Why You Need to Read: “Black Sun”

Between Earth and Sky, #1: Black Sun

By: Rebecca Roanhorse

Published: October 13, 2020

Genre: Fantasy/Folklore/Historical Fantasy

            This year, the solstice will be marked by the rarest of celestial occurrences. As the year divides into old and new, so also will the earth, sun, and moon align in the Convergence. Over our very heads, we will witness order move to chaos and back to order again. So it is with the heavens, so it will be with Tova. We will bear witness to the cycle of evil rising in darkness to be battled back by goodness and light when the sun prevails, (Chapter 9). 

            Remember when I said that I read Trail of Lightning, the first book in The Sixth World series, because I wanted to determine for myself whether or not the author was as big of a deal as the speculative fiction genre community made her out to be? And, that the author’s book was worth reading? Well, if Trail of Lightning was part of Rebecca Roanhorse’s debut—the other being her award-winning short story, “Welcome to Your Authentic Indian Experience”—then, Black Sun, the first book in the Between Earth and Sky series, cements her status as one of the must-read authors within the genre. 

            There are four protagonists in this novel. First, is Serapio, the son of an Obregi Lord and a foreigner. The foreigner is his mother, Saaya, who along with three others, prepare Serapio towards his destiny of his transcendence to godhood. Second, is Xiala, a female sea captain and an exile from the Teek tribe. She is hired to bring cargo to Tova, one of whom is Serapio. The two exiles form a friendship during their journey to Tova. Along the way, Xiala learns about Serapio and realizes that his magic is just as powerful and as lethal as hers. Third, is Naranpa, one of the four priests in Tova—and, the head of the oracle society. On top of all of her responsibilities, she must deal with several political conspiracies all at once, including: several assassination attempts on her life, rumors surrounding the death of one of the matrons to one of the four tribes, prophecies surrounding the return of the crow god, rumors of what is to come on the winter solstice, talks of revenge for an event of the past, and the plot to have her removed from her seat of power. With all of these political conspiracies surrounding her, Naranpa doesn’t know who to trust. This includes Iktan—head of the knife society—one of the other four priests and Naranpa’s friend. The fourth and final protagonist is Okoa, the son of the Carrion Crow matron and future leader of the Shield, a military troop who serve as the matron’s bodyguards. After his mother’s death, Okoa rises to his role. During the transition, he uncovers two conspiracies. One is about his mother’s death, and the other is about the cultists from his tribe who believe their god can be raised and returned to them so that past wrongs can be paid back through divine retribution. All of these protagonists are complex people who find themselves being responsible for a group of people, and their choices affect those around them and everything they care about. As “The Day of Convergence” approaches, each of the protagonists develop into the individuals their roles demand of them to the point where not even the secondary characters can divert them from their path. 

            The plot of this novel involves the events that lead up to “The Day of Convergence,” which falls on the winter solstice. The plot develops through each of the protagonists as they uncover the mystery of what is to occur on that day, and whether or not it can be prevented. Serapio travels to Tova in order to fulfill his destiny of becoming a god, as per his mother’s actions. Naranpa is doing everything she can to remain the Sun Priest of the Celestial Tower while uncovering a plot of revenge against the Faith for a treacherous transgression from the past which left hundreds dead. Okoa is trying to unravel the events that led up to his mother’s death while trying to shake off the unwanted attention of his tribe’s cultist group. And, Xiala is trying to keep her powers in check while deciding whether or not to bring the apocalypse into Tova. While these appear to be four separate plots, they converge into one unforgettable moment when all of the protagonists must decide on acting on their destiny, or doing the right thing. There are two subplots within this novel which not only explains the plots, but also the motivations for the actions that take place at the novel’s end. The first one is vengeance. Vengeance, while mentioned from time-to-time, plays a large role in the story. Usually, the reason for an act of revenge depends on those who want it; but, in this case, everyone is expecting it. It all depends on who is involved and when the act will be carried out. The second subplot involves religion and magic. Similar to our world and other fantasy worlds, there are a few religions, each with its own rituals and practices. Some of this involves magic and how those in the out-group view that magic as opposed to their magic. Some of it is accepted, some are based in superstition, and a lot of it is forbidden; yet, it is all real and powerful, especially when done correctly. These subplots play a huge role in the plot development and must not be overlooked by the reader(s).

            The narratives are told from the points-of-view of the four protagonists. And, they are in third-person limited, which means readers know only what each protagonist is thinking and is experiencing at one time. Even when two characters are together, we are limited only to one character’s P.O.V. The sequence of the narration jumps back-and-forth from the start of Serapio’s transcendence to “The Day of Convergence” to the aftermath. While the sequence might come off as confusing, it is not because readers learn of all of the essential events leading up to the winter solstice from multiple P.O.V.s. So, while the narration moves from past to present, it follows a stream-of-consciousness of each protagonist so that we gain a better understanding of them, their culture, and their motivation of their actions. This presents the readers with a reliable narration (from each protagonist) that can be followed easily.

            The style Rebecca Roanhorse uses for her new series is amazing and informative. Once again, she draws on inspiration from her Native American heritage; but this time, the author draws on inspiration from Yucatec Mayan, Tewa, Polynesian and pre-Columbian cultures of the Americas, many of which continues to be glossed over in school curriculums worldwide. Some of what I recall of ancient pre-Columbian societies (i.e. Mayan, Aztec, Inca, etc.) involve rituals and ceremonies to the gods, and their calendar, which was accurate. History and folklore aside, the use of foreshadowing and of characterization enhances the story to the point where readers known what is going to happen and why, and that there was no way to prevent the events from happening. By the time everything is revealed, the protagonists have made their decisions, and what is going to happen, happens. This leaves the reader(s) stunned, yet anticipating what will happen next during the aftermath of those events. It’s a shocking and an impressive move by the author. The mood in this novel is preparation. Everything that happens in this novel revolves on the winter solstice. To many, the day marks a celebration. To the protagonists and the other characters involved, it’s a day of dread, retribution, and change. The tone of the novel is fate. Without getting into too many spoilers, two of the protagonists were predestined to be part of “The Day of Convergence,” but an argument can be made that they could have chosen to resist that fate at any given time before that day. In fact, the choices of the other two protagonists should be noted as well because they all have no choice but to live with the decisions they make leading up to the winter solstice. I read an eARC of this book, and it did NOT come with any maps of the setting. Luckily, Rebecca Roanhorse provided some of the maps through Tor.com, which made picturing the mentioned towns and the distance between the cities easier.

            The appeal for Black Sun is already positive. So far, literary critics and other authors have praised Rebecca Roanhorse for the story she has written. Fans of the author’s urban fantasy series will be impressed with how the author can fuse her heritage into one story of the past and another story of the future. Not to mention that this book is an amazing addition to the fantasy canon, and will leave readers anticipating the second book in this series. Fans of historical and/or mythological fantasy—Tasha Suri, S.A. Chakraborty, Evan Winter and Silvia Moreno-Garcia—should read this book as soon as they are able to, they will enjoy it a lot.

