Why You Need to Read: “Velocity Weapon”

The Protectorate: Book 1: Velocity Weapon                          

By: Megan E. O’Keefe                                        Audiobook: 18 hours 22 minutes

Published: June 11, 2019                                  Narrated by: Joe Jameson

Genre: Science Fiction/Space Opera

I am called “The Light of Berossus,” the voice said, (Chapter 1, The Aftermath of the Battle of Dralee). 

For every individual in a fandom, there is the moment, in which they were hooked, thus beginning their membership. For me and science fiction, it was my parents’ love for the two Star Trek shows which aired during the 1990s: The Next Generation and Deep Space Nine—yes, Star Wars was part of my introduction to the genre, too. From there, I started reading science fiction novels, until I stopped. Don’t get me wrong, I was still a fan of the genre, but I didn’t read as many books as I wanted to (there were plenty of movies, TV shows and video games, but that’s for another time). Sometime later I got back into the science fiction by reading the recent releases by different authors which had my exploring the genre again. Yet, it was Velocity Weapon by Megan E. O’Keefe which kept my interest to the point where I bought the audiobook so that I could know what happened after my “stop point” in reading the print book. This space opera reintroduced me to the science fiction genre and reminded me why I fell in love with it in the first place!

There are 3 protagonists in this novel, who narrate the events over the course of several years from 3 different settings. First, there is Sanda Greeve. She is a sergeant for the Ada Prime System, and the last thing she remembers is being shot by the Icarions before her evac pod allowed her to escape, onto an enemy ship—an A.I. Smartship. When she wakes up she learns is the only living being on the ship—The Light of Berossus, or Bero—and, when she asks how and why this is possible, she learns that it’s been 230 years since her ship was shot down. Sanda processes this shocking bit of news as she figures out a way to survive in space with a smartship for company. Next, there is Biran Greeve, Sanda’s younger brother, who has just graduated from the academy at the top of his class. This means that Biran will become a Keeper—a member of the Protectorate who leads Ada Prime and is one of the “keepers” of secrets and knowledge of the Star Systems, which are embedded in a chip that gets implanted inside their skull. However, as Biran is giving his speech, the Battle of Dralee—the same battle his older sister ends up fighting in—breaks out. Biran must behave as a Keeper before his indoctrination and before he can wonder whether or not his sister survived the battle. Last, there is Jules, a thief. During the latest heist with her crew, Jules and the others stumble upon two things: a dead body and a room filled with test tubes. There are other characters who interact with these protagonists throughout the story: Lolla and Harlan, Tomas Cepko, Anaia, and Callie Mera; and, they all help the protagonists develop into the people they need to be given their circumstances. Then, there is Bero, who is more than a smartship. It is aware of what’s going on more than its letting on to everyone else. 

The plot of this novel is an interesting one. The Battle of Dralee in the Prime Standard Year 3541 starts the story and the plot emerges from there, from the Greeve siblings. Biran must step up into his role as Keeper, while he breaks protocol in order to search for his missing sister. Sanda is drifting towards another Star System injured and alone on a damaged smartship. She must rely on her training and instincts, and on Bero to survive her situation. There are two subplots, which are related to the plot. The first one is the secret, in which Jules and her crew stumble across and what it could mean for them, for Icarion and for Ada Prime. The second one focuses on Bero and his motivations. Why is an enemy smartship drifting in the middle of Space? And, why did he rescue Sergeant Sanda Greeve? The plot and the subplots develop alongside the characters and the world-building at an appropriate rate, which make it impossible for the readers to lose track of everything that is going on in the story. 

