—a league of lethal assassins—and the institution that trains them. Two, Mia is the daughter of Justicus Darius Corvere—one of the four leaders who led a failed rebellion against The Republic of Itreya—who was publicly executed when she was 10 years-old. The aftermath led to her mother—Dona Corvere, Alinne—and her infant brother—Jonnen—being arrested and imprisoned, too. Mia is taken away to be drowned in the river; obviously, she escapes and is raised by Mercurio, a retired assassin, who trains Mis in the basics of killing so that she can avenge her family. She is about 16 years-old when she travels to the Red Church for training. Accompanying Mia is her shadow daemon—in the shape of a cat—Mister Kindly. Once at the Red Church, Mia meets her classmates: Tric, Ashlinn and Osrik Järnheim, Hush, Jessamine Gratianus and Diamo. All of them are also rivals for one of the four spots for the title, “Blade,” an assassin for the Red Church. This is done by impressing one of the Shahiids—Solis, Spiderkiller, Mouser and Aalea—as well as Drusilla, the Revered Mother, and Cassius, the Lord of Blades (and a Darkin—one who controls the darkness with their shadow daemon—like Mia). Throughout her training, Mia never forgets her goal—avenging her family—but, Mia begins to question the nature of an assassin all while learning about her abilities as a Darkin and solving the mystery of who is killing the residents of the Red Church. 

            The plot of Nevernight is about Mia’s training to become an assassin and what she endures to make it through the initiation. At the same time, we learn about Mia’s past, which led her to both Mercurio and the Red Church. Both plots are crucial because we learn about Mia through this plot and character development. Readers learn that Mia doesn’t miss the life of being a nobleman’s daughter, she misses her parents and her brother. The subplot is the killer who is attacking the apprentices within the Red Church. While it is not surprising for a league of assassins to have enemies, it is surprising that the perpetrator(s) is attacking the initiates inside the Red Church, and not even those in charge can the perpetrator’s identity. This subplot is essential because it presents Mia with a realistic view of what being a member of the Red Church entails. 

            The narrative in Nevernight is one of the most creative ones I’ve come across in a while. The chronicles are written in the past tense because Mia is dead; however, this recording switches between the “present”—as we’re reading it—and, Mia’s “past”—everything that occurred before Mia arrived at the Red Church. This 3rd limited point-of-view lets readers know how Mia, and those closest to her, are feeling and thinking in the story. In addition, much of the world-building is mentioned in the footnotes, which is both informative and hilarious, so that readers have a better understanding of the world the author is creating. And yes, it’s based on Ancient Rome. While it becomes obvious in the beginning chapters as to who is writing Mia’s story, it is unclear how the Chronicler is able to recall all of these moments of Mia’s life. That being said, we are left to believe that this narrator is a reliable one. 

            Jay Kristoff’s style is as creative as his choice of narration. Mia’s past experiences are written in italics, which makes it easy for readers to distinguish between Mia’s “past” and “present.” Mia’s daemon, Mister Kindly’s—who talks to her and to the other characters (when he chooses to)—dialogue is written in lowercase italics. This is brilliant because the author found a creative way to distinguish the dialogue between two species (?). The information provided within the “footnotes” present the truth surrounding society, especially the culture and the history—both brutal and carnal. The “footnotes” provide satire of the society. Both the mood and the tone are relatable and juxtapose to each other. The mood tells readers of the realities within this fictional story—cruel, harsh and unforgiving. Mia’s father is executed publicly for organizing a failed rebellion, her mother and her brother are imprisoned, and she escaped her execution and was raised by a former assassin who trains her as his apprentice. The tone tells us that one’s path towards revenge usually leaves that individual (and many others) dead. 

            I would describe the appeal surrounding Nevernight as a hidden jewel. It is popular in the grimdark subgenre, and it’s gaining more recognition within the rest of the speculative fiction community. In other words, more and more people are reading this novel. Historical fiction readers will appreciate Kristoff’s society which is based on historical and cultural research. Godsgrave—the 2nd book in The Nevernight Chronicle—was released in 2017 and is an amazing follow-up to Nevernight (review coming soon). And, Darkdawn, the 3rdand final book in the trilogy, will be released in September 2019. 

            Nevernight is a great novel for those who are curious about the grimdark subgenre. Besides that the characters, the plot, the subplots and the style will keep readers interested from the Caveat Emptor (opening chapter). The harsh reality told within the pages reminds us that good and bad are NOT concepts, but manifestations within each individual; everyone is capable of both, but what drives them to perform acts of one or both? This is the question readers are forced to ask themselves more than once. Nevernight is both an enjoyable and a psychological read that I’ll re-read over and over again!

My rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!

Why You Need to Read: “Aurora Rising”

The Aurora Cycle: #1: Aurora Rising

By: Amie Kaufman & Jay Kristoff

Published: May 7, 2019

Genre: Young Adult, Science Fiction

            “Scarlett Jones (diplomat) introduces the other members of our squad. ‘Tyler Jones, our commander. Zila Madran, science officer. Finian de Seel. Engineer. Catherine Brannock, pilot. And finally, Kaliis Idraban Gilwraeth, combat specialist’.” (Chapter 7, Kal).

            I’ve always been curious to read stories by authors who write multiple genres of literature. Jay Kristoff has written several amazing stories within the sub-genres in both the fantasy and the science fiction genres. Now, he’s back with a new series with Amie Kaufman—who co-wrote The Illuminae Files with Kristoff—to present us with Aurora Rising, the first book in The Aurora Cycle. Jay Kristoff has described the series as a cross between The Breakfast Club and The Guardians of the Galaxy, which piques a reader’s curiosity. 

            This series is different from many other ones in that the story occurs after the characters graduate from school. Aurora Academy is a military school for future space cadets; and, after they graduate, there is a draft in which the top commanders get to pick their crew members for their first set of missions. Tyler Jones, who is The Top of his Class, missed the draft because he decided to explore a restricted section of a dimension—The Fold—used for space travel, stumbled upon a ship that was lost over 200 years ago, and rescued its only survivor—a girl who is the same age as him, technically. The good news is that his twin sister, Scarlett—who is a trained diplomat—and their best friend, Cat Brannock—a pilot nicknamed “Zero”—bail on the draft in order to join his crew. Unfortunately, those who make up the rest of Tyler’s crew—the science officer, the engineer, and the combat specialist—are the ones no one else wanted in their crew: an aloof girl with a trigger finger, a handicapped boy with a motormouth, and an ostracized male whose species is in the midst of a civil war and he’s not fighting in it. Then, there’s Aurora Jie-Lin O’Malley—or Auri—the girl who slept in cyro for over 200 years, who awakens with mystical powers and with the top intergalactic police forces deeming her a criminal and are attempting to arrest her. Meet Squad 312! All of these characters have flaws and with them being 17 years-old, they don’t know how to deal with their insecurities, which make all of these characters more relatable and more believable. 

            Both the plot and the narrative are told in the point-of-views of all 7 characters! Multiple P.O.V.s are NOT new for YA books, for it allows for both character development and plot development. For example, Tyler is a leader, who jumps to conclusions surrounding his crew members—with the exception of his sister—and he would rather follow orders than question them. Kal’s species is in the middle of a civil war and he must choose between serving his tenure with Squad 312 or leaving to participate in the war. Then, there’s Auri, who is dealing with being out-of-time and understanding what is happening to her. 

            The author’s style reminds readers of the reality of space travel. While it’s exciting, it’s dangerous and requires training and knowledge in order to endure it. Auri almost dies after spending over 200 years in cryostasis; Kal’s people are decimating each other in a civil war, which broke a treaty, which had dire consequences; and, an intergalactic coverup is the real threat to the universe. Both the mood and the tone match what Kaufman and Kristoff are exploring in this series: space is vast, mysterious, and archaic. Add an element of danger that is as realistic as space travel and you have a story told by these authors. Both authors do an excellent job illustrating the differences between the star students and the outcasts. However, school is out, and so are the treatments they were all used to receiving. Both the mood and the tone display the need for these characters to become the adults they need to be!

            The appeal surrounding Aurora Rising will be a positive one, and I say this because there are adolescent readers who are sci-fi fans, who have been craving for a new book series about space explorers who are kids like themselves! In response, Kaufman and Kristoff have come up with a trilogy that reflects the Star Trek series. Young readers will enjoy this novel because the characters are kids who just graduated from school and have to deal with the reality of the “real” world/universe. Adult readers will enjoy this book because it will remind them of how they were like after completing school and continuing on with life. The truth within the fiction is what will appeal to readers the most. And yes, I’m already looking forward to the second book in this series!

            Aurora Rising is a fun sci-fi book that presents the collaboration of two authors to readers who are both familiar and unfamiliar with them. While both the character development and the world-building are well done, the plot leaves more questions than answers, which means there will be a follow up to this book, obviously. Yet, the story is entertaining enough for readers to want more from this trilogy. 

My rating: Enjoy it (4 out of 5).