            Black Sun is proof that Rebecca Roanhorse can weave her talent and her heritage into powerful stories over and over again. If you need a reason to read one of her books, or if you want to read a fantasy series that will take your expectations to another level, then you really should read this book. It has everything from magic and prophecies to political power struggle based on a moment in human history, in which it all could have happened, but its setting is a fantasy world. I don’t know about you, but while I’m waiting for Book 2 of this series, I’ll be reading Storm of Locusts, Book 2 in the author’s other series. Enjoy!      

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!!!

Why You Need to Read: “Uprooted”

Uprooted

By: Naomi Novik

Published: May 19, 2015

Genre: Fantasy/Fractured Fairy Tale or Fairy Tale Retelling/Coming-of-Age Story

            The Dragon didn’t always take the prettiest girl, but he always took the most special one, somehow: if there was one girl who was far and away the prettiest, or the most bright, or the best dancer, or especially kind, somehow he always picked her out, even though he scarcely exchanged a word with the girls before he made his choice, (Chapter 1).

            I remember what led me to read this book. The ebook was on sale and I saw the promotion for its upcoming companion novel, Spinning Silver. Then, I attended BookCon in 2018. I had read an excerpt of the author’s upcoming novel, Spinning Silver, and I wanted to meet her and have her sign copies of her books. Yes, books, because in addition to Spinning Silver, I picked up Naomi Novik’s other books, His Majesty’s Dragon, Temeraire Book 1—which, I still haven’t read, yet—and Uprooted, which I had already read. I reviewed Spinning Silver first. Both books are similar in themes and tropes, but they stand out well as individual standalone novels. 

            Agnieszka is 17-years-old and lives with her parents in the village, Dvernik, near the corrupted Wood’s border. A wizard, known only as “the Dragon” to the villagers, protects the village from the Wood, which is his task set to him from the royal court. As part of the Dragon’s tribute, he takes one girl from the village for 10 years of service. No one knows what the service entails except the girls return as women, but “changed,” and leave the village for city life shortly after. Agnieszka is tall, clumsy and awkward, and she’s one of the girls who is of the age for the Dragon to choose from for his next tribute. However, Agnieszka knows she won’t be chosen, but her friend, Kasia, will be the one chosen. Kasia is beautiful and talented in almost everything she does, and Agnieszka and the entire village knows the Dragon will choose her. Only, he doesn’t. To everyone’s shock, Agnieszka is selected to serve the Dragon. Now, Agnieszka has to learn what is expected of her for the next 10 years. And, this includes filling in for the Dragon when he cannot attend court. Agnieszka learns about the Dragon and his service, why she was chosen over the other girls, and how the Wood became so corrupted. Agnieszka develops as a character and as a person as she learns about the outside world, which she has been sheltered from her entire life, and about the dark forces that make the Wood so dangerous. Agnieszka is accompanied by the Dragon, but as she learns more about what is expected from her, she refuses to lose contact with her family and her friends. Agnieszka grows up in an unusual way under unusual circumstances, and she manages in her own way.

            The plot is divided into two parts. The first part regards Agnieszka’s “services” to the Dragon, which is easier said than done. While Agnieszka shows promise with the more “difficult” tasks, she is awkward when it comes to completing the “easier” ones, which makes for a very entertaining “education.” The second plot revolves around the Wood and how it continues to grow stronger and more aggressive. After the Dragon is injured during a confrontation with the Wood, Agnieszka must travel to the royal court in his place in order to request reinforcements. Once there, Agnieszka meets the royal family and other individuals like the Dragon. It is here when the subplot develops: the Dragon’s relationship with the court, and the court’s connection to the Wood. The subplot explains the two plots of the novel as they all go at an appropriate rate.

            The narrative is told from Agnieszka’s point-of-view in first-person in the protagonist’s stream-of-consciousness. Everything the readers learn, is from Agnieszka’s perspective. If she is not where the action is taking place, then she learns about it afterwards from someone else (and, so do the readers). The fact that Agnieszka can only account for her actions and her experiences make her a reliable narrator. All of these elements make the narrative easy to follow.

            The style Naomi Novik uses for Uprooted follows both a fairy tale retelling and a fractured fairy tale. A fairy tale retelling is when a known fairy tale is retold with components that alter either the setting or the characters. A fractured fairy tale is when a smaller, yet popular part of a fairy tale is kept while the rest of the story changes. In this case, elements of the story, “Beauty and the Beast” can be found throughout the narrative, but the author presents a new story from the few parts she fractured and used. The mood in this novel is anticipation. All of the characters in the story are anxious or excited about an upcoming event, or dreading a threat that cannot be stopped. The tone of the novel focuses on how all of the characters remain resilient during such difficult times and how they handle themselves. The last two literary elements of style will make you forget about the fractured fairy tale and focus on the fantasy story.

            The appeal for Uprooted have been noteworthy. Besides receiving critical and popular acclaim, this novel won the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 2016. However, it seems that since the release of Spinning Silver, Uprooted has fallen a bit behind on the popularity, but I can assure you, if you enjoyed the former, then you will enjoy the latter. Uprooted remains a great addition to the fantasy canon, and fans of Katherine Arden, S.A. Chakraborty, and Rena Rossner will enjoy this book the most. There hasn’t been any announcements on whether or not we should expect another novel similar to this one, but I am willing to wait for as long as it takes, especially since the rumor is that both books are set in the same universe. Uprooted can be reread; in fact, older adolescents can read and enjoy this book as well (regardless of some of the adult content). 

            Uprooted is an entertaining coming-of-age story about identity and magic of all sorts. All of the familiar fairy tale tropes are twisted from what you know of them, and that makes the story more enjoyable. If you read and loved Spinning Silver, and you haven’t read Uprooted yet, then don’t wait any longer. If you want to read a fantasy story that uproots the expectations of the readers, then this is the book for you.

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!!!

Why You Need to Read: “Gideon the Ninth”

The Locked Tomb #1: Gideon the Ninth

By: Tasmyn Muir                                                                   Audiobook: 16 hours 50 minutes

Published: September 10, 2019                                              Narrated by: Moira Quirk

Genre: Dark Fantasy/Gothic

            When as a young and disinclined member of the Locked Tomb Gideon had painted her face, she had gone for the bare minimum of death’s-head that the role demanded: dark around the eyes, a bit around the nose, a slack black slash across the lips. Now as Harrowhark gave her a little palm of cracked mirror, she saw that she was painted like the ancient, tottering necromancers of the House: those ghastly and unsettling sages who never seemed to die, just disappear into the long galleries of books and coffins beneath Drearburh. She’d been slapped up to look like a grim-toothed, black-socketed skull, with big black holes on each side of the mandible.

            Gideon said drearily, “I look like a douche,” (5). 

            Hype and marketing for a book is an interesting feat some people find themselves in. Publishers and bookstores—usually through marketers—are paid to advertise such books for sale. Librarians read these books in order to determine whether or not the book(s) are “appropriate for their library and/or community.” And, reviewers—including book critics and bookbloggers—read these books and give an opinion on why each book should or should not be read. There are moments when reviews are controversial because they don’t match with the public’s opinion or the hype surrounding the book. That’s not to say that the book is “bad” or written poorly, but it didn’t meet the expectations of the reader. For me, this is what I felt while reading/listening to Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir.