The narrative jumps across 3 different years from 3 different locations from the points-of-view of several characters. All of the narratives are told in first person from the protagonists and the other characters perspectives. Readers must pay attention to the sequence of the narrative because while the narrative is the present for one character, it may be occurring in the past or the future for another character. The sequence of the narrative starts off with puzzlement for both the readers and the characters, but the events within the sequence keep the narrative in one constant motion where it can be followed by the readers and the audience. The characters’ streams-of-consciousness allow readers to know the thoughts of the characters and the reasons they make the decisions and perform the actions they do. There are moments of flashbacks within the narrative, and they provide clues of the bigger story that is being told. 

The style Megan E. O’Keefe uses in Velocity Weapon consists of the jargon of science fiction, the colloquialism of the armed forces, and the terminology for the world of space she cultivated for this series. The idea that two-star systems have been at war with each other for hundreds, or thousands, of years, with Earth as the potential beacon for the establishments for these star systems is an interesting factor to consider for the sort of story the author is presenting to her readers. The author is not presenting a science fiction story about two warring nations, she is writing a space opera—”a space story involving conflict between opponents possessing powerful technologies and abilities on a very large scale”—and about the consequences of hidden technology, which is the tone of this novel. The mood is hostility, including what it entails and how it is dealt with. While it is not that different from other space operas, it’s the way the author writes it that makes it very engaging.

The appeal for Velocity Weapon has been positive for sci-fi fans—which is good—but, minimal for the rest of the speculative fiction community. And, what I mean by that is that it is a great story that seems to be limited to one part of the literary fandom. There is enough of the same themes and ideas found in other works of science fiction and in fantasy fiction, yet it seems that more people would read this book and others like it if given the chance to learn about this story. There is a reason why this book was one of My Selections for Best Speculative Fiction Books of 2019. When I wasn’t able to continue reading this story, I finished it by listening to the audiobook. Joe Jameson’s performance of the characters make them easy for listeners to make out which character is speaking and narrating the story; and, his narration and voice is appropriate for the story that is being read by the listeners. The next book in The Protectorate series, Chaos Vector, will be released in July 2020. Fans of the first book are waiting eagerly to learn what happens next.

Velocity Weapon is an entertaining space opera about family, government conspiracies, A.I. ships, and an ongoing military campaign between nations that will keep readers’ interests from beginning to end. Megan E. O’Keefe demonstrates her abilities for writing engaging stories across the spectrum of speculative fiction. Sci-fi fans should consider adding it to theirs. This book is a reminder that space is a fascinating frontier!

My Rating: Enjoy It (4.5 out of 5). 

Why You Need to Read: “The Murders of Molly Southbourne”

Molly Southbourne #1: The Murders of Molly Southbourne

By: Tade Thompson

Published: October 3, 2017

Genre: Horror, Science Fiction

Winner of the Nommo Award for Best Novella 2018

            The rules are simple.

            “If you see a girl who looks like you, run and fight.

            Don’t bleed.

            If you bleed, blot, burn, and bleach.

            If you find a hole, find your parents.”

            Molly recites the lines to herself many times. She finds herself many times. She finds herself repeating them without intending to when she is bored, (Two).

            The Murders of Molloy Southbourne is an homage to classic horror and science fiction stories such as Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Frankenstein. To say that Molly Southbourne makes the best of her situation through survival is a HUGE understatement. If Tade Thompson’s Rosewater didn’t capture your attention, then his novella will!

            Our first introduction to Molly Southbourne is from the perspective of the person she has shackled in her basement. After a few interesting interactions, Molly Southbourne tells the person her life story. From there, the person—and the reader—learns about the unusual upbringing and life of this tragic individual. Molly Southbourne grew up on a farm with her parents. And, due to an unusual condition, she is home-schooled. In between learning about literature, languages, and mathematics, Molly learns hand-to-hand combat, different types of bleach, and pyromantics. These lessons are essential because whenever Molly bleeds, a clone of her appears; and, whenever a “molly” appears, that “molly” attacks Molly. In order to keep Molly’s condition a secret, Molly is taught how to fight, to kill, to butcher, and to dispose “herself.” As eerie as it sounds, Molly proves to be an intelligent and a resilient individual. Unfortunately, life gets more complicated as she grows into adulthood and attempts to live a “normal” life. Molly continues to grow as a person, but she can neither keep her condition a secret, nor cope with what her condition could lead to. As much as Molly wants to be “normal,” she cannot.