            The protagonist is eighteen-year-old Gideon Nav, an indentured servant of the Ninth House, who are the Keepers of the Locked Tomb. Gideon’s life at the Ninth House has been nothing but harsh, neglectful, and mysterious. Readers meet Gideon as she tries to leave the Ninth House for the 33rd time. Instead, Gideon is bribed by Harrowhark Nonagesimus—the daughter and heir to the House of the Ninth—to train to be her cavalier so that she can train to become a Lyctor, one of the Imperial Saints for the Emperor. Gideon is promised her freedom if she does this “for the Ninth,” so Gideon and Harrow travel to the House of the First to train and to serve. There Gideon meets and interacts with: Teacher—one of the Keepers of the First House and servant to the Necrolord Heights; Abigail Pent and her cavalier, Magnus Quinn, of the Fifth House; Coronabeth Tridentarius and her cavalier, Protesilaus Eldoma, of the Seventh House; and several other heirs and their cavaliers from the other Houses, and a lot of skeletons. Gideon—while reluctant to serve the Ninth House—does take advantage of being away from the only place she’s known, leaves the planet, and trains in swordsmanship. Gideon does have to follow Harrowhark’s orders—to an extent—but, through her interactions with the other Houses and the tasks she manages to complete with Harrow, Gideon grows into the person she wants to be without interference from the Ninth House: helpful, caring, and strong (in a fight). Meanwhile, the other Houses learn that there’s more to the Ninth House than its titular role. 

            The plot of the novel is straightforward: The Emperor (of the First House) has called for the heirs of the other eight Houses to train to be Lyctors in order to serve as replacements for the current Lyctors. So, each heir and their cavalier travel to the First House where they are trained and are tested to the best of their knowledge and their strength. The nominated Hands must figure out the “puzzle” of their House with their cavalier so that the Hand can become a Lyctor. All of this is easier said than done, but all of the Hands are willing to do it. There are a few subplots in this novel. The first surrounds what it takes and what it means to be a Lyctor. Harrow wants to become one, and she is an extremely talented necromancer, but the testing to become a Lyctor is a process that must be solved by the Hand and the cavalier working together. This is interesting because Gideon and Harrowhark do NOT get along. So, in order to get what they both want, they’ll have to put up with each other to accomplish the goal. The second subplot is the mystery of the Ninth House and its establishment, from the Locked Tomb to the childhoods of both Gideon and Harrow. The other Houses are more curious by this than Gideon is, but Gideon doesn’t know, and Harrow isn’t going to talk about it to anyone. Or, will she? The last subplot focuses on the strange occurrences that begin to happen to the Hands and their cavaliers. Everyone is interested in new recruits arriving at the First House, right? All of these subplots work alongside the plot of the novel in order to embellish the world, the characters and the current predicament within this novel. 

            The narrative in Gideon the Ninth follows a present sequence from Gideon’s point-of-view. Her stream-of-consciousness gives readers insight into her thoughts (cynical, yet curious) while learning about the other eight Houses, which is something that didn’t interest her until now. The world-building—which includes the history and the culture of each House—comes from Gideon’s learning of them. The fight sequences and the many revelations come from Gideon’s P.O.V. Some of what is presented to her is told as a recitation and not as a flashback. This means that Gideon’s reactions are genuine and relatable, which make her a reliable narrator. The narrative is intriguing and is easy to follow. 

            The style Tasmyn Muir uses in her debut novel follows Gothic romance. In short—and, according to A Glossary of Literary Terms—“The locale was often a gloomy castle furnished with dungeons, subterranean passages, and sliding panels; the typical story focused on the sufferings imposed on an innocent heroine by a cruel and lustful villain, and made bountiful use of ghosts, mysterious disappearances, and other sensational and supernatural occurrences,” (p. 151). Fans of Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, The Monk by Matthew Gregory Lewis, Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë, and Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë are familiar with this genre of literature. However, I’m saying that Gideon the Ninth has elements of a gothic novel, NOT that it is one! The “villain” isn’t lustful, the supernatural occurrences—necromancy—is part of the world, and while it does have dungeons and secret passages, the First House isn’t described as being gloomy (when compared to the Ninth House). These gothic elements enhance the story the author is telling, which she does very well. The mood in this novel is anticipation. The summons from the First House does not only contain orders to attend, but also a chance to serve the Emperor, which is something the heirs are taught to do from childhood; and, their cavaliers get to serve their Houses. The tone in this book is dread. In a world where necromancy is the magic used and the setting is gothic, readers should expect more than a few unpleasant things to occur throughout the narrative. 

            I listened to the audiobook, which was narrated by Moira Quirk. She does a great job with narrating the story, voicing the various characters, and with the pronunciation of the characters’ names. I would not have been able to pronounce ANY of those names on my own, so to say that the audiobook was a huge help would be an understatement. The narration kept me engaged with the story as well.

            The appeal for Gideon the Ninth have been positive. Not only has the book, and the author, received a lot of fan and critical acclaim, but also has been nominated for several awards including the Nebula and the Hugo Awards. I can see how this book can become part of the (dark) fantasy canon and how it will have lasting appeal. However, this book neither was worth the hype nor was the best debut novel I’ve read. I’m not the only bookblogger who feels this way about this book. Then again, I’m not saying that you shouldn’t read it. The story itself kept my interest to the end; enough so that I want to read the sequel, Harrow the Ninth, when it is released in September 2020. This book wasn’t my favorite one, but my interest is piqued to where I’m okay with rereading parts of Gideon the Ninth in order to understand the sequel.

            Gideon the Ninth is an ambitious debut which hits enough marks to make for a good and fun reading experience. While I did not enjoy this book as much as other bookbloggers, the story and the world intrigued me enough to finish this book and wanting to read the sequel. Please understand that just because I didn’t enjoy this book doesn’t mean that you’ll feel the same way. That being said, if you want to read a story about necromancers and sword fighting, with gothic elements, then this book is for you.

My Rating: Read It (3.5 out of 5). 

Works Cited 

Abrams, M.H., and Geoffrey Galt Harpham. A Glossary of Literary Terms. 10th ed., Wadsworth, 

            2012. 

Why You Need to Read: “The Stone Sky”

The Broken Earth 3: The Stone Sky

By: N.K. Jemisin

Published: August 15, 2017

Genre: Science Fiction/Dystopian/Fantasy

*Winner of the Hugo Award for Best Novel 2018, Winner of the Nebula Award for Best Novel 2017, Winner of the Locus Award for Best Novel 2018*

            The job you “have” to do is the easier of the two, you think. Just catch the Moon. Seal the Yumenes Rifting. Reduce the current Season’s predicted impact from thousands or millions of years back down to something manageable—something the human race has a chance of surviving. End the Fifth Seasons for all time.

            The job you “want” to do, though? Find Nassun, your daughter. Take her back from the man who murdered your son and dragged her halfway across the world in the middle of the apocalypse, (1: you, in waking and dreaming). 

            N.K. Jemisin has done what very few authors have managed to do, present a good and believable ending to a series that leaves readers with a sense of both accomplishment and satisfaction. What started with The Fifth Season and continued through The Obelisk Gate ends with The Stone Sky, the third and final book in The Broken Earth Trilogy. Readers and critics learn what must be done in order to put an end to an apocalypse. 

            The protagonists are once again Essun and Nassun, mother and daughter, and two of the most powerful orogenes in the world right now. Both mother and daughter have made their choices regarding themselves: Essun decided to grow her powers to the fullest, and Nassun decided to identify herself as an orogene. And, both mother and daughter have to live with the consequences of their decisions—both physical and emotional. All that’s left is for the two orogenes to determine the path of the Moon. One orogene and her companions hope to save the world, while the other orogene is coaxed by her companions to destroy it. Mother and daughter will face off after they’re reunited. Essun just wants to know whether or not her 10-year-old daughter is traumatized, and Nassun wants the world to know that those with power can and will determine the ways of the world. The daughter has become as powerful as her mother, and her mother isn’t with her to provide guidance. 

            The plot of the story is a race to an underground network in order to restore “order” to the Earth. This can be achieved with orogeny and there are 2 orogenes who are powerful enough to restart it. So, who will get there first? And, what will happen once the obelisks are activated? Another plot of the story involves Essun and Nassun preparing for action when the Moon is closest to them in “orbit.” Essun has succeeded in activating the Gate while at the comm, and Nassun travels to one that’s been lost and forgotten to history. There are two subplots in this story which answers some of the remaining questions in the trilogy. The first subplot is the origin of the Stone Eaters, which leads to how the Seasons became so dangerous. The second subplot answers the question regarding the purpose of the Guardians and their relation to the Seasons. These subplots are necessary because they provide the bits of information required for the plot’s development and resolution.

            The narrative continues to shift between 1st, 2nd and 3rd points-of-view. And, the sequence falls back into flashbacks and present time. The flashbacks provide both background information and answers to the questions to how everything came to be and how it will all end. The streams-of-consciousness of all the characters make them all reliable narrators. Yes, not all of their motivations are morally good, but it’s understandable given the circumstances. These elements of the narrative make it easy to follow. 

            The style N.K. Jemisin uses for The Stone Sky tells that an end is coming. Now, whether or not that end is for the Seasons, or for the characters, or both is to be determined. But first, the author lets the audience know how the Seasons came about. At the same time, Jemisin lets her readers know that oppression of any form does not ensure safety and/or order within a society. Instead, fear and suppression take place, which can lead either to a life of secrecy or to a life full of anger. The mood in this story is one of readiness—the need to make it on time to save the world, to save the last surviving member of one’s family, and to finish preparations in order to survive the Seasons. The tone in the novel is dread due to the choices and consequences of saving the world and reuniting with estranged loved ones. However, if it came down to two possibilities, then which choice would you make? This is what the author has her characters do, they must make a choice and live, or die, with the consequences. 

             The appeal for The Stone Sky have been massive and monumental! Not only did this novel win the Nebula Award (2017) and the Locus Award (2018) for Best Novel, but also won the Hugo Award for Best Novel (2018)! This means that The Broken Earth Trilogy has won the Hugo Award in the same category in three consecutive years! N.K. Jemisin is the first author to accomplish this feat; and, it’s well-deserved! The Broken Earth Trilogy is not only a must read for readers of speculative fiction, but also is a magnificent work of literature overall. There have been people who’ve read this series and found it to be an excellent story regardless of its genre. The message of the cost and the resistance that results from oppression and the end-of-the-world is received—although it’s not practiced in our world, yet—and is the reality within the fiction. The Stone Sky completes this trilogy and is a must read within the canon of speculative fiction.

            The Stone Sky is a strong and powerful end to this ambitious trilogy. N.K. Jemisin has managed to raise the expectations and the standards of writing and presenting a work of speculative fiction. This book series is one of my all-time favorites. Not to mention, I’ll be re-reading and recommending these books for years to come! Everyone needs to read this amazing trilogy!

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!!!

My Shortlist Award Reading Challenge 2020

Yes, I am late with this post, but that doesn’t mean I haven’t been keeping up with the news surrounding the nominees for this year’s speculative fiction awards. The good news is that thanks to all of my reading throughout the previous year, I’ve read a lot of the books that have been nominated for these awards. The bad news is that all of the conventions have been cancelled due to the COVID-19 Pandemic. The silver lining is that many of these Cons and awards will be presented through livestream events. Yet, I feel sad for many of the nominees, especially the debut authors, because they will not be able to accept the award and give their acceptance speech in person. At the same time, I know some of these Cons are open to fans, and a lot of them had to cancel their plans as well. It does make the livestreams good enough substitutes and next year’s Cons will make up for it all, but it’s still a bummer. 

            Like I said, I read a lot of the nominees for almost all of this year’s speculative fiction awards. If you click on this Google Document that I’ve shared (https://docs.google.com/document/d/1G2uYVlAPclCA83KYOb3n5G-xLfW5xza5HT50dz5uX4Y/edit?usp=sharing), then you’ll find which books I’ve been able to review so far. However, I’ve read enough of the nominees—mostly novels and novellas—to know that it’ll be another close year in terms of the winner. I have my picks of who is going to win, but in most cases, I can’t determine who the winner(s) will be. Nevertheless, I’m excited for all of these speculative fiction awards. Fans and readers should not only pay attention to the Nebulas and the Hugos, but also to the British Science Fiction Association, or BSFA, the Aurealis Awards, and the Nommo Awards (to start). On a serious note, there’s a lot more going on in Australia, in Africa, and within their writing communities than those of us residing in the rest of the continents can comprehend. 

            As for the awards themselves (some of them), both the nominations and the dates of them have been delayed. For example, the BSFA Awards were supposed to be in April during Eastercon, but the event was postponed until May. Those awards will be livestreamed this weekend (check their website for the link). It seems that most of these awards will be streamed, but we’ll have to consult the Awards’ websites and social media pages for information and dates. This experience will be memorable, and we won’t miss them. 

            Just like last year, I’ll update my Google Doc as both the nominations and the winners are announced. I’ll share any information on whether or not the awards will be streamed and when they’ll occur on social media. I suggest you follow any information provided by the award organizations themselves on their websites, which are listed below. Read or watch the nominated works as well. And, look out for my post on the wrap up of my Reading Challenge, which will be posted towards the end of the award season (whenever that is). Please note: the S.P.F.B.O. 6 will be mentioned in separate posts! Let me know which of the nominees you’ve read! Enjoy this year’s awards and nominations! 

            If any of the information listed below is incorrect, then please let me know.

Philip K. Dick: https://www.philipkdickaward.org

BSFA: https://bsfa.co.uk 

Nebula: https://nebulas.sfwa.org

Aurealis: https://aurealisawards.org

Brave New Words: https://www.starburstmagazine.com

Hugos: http://www.thehugoawards.org

Lambda Literary: https://www.lambdaliterary.org

Compton Crook: http://www.bsfs.org 

Otherwise (formerly the Tiptree Award): https://otherwiseaward.org 

The Kitschies: http://www.thekitschies.com

BFA: http://www.britishfantasysociety.org

Locus Awards: https://locusmag.com

Arthur C. Clarke Award: https://clarkeaward.com

Nommo Award: http://www.africansfs.com/home

Bram Stoker Awards: http://www.thebramstokerawards.com

World Fantasy Award: http://www.worldfantasy.org/

The Shortlist Award Reading Challenge 2019—The End

            As some of you may or may not know, I decided to partake of this crazy reading challenge in which, I would read as many of the nominees of the largest book awards for speculative fiction I could by the time the winners were announced. Obviously, this was easier said than done, but I did read a lot of amazing books, and many of them did NOT win the awards. In addition, I learned of more awards that were given to these authors in different regions throughout the world—if anyone knows of an award given in Asia, then please let me know—and I learned more about authors I’ve read or haven’t read before. 