            The plot of the story is Molly Southbourne’s life right up to the prisoner in her basement, and it follows a traditional sci-fi/horror storyline. Molly’s entire life has been stringent due to her “condition,” and as the plot develops, so does Molly, and we all realize Molly can only endure her situation for so long. At the same time, the subplots—Molly’s prisoner, and the root of Molly’s “condition”—are developing. To say both subplots will remind you of a spy thriller would be an understatement. By the time Molly discovers the “truth” of her existence, both the plot and, the subplots converge, and Molly’s character development reaches its end. 

            The narrative starts off in the first-person of Molly Southbourne’s prisoner. The prisoner is disoriented and has no memory of how and why Molly is doing what she is doing. Chapters 2 and 3 are told in flashback by Molly Southbourne and she refers to herself in the third-person. In the last chapter, the narrative switches back to the prisoner’s point-of-view, which is in the present. While it is easy for readers to view the prisoner as a reliable narrator, it is difficult to perceive Molly Southbourne as one. Yes, the narrative is vital to both the plot development and the character development, and it can be followed, but—by the end—both the prisoner and the readers are left with more questions than answers. It is safe to say that Molly Southbourne feels the same way, but she doesn’t know what else to do. 

            The style Tade Thompson presents in this novella is a throwback to the earliest horror stories we now view as classics. The word choice and the sentence structure alerts readers that the author wants your attention. Both the mood—bizarre—and, the tone—apathetic—are obvious as soon as you begin reading the story. The author makes sure that the actions and the skills of his protagonist come across as “normal” and that the condition of Molly Southbourne is “unusual.” Tade Thompson allows readers to determine whether or not Molly’s story is believable. At the same time, the author uses pivotal moments of Molly Southbourne’s life—her first menstrual period, her first boyfriend, etc.—to remind his audience over and over that Molly Southbourne is unique and lethal in her own right. Tade Thompson’s style of writing leaves the story with an open ending; just like the classic horror stories.

            The appeal surrounding The Murders of Molly Southbourne have been positive. The book won the “Nommo Award for Best Novella” in 2018; and, was nominated for the British Science Fiction Association Award, the Shirley Jackson Award, and the British Fantasy Award. The Tor.com eBook Club selected this novella as its June 2019 selection (free ebook!). Readers and critics enjoyed it enough that its sequel, The Survival of Molly Southbourne, is an anticipated follow-up (published July 9, 2019)! The Murders of Molly Southbourne is an amazing addition to the horror (and science fiction) genre and demonstrates Tade Thompson’s talent as a storyteller. This novella is enjoyable to the point where it can be read over and over again; and, readers might find an additional clue surrounding Molly Southbourne’s life during one of their many re-reads (I did!). I’m looking forward to reading the next book in the series. 

            The Murders of Molly Southbourne is the perfect story for readers who enjoy horror stories. All of the events that lead to the actions performed by Molly Southbourne and those she loves reminds readers that living with any condition is bearable as long as that individual is willing to bear it. Tade Thompson knows how to present a realistic horror story.

My rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!!!

Why You Need to Read: “Rosewater”

The Wormwood Trilogy: Book 1: Rosewater

By: Tade Thompson

Published: first published November 15, 2016; reprinted September 18, 2018

Genre: Science Fiction/Afrofuturism 

Winner of the Nommo Award for Best Novel 2017

Apart from the classified stuff about sensitives and the xenosphere, most information about the dome is in the public domain, but it is amazing that the fringe press and conspiracy theorists have different ideas…There are those who believe the dome is a magical phenomenon. I won’t get started on the quasi-religious set,” (Chapter One).