            I suggest that you go to the websites for these awards and take a look at all of the finalists because you might recognize the authors, their works and their other interested. Some of these authors only receive the recognition from these awards. And, I wouldn’t have known who Lauren C. Teffeau and Nick Clark Windo were without doing this project. 

            I did read a lot of the winners and the nominees, but only the winners of each award and category will be listed here. I haven’t written all of the reviews for some of the winners, yet; but, I hope to do so in the near future. Please read my reviews I’ve linked to the books, and let me know what you thought of the winners of these awards. And yes, I’m doing this again for 2020!

Philip K. Dick Award

Winner: 84K by Claire North

Compton Crook/Stephen Tall Award

Honors the Best 1st Science Fiction/Fantasy/Horror Novel of the Year

Winner: The Poppy War by R.F. Kuang

British Science Fiction Association (BSFA) Award

Winners:

            Novel: Embers of War by Gareth L. Powell

            Shorter Fiction: Time Was by Ian McDonald

            Non-Fiction: “On motherhood and erasure: people-shaped holes, hollow characters and the illusion of impossible adventures” by Aliette de Bodard

            Artwork: Likhain’s “In the Vanishers’ Palace: Dragon I and II”

Nebula Awards

Winners:

            Novel: The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal

            Novella: The Tea Master and the Detective by Aliette de Bodard

            Novelette: “The Only Harmless Great Thing” by Brooke Bolander

            Short Story: “The Secret Lives of the Nine Negro Teeth of George Washington” by Phenderson Djèlí Clark

            Game Writing: “Black Mirror: Bandersnatch,” Charlie Brooker

            The Ray Bradbury Award for Outstanding Dramatic Presentation: “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse,” Screenplay by Phil Lord & Rodney Rothman

            The Andre Norton Award for Outstanding Young Adult Science Fiction or Fantasy Book: Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi

The Hugo Awards

Winners: 

            Novel: The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal

            Novella: Artificial Condition by Martha Wells

            Novelette: “If at First You Don’t Succeed, Try, Try Again” by Zen Cho

            Short Story: “A Witch’s Guide to Escape: A Practical Compendium of Portal Fantasies” by Alix E. Harrow

            Series: Wayfarers by Becky Chambers

            Related Work: Archive of Our Own, a project of the Organization for Transformative Works

            Graphic Story: Monstress, Volume 3: Haven, written by Marjorie Liu, art by Sana Takeda

            Dramatic Presentation:

                                                Long Form: “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”

                                                Short Form: “The Good Place: Janet”

            Editor:

                        Short Form: Gardner Dozois

                        Long Form: Navah Wolfe

            Professional Artist: Charles Vess

            Semiprozine: “Uncanny Magazine”   

            Fanzine: “Lady Business”

            Fancast: “Our Opinions Are Correct”

            Fan Writer: Foz Meadows

            Fan Artist: Likhain (Mia Sereno)

            Art Book: The Books of Earthsea: The Complete Illustrated Edition, illustrated by Charles Vess, written by Ursula K. LeGuin   

            Lodestar Award for Best Young Adult Book: Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi

            John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer: Jeannette Ng

Brave New Words Award

Given to an individual who produces break-out literature that is New and Bold.

Winner: Empire of Sand by Tasha Suri

The Arthur C. Clarke Award

Given for Science Fiction Literature

Winner: Rosewater by Tade Thompson

Locus Awards

Winners: 

            Science Fiction Novel: The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal

            Fantasy Novel: Spinning Silver by Naomi Novik

            Horror Novel: The Cabin at the End of the World by Paul Tremblay

            Young Adult Book: Dread Nation by Justina Ireland

            First Novel: Trail of Lightning by Rebecca Roanhorse

            Novella: Artificial Condition by Martha Wells

            Novelette: “The Only Harmless Thing” by Brooke Bolander

            Short Story: “The Secret Lives of the Nine Negro Teeth of George Washington” by Phenderson Djèlí Clark

            Anthology: The Book of Magic edited by Gardner Dozois

            Collection: How Long ‘til Black Future Month? By N.K. Jemisin

            Magazine: Tor.com

            Publisher: Tor

            Editor: Gardner Dozois

            Artist: Charles Vess

            Non-Fiction: Ursula K. LeGuin: Conversations on Writing by Ursula K. LeGuin & David Naimon

            Art Book: Charles Vess, The Books of Earthsea: The Complete Illustrated Edition, Ursula K. LeGuin

British Fantasy Awards

Winners:

            Fantasy Novel: The Bitter Twins by Jen Williams

            Horror Novel: Little Eve by Catriona Ward

            Newcomer: Tasha Suri for Empire of Sand

            Novella: The Tea Master and the Detective by Aliette de Bodard

            Short Fiction: “Down Where Sound Comes Blunt” by GV Anderson

            Anthology: Year’s Best Weird Fiction, Vol. 5, edited by Robert Shearman & Michael Kelly

            Collection: All the Fabulous Beasts by Priya Sharma

            Non-Fiction: Noise and Sparks by Ruth EJ Booth

            Independent Press: Unsung Stories 

            Magazine/Periodical: “Uncanny Magazine

            Audio: Breaking the Glass Slipper (www.breakingtheglassslipper.com)

            Comic/Graphic Novel: Widdershins, Vol. 7 by Kate Ashwin

            Artist: Vince Haig

            Film/Television Production: “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”

2019 World Fantasy Awards

Lifetime Achievement Awards: Hayao Miyazaki, Jack Zipes

Winners:

            Novel: Witchmark by C.L. Polk

            Novella: “The Privilege of the Happy Ending” by Kij Johnson

            Short Fiction (tie): “Ten Deals with the Indigo Sky” by Mel Kassel

                                           “Like a River Loves the Sky” by Emma Törzs

            Collection: The Tangled Lands by Paolo Bacigalupi & Tobias S. Buckell

            Artist: Rovina Cal

            Special Award:

                        Professional: Huw Lewis-Jones for The Writer’s Map: An Atlas of Imaginary Lands

                        Non-Professional: Scott H. Andrews for Beneath Ceaseless Skies: Literary Adventure Fantasy

            Anthology: Worlds Seen in Passing: Ten Years of Tor.com Short Fiction, edited by Irene Gallo

Bram Stoker Awards (2018)

Superior Achievement in a Novel: The Cabin at the End of the World by Paul Tremblay

Superior Achievement in a First Novel: The Rust Maidens by Gwendolyn Kiste

Superior Achievement in a Young Adult Novel: The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein by Kiersten White

Superior Achievement in a Graphic Novel: Victor LaValle’s Destroyer by Victor LaValle

Superior Achievement in Long Fiction: The Devil’s Throat (Hellhole: An Anthology of Subterranean Terror)

Superior Achievement in Short Fiction: “Mutter” (Fantastic Tales of Terror) by Jess Landry

Superior Achievement in a Fiction Collection: That Which Grows Wild by Eric J. Guignard

Superior Achievement in a Screenplay: The Haunting Hill House: The Bent-Neck Lady, Episode 01:05 by Meredith Averill

Superior Achievement in an Anthology: The Devil and the Deep: Horror Stories of the Sea by Ellen Datlow

Superior Achievement in Non-Fiction: It’s Alive: Bringing Your Nightmares to Life by Joe Mynhardt and Eugene Johnson

Superior Achievement in a Poetry Collection: The Devil’s Dreamland by Sara Tantlinger

Aurealis Award (2018)

Recognizes the achievements of Australian science fiction, fantasy and horror writers. 

Winners:

            Young Adult Short Story: “The Sea-Maker of Darmid Bay” by Shauna O’Meara

            Young Adult Novel: Catching Teller Crow by Ambelin Kwaymullina & Ezekiel Kwaymullina

            Science Fiction Novel: Lifel1k3 by Jay Kristoff

            Fantasy Novel (tie): City of Lies by Sam Hawke

                                             The Witch Who Courted Death by Maria Lewis

            Horror Novel: Tides of Stone by Kaaron Warren

            Children’s Fiction: The Endsister by Penni Russon

            Graphic Novel/Illustrated Work: Tales from The Inner City by Shaun Tan

            Horror Novella: Crisis Apparition by Kaaron Warren

            Horror Short Story: “Sub-Urban” by Alfie Simpson

            Fantasy Novella: “The Staff in the Stone” by Garth Nix

            Fantasy Short Story: “The Further Shore” by J. Ashley Smith

            Science Fiction Novella: Icefall by Stephanie Gunn

            Science Fiction Short Story: “The Astronaut” by Jen White

            Collection: Tales from The Inner City, edited by Shaun Tan

            Anthology: The Best Science Fiction & Fantasy of the Year, edited by Jonathan Strahan

            The Sara Douglass Book Series Award: Blackthorn & Grim Trilogy by Juliet Mariller

            Convenors’ Award for Excellence (tie):

                        Cat Sparks, The 21st Century Catastrophe: Hyper-capitalism and Severe Climate Change in Science Fiction (PhD exegesis Curtin University)

                        Kim Wilkins, Lisa Fletcher and Beth Driscoll, Genre Worlds: Australian Popular Fiction in the 21st Century (http://www.genreworlds.com)

Nommo Award (2018)

Recognizes the works of speculative fiction by Africans, defined as “science fiction, fantasy, stories of magic and traditional belief, alternative histories, horror and strange stuff that might not fit anywhere else,” awarded by the African Speculative Fiction Society

Winners: 

            Novel (The Ilube Award): Freshwater by Akweake Emezi

            Novella: The Fire Bird by Nerine Dorman

            Short Story: “The Witching Hour” by Ekpeki Oghenechovwe Donald

            Comic or Graphic Novel: Shuri by Nnedi Okorafor

SPFBO (Self-Publishing Fantasy Blog-Off) 2018 (4th

Started by Mark Lawrence, yes THAT one, with the purpose to “shines a light on self-published fantasy. It exists to find excellent books that might otherwise have gone unnoticed.” The contest starts with 300 books and it gradually narrows down to 10 finalists! The judges are readers who are bloggers and vloggers. Note: some of these authors gain a following and some even earn a publishing contract, so don’t ignore these books!

Winner: Orconomics by J. Zachary Pike

Finalists:

            The Gods of Men by Barbara Kloss

            The Purification Era Book One: Sowing by Angie Gricaliunas

            We Ride the Storm by Devin Madson

            Symphony of the Wind by Steven McKinnon

            The Anointed by Keith Ward

            Conspiracy of Magic Book One: Ruthless Magic by Megan Crewe

            Sworn to the Night by Craig Schaefer

            Iconoclasts Book 1: Aching God by Mike Shel

            Out of Nowhere by Patrick LeClerc

Why You Need to Read: “Witchmark”

The Kingston Cycle: Book One: Witchmark

By: C.L. Polk

Published: June 19, 2018

Genre: Fantasy, Historical Fiction, LGBTQ, Mystery, Gaslamp, Military Fantasy

            “She gave no outward sign of her effort, but her Secondary’s knees sagged as she took as much of his strength as she pleased. I shuddered. That would have been me, if I hadn’t escaped. Nothing but a Storm-Singer’s minion, my own gifts dismissed as useless,” (Chapter Two).

            2018 was an immense year for the speculative fiction community. Several novels novellas, short stories, graphic novels, etc. were released, read, and enjoyed by fans and critics alike. In fact, so many works of the genre were released that it was difficult to keep up with all of the new releases. Luckily, recommendations and award nominations forces readers to catch up. That being said, I’m glad I got to read and to rate C.L. Polk’s Witchmark. This novel is one of many that I didn’t get to read when it was released in 2018.

            Dr. Miles Singer—the protagonist—is a psychiatrist and a veteran of the war that just ended between Aeland and Laneer. He is making his rounds when a man stumbles into the hospital carrying a man who claims he’s been poisoned. The dying man—Nick Elliot—calls Dr. Singer, “Starred One” and “Sir Christopher,” then transfers his power to Miles before dying. All of this happens in front of the man who brought Nick Elliot into the hospital—Tristan Hunter. Dr. Singer is worried that his cover is blown and his true identity—Sir Christopher Miles Hensley—is known to both strangers, one of whom is now dead. Dr. Singer and Tristan Hunter must explore the societal world of Aeland in order to solve the mystery of Nick Elliot’s death and what’s causing the hallucinations in the veterans at the hospital. It is revealed that Dr. Miles Singer is from a powerful family of magicians; except, he didn’t inherit the powers of a “mage.” Instead, Miles is a “witch”; he has a lesser power and it is believed, even by him, that all he’s good for is to be a “Secondary,” or an enslaved magical source for mages. Miles—knowing it was either enslavement, or commitment to a witches’ asylum—ran away from home and joined the army, where he used his healing power to become a doctor. Nick Elliot’s death reveals that Miles’ life is in jeopardy. Tristan Hunter is an Amaranthine, a celestial being with more power than any witch or mage. He was sent by his Royal Court to solve a mystery that is tied to Nick Elliot’s murder. During this investigation, Miles is recognized by his younger sister, Grace, who is both a mage and the heir to their family’s legacy, and Miles’ “Superior.” Grace needs Miles’ help to secure an election so that she can make reforms for Secondaries like him. Of the three characters, it is Grace who develops the most and it’s because of all of the revelations uncovered by the trio. This unraveling of political conspiracies presents the corruption and the fear that led to Miles fleeing his previous life. Yet, it is more than Miles, Tristan, and Grace knew about beforehand. 