A friend of mine gave me an ARC of this book from one of the many book expos she attends every year. Instantly, I was captivated by the information found on the back of the book. An alien biodome with “healing powers” appears in Nigeria; people with abilities are either forced into hiding, or forced to work for the government; and, the rest of the world—such as the U.S.A.—have found a way to isolate themselves from the aliens and each other. Tade Thompson’s debut novel is a great combination of sci-fi tropes, human behavior, and originality. 

The characters in this novel are not trying to save the world, or travel into space. These characters are surviving within their communities due to secrets and abilities that others would die to know about. Kaaro is the protagonist of the story and we learn about him very quickly; he uses his abilities for the two jobs he has: as a security “monitor” at a bank and as an “informant” for the government. Kaaro is a “sensitive” who can “find things,” and before he worked at the bank and for the government, he was a criminal whose actions caught up with him. Readers learn about Kaaro through his interactions with Femi Alaagomeji, his boss; Aminat, his lover, who has secrets of her own; Molara, a strange being that resides within the xenosphere; and, the mysterious “Bicycle Girl” who may or may not have some knowledge about Rosewater, the biodome and its purpose. This is how readers learn of Kaaro’s character. Kaaro degrades himself, constantly, due to his low self-esteem and his guilt about his past. 

The plot for Rosewateris learning the how and the why the alien biodome appeared on Earth, and why it offers “healing” to humans. The plot unravels as the story moves along with readers asking questions about the biodome, the aliens, and the rest of the world. The multiple subplots: Kaaro’s abilities as a sensitive is being exploited by his employers, Kaaro’s budding relationship with Aminat and the secrets they decide to reveal to each other as they spend more time together, and Kaaro’s past actions and how they connect to the biodome. All of the subplots are connected to the plot of the story, and it’s not what you expect it to be.

The narrative within Rosewateris told from Kaaro’s point-of-view and is told in real-time with the chapters jumping back-and-forth across a time span of 30 years in various, and actual, locations—an achronological plot. With the exception of the chapters labeled “Now,” the narrative focuses on events that provide answers to the readers’ questions about the characters and the setting. Tade Thompson’s narrative—which is similar to the flashback narrative in the TV show, Lost—focuses on parts from Kaaro’s past instead of all of it. This way, readers obtain what is relevant to the story thus keeping it on track.

The style provided by Tade Thompson in the novel uses a reliable narrator. Usually, authors do not reveal whether or not their narrators are reliable, especially in first person narratives. However, with Kaaro readers know he is reliable due to his outlook of his life due to the choices he’s made as well as admitting how and why Kaaro became a criminal and everything else that happens afterwards. At the same time, we learn of Kaaro’s feelings about the biodome through the author’s tone (his attitude) and his mood (how the readers should feel) about the biodome, which is suspicion. The style within Rosewaterprovides several mysteries within this science fiction story.

The appeal surrounding Rosewaterspeaks for itself. The novel was so popular and so immersive that it won the Nommo Award for Best Novel in 2017, and was reprinted by Orbit in 2018. In addition, Tade Thompson’s book was nominated for the John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Novel in 2017. The Rosewater Insurrectionis the sequel to Rosewater, and it is one of the most anticipated speculative fiction books of 2019, which picks up where the first novel left off. Personally, Rosewatermade My Selections for Best Speculative Fiction Books of 2018 for similar reasons.

Overall, Rosewateris a brilliant debut novel that fans of speculative fiction will enjoy. Both the setting and the mention of science and religion provide a sense of realism to the story. My only issue with Rosewaterwas that the plot development and the character development took longer than other recent science fiction stories I’ve read. Yet, the buildup to the reveal(s) by the novel’s end will stimulate readers into reading The Rosewater Insurrectionand other stories by the author. Tade Thompson’s method of telling believable science fiction stories will leave readers entertained and vigilant. 

My rating: Enjoy It (4 out of 5)!