            The plot involves a mystery within this fantasy story. Nick Elliot knew he was dying, and he sought out Dr. Miles Singer. In his last moments Nick Elliot says, “They needed the souls,” and transfers his power and his soul to Miles. Tristan Hunter is from another realm and he’s trying to solve the mystery of these lost souls. Miles, in keeping with appearances, attends a dinner in which he is reacquainted with his sister, Grace, who thought he was dead. Miles now has to solve a mystery, stay away from his family to avoid bondage, and make sure that none of his patients become mass murderers due to their PTSD. Meanwhile, sparks fly between Miles and Tristan, which is an issue. Not because of the homosexuality—the magic world is open to all forms of sexuality—but because relationships between mages and witches, and Amaranthines are taboo. The romance is as beautiful as it is described by the author and is appropriate for an alternative Edwardian English society. Even though this is a fantasy, the mystery is central to the plot of the novel. In other words, Witchmark is a mystery novel set in a fantasy world. Once this is comprehended by the reader(s), then the plot begins to make more sense and continues at an appropriate pace. Besides the romance, the societal world of Aeland is the subplot of this novel. The author wants the reader to know that the magic world is just as power hungry, corrupt, and prejudice as the human world. And, similar to other subplots in other novels, this subplot will not be resolved by this novel’s end but will become ubiquitous to everyone living in those societies. The denizens have to decide whether or not it should be resolved. 

            The narrative follows Miles’ P.O.V. Throughout the novel, Miles’ feelings and emotions about his past, his family his career, his choices, and his love for Tristan presents the narrative to be stream-of-consciousness. All of Miles’ thoughts, fears, and knowledge is presented to the reader. It is through him that the readers learn about the setting, the magic world and its rules, and the multiple conflicts. Miles being a victim of his family’s and society’s abuse make him both a sympathetic and a reliable narrator. The fact that Miles uncovers more of what has been happening in secret as he unravels Nick Elliot’s murder and the horrors that lead up to it allows the readers to have a mirrored reaction to Miles’. As long as readers remember that the novel is both fantasy and mystery, the narrative is easy to follow. 

            The style of writing C.L. Polk uses makes her debut novel captivating. First, incorporating PTSD in the veterans of the war provides realism to the readers. Miles being a psychiatrist during an era in which both the medical community and public society chastised such notions surrounding mental health and war veterans is commendable. Next, magic systems and hierarchy are part of both the plot and the mystery in this story. Secondaries being seen as a source for magic for mages provides a different outlook on magic and its societal norms. Polk’s tone of this “magic system” reflects English history and how they always felt they had to conquer another group of people in order to feel powerful. The mood within the novel illustrate why Miles—and other Secondaries—fled their homes. This magic world is as corrupt and stringent as ours, but with harsher abuses of power. Last, Polk’s writing is as much of a political statement as it is an immersive fantasy story. And, magical gifts are as essential as the witch, or the mage who wields it.

            The appeal surrounding Witchmark is well-deserved. Polk does an amazing job of combining history, psychology, mystery and romance into this all-around fantasy novel. It’s been nominated for several literary awards including the 2019 Nebula Award for Best Novel and the 2019 Lambda Literary, or Lammy, Award for Best LGBTQ SF/F/Horror (Book). This lets speculative fiction fans know that this book should be read. The follow-up to Witchmark, Stormsong, will pick up where the last novel left off. This will let readers—who are interested—know whether or not the author will build-up on her world. I hope she does because it will let us know what happens next. Witchmark is an amazing addition to the literary canon! 

            C.L. Polk’s debut novel is a multi-genre text that can be read and enjoyed by readers, and not just fantasy fans. Witchmark provides a beautiful romance readers of all sexualities can relate to including the numerous mentions of marriage. The balance between fantasy and mystery presents Witchmark as a unique reading experience to everyone who reads it. The characters, the plot, the narrative, the setting, and the style fit together as you continue reading the story. You will find this book to be as enjoyable as I did, with the reminder that magic is what the user makes of it.

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!

Why You Need to Read: “Trail of Lightning”

The Sixth World: Book One: Trail of Lightning

By: Rebecca Roanhorse

Published: June 26, 2018

Genre: Science Fiction, Native American Literature, Dystopian, Post-Apocalyptic, Folklore

NOTE:Understand that any incorrect use and/or spelling surrounding the culture mentioned is unintentional.

            “But I’m no hero. I’m more of a last resort, a scorched-earth policy. I’m the person you hire when the heroes have already come home in body bags,”(Chapter 1).

            There are numerous ways readers find out about which books to read by which authors: school assignments, friends and family, book clubs, random recommendations, the Internet, etc. In this case, it was from the 2018 Hugo Awards. One of the awards presented—the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer—announced its winner…Rebecca Roanhorse. If anyone watched my reaction video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oyX_U2U8kE&t=11s), then you know that I was shocked upon hearing this announcement because I believed either Katherine Arden, or Jeanette Ng should have won that award. Yet, I never heard of Rebecca Roanhorse, or her stories, before, and she did win a Hugo for Best Short Story that same evening. Suddenly, I had a new author to read and her debut novel is titled: Trail of Lightning. And, I’ll admit, I was wrong about my assumption!

            Maggie Hoskie is the protagonist. She is a survivor of a climate apocalyptic event known as “The Big Water,” when the water levels rose and engulfed most of the Earth’s terrain and its inhabitants. After this event, the Navajo Gods, heroes and monsters returned to Earth and to humanity. One of the gods, Neizghání a.k.a. “Monsterslayer,” trains Maggie to become a Monsterslayer like himself. When Neizghání suddenly leaves Maggie, she is able to accept jobs for her handiwork. Maggie’s skills as both a survivor and a monster hunter reflect all of the emotional traumas she’s experienced. However, when a job becomes something more than she can handle, Maggie, reluctantly, agrees to work with Kai Arviso, a medicine man who is also unsure about his supernatural abilities. Throughout the story, readers learn about Maggie and Kai’s past lives including how they survived the flood and how their supernatural abilities are both assisting and restraining them. Other characters, such as Kai’s grandfather, Grandpa Tah, notice how the relationship between Maggie and Kai could be a good thing for the survival of their community, but in a post-apocalyptic world, one should know better than to hope for such a thing. 

            The plot of the story is Maggie and Kai searching Dinétah (the Navajo reservation) for the source of dark magic that’s hunting the surviving humans. The subplot, which will probably carry over to the next book, is the concept surrounding “clan powers.” Clan powers are gifts from the “Holy People” and the gods to mortals. Maggie isn’t a fan of her gift and Kai views his only as a way to survive. However, readers—and Maggie—don’t know what Kai’s gift(s) is, so there is that small mystery to consider. Maggie’s superhuman abilities are not what she would call a blessing from the Diyín Dine’é (people with supernatural powers). Yet, Maggie uses her gifts to make a life for herself. This subplot comes up again throughout the novel, and it is safe to say that this subplot won’t be resolved as quickly as the plot. Both the plot and the storyline of Maggie’s training go hand-in-hand. This is because readers learn how Maggie became acquainted with the gods and how to harness her gifts to become a Monsterslayer. At the same time, we learn about Maggie’s friends and her relationships with other people living in Dinétah. The plot development is appropriate for this story, allowing it to unfold through the characters. 

            The narrative in Trail of Lightningis 1stperson point-of-view from Maggie’s perspective. The sequence begins and ends with murder and the protagonist’s reaction to each one, which is the same reaction, indifference. However, by the end of the novel, Maggie’s reaction makes a lot of sense. Maggie is a reliable narrator who tells Kai and his grandfather her past and how she survived the first wave of chaos after “The Big Water,” many of which she is not proud of doing. Maggie recounting her past actions through flashback allows the author to present her protagonist as flawed and traumatized, yet relatable. This narrative lets readers follow Maggie’s story—both the present and the past—with ease. 

            Rebecca Roanhorse depicts Navajo Gods when an ethnic group of people would need them the most, after an apocalyptic event. While the retelling of gods, heroes and legends are similar to Neil Gaiman and Rick Riordan, Rebecca Roanhorse has the gods of her ancestors return to Earth when the lifestyle of humanity reverts. Many myths and folklore tell of a simple lifestyle, when humans needed the gods to survive. This style of writing lets readers know that the lifestyle changes, but the culture doesn’t. As long as humanity thrives, so will their gods. The author’s tone within the novel, humanity’s failure of taking care of Earth, reflects the mood, an urban apocalypse where everything has to be rebuilt in order to achieve a sense of normalcy. In addition, Rebecca Roanhorse incorporates Navajo diction for both authenticity and reality, with an explanation (and translation) of each meaning. If other cultures incorporate words of their own into everyday language, then why not learn Navajo ones?

            The appeal surrounding Trail of Lightninghave been very positive. Called, “one of the Greatest Science Fiction & Fantasy Debut Novels Ever Written,” by Barnes & Noble, this novel received praise for the portrayal of Native American (one tribe) culture, too. Not to mention, Trail of Lightninghas been nominated for both the Nebula and the Hugo Awards. The follow-up to Trail of LightningStorm of Locustswill be released in April 2019. And, the author’s YA debut, Race to the Sun, which is part of the Rick Riordan PresentsUniversal Literary Pantheon, will be released in Fall 2019. This will expand Roanhorse’s readers and her universe, explaining the Dine’é to the rest of the world. Obviously, I’m looking forward to reading both novels. 

            Trail of Lightningis a brilliant debut novel that allows for an immersive story about Native Americans—Navajo—and their culture and folklore in an ironic apocalyptic urban fiction book. This narrative is slow at times because the world-building overtakes the pacing. I believe the next book in the series and any other one set in this universe will be just as memorable as the first one. I believe Rebecca Roanhorse will be publishing stories for many years to come, and I will read them all. 

My Rating: Enjoy It (4 out of 5). 

An Update on My Shortlist Award Reading Challenge 2019

On Tuesday, April 2nd, the nominees for the 2019 Hugo Awards were announced, and just like everyone in the SFF Community, I was excited over all of the nominees and offered my congratulations (and consolations) to the authors, artists, editors and other nominees. The good news is, once again the nominees of the Nebulas and the Hugos contain different selections within each category, which means there are different works to consider for each category. In other words, someone who wasn’t nominated for a Nebula was nominated for a Hugo! The bad news is, I’m still reading (and watching) my way through these nominees. I’m going to have to start being realistic about how I’m going to present my predictions for the upcoming awards.

            One of the issues about reading the nominations for literary awards is the actual reading of them. Time and money are the usual suspects as to why I’m falling behind on the reading. However, I can say that I fell behind in the reading of some of these nominations because I’m behind on the series. Dave Hutchinson, Yoon Ha Lee and Emma Newman are nominated for some of the awards for their novels that are part of a series. Unlike Nnedi Okorafor, Martha Wells and Seanan McGuire, reading novels takes longer than reading a novella. And, while I’ll be working my way through both Yoon Ha Lee’s and Becky Chambers’ series in time for the Hugo Awards Presentation, I won’t be able to complete them in time for the BSFA Awards. That being said, the nominations for “Best Novel” are just as puzzling as the “Best Novel” nominations for the rest of the awards, the novels/series are that good.   

            Another issue I’ve been having is the access to the stories themselves. I’ve been making numerous trips to the public libraries in my neighborhood and in the neighboring neighborhoods. Amazon Unlimited—Amazon’s digital library service—has been a huge help, as well as the many sales on e-books both Amazon and Barnes & Noble have had since January. However, many of the short stories and the novelettes are not as easy to access as you may think. Some of the nominees are available online for free by the publisher or the magazine that published them. The rest are not even available to purchase online unless you buy the entire issue the story was featured in. As of right now, I don’t know what I’ll do as each awards presentation gets closer. 

Please keep in mind that I’m doing the Reading Challenge. I know about the nominations in the categories involving movies, television shows and video games. I’m working my way through those as well and I’ll give my predictions on those potential winners, too.  

            In terms some of the other awards, I tweeted a message to The Arthur C. Clarke Award Committee. They said that their awards ceremony will take place in July 2019, although the dates are still TBD. I want to say that we’ll probably get their nominations either at the end of April, or at the beginning of May. I don’t know which books will be selected for their nominations, but it wouldn’t surprise me if some of the nominees for the other awards are selected for this one. I’m looking forward to The Arthur C. Clarke Awards because their nominations are made up of both familiar and new names, as well as series a reader—such as myself—might have overlooked. I should also mention that as I’m posting this update, the nominations for the 2019 Locus Awards have not been announced yet. If there are any other awards I should look into, then please let me know. 

            On Monday, April 15th, the winner of the 2019 Compton Crook/Stephen Tall Award will be announced, but the award will not be presented to that winner until Balticon 53, which is taking place after this year’s Nebula Awards Presentation. I have either read or read most of the books of all the nominees. I have an idea of who my pick for this award is going to be, but that doesn’t mean that the author I choose is going to win. This will be the first of my awards videos I plan on making and uploading to YouTube. I can say all of the nominees on this list are worth reading, especially because three of the authors are nominated for other speculative fiction literary awards. However, this does not mean that the other three nominees should be overlooked. I have a feeling that we’ll receive more intriguing stories from them for a very long time. 

            That’s my update. I’ll be reading and posting my reviews and updates about each award presentation as they come and go. I’m making progress with my reading and I’m excited and conflicted about this year’s nominees. This means that many of the stories the authors have gifted readers with are that good, so it’ll be hard to determine just one winner. I’ve heard of ties happening in some cases and I doubt that it could happen this year, but you never know. 

Why You Need to Read: “The Poppy War”

The Poppy War Series: Book 1: The Poppy War

By: R.F. Kuang

Published: May 1, 2018

Genre: Fantasy, Historical Fiction, Folklore, and Military

PLEASE NOTE: The following contains minor spoilers from this novel. You have been warned.

            “Who are the gods? Where do they reside? Why do they do what they do? These are the fundamental questions of Lore. I can teach you more than ‘ki’ manipulation. I can show you the pathway to the gods. I can make you a shaman.”

            Gods and shamans? It was often difficult to tell when Jiang was joking and when he wasn’t, but he seemed genuinely convinced that he could talk to heavenly powers. 

            She was admittedly fascinated by myths and legends, and the way Jiang made them sound real.(Chapter 6).

            This debut novel caught my attention during one of my browsing visits to Barnes & Noble. My interest in this novel piqued when I read the synopsis of the book, and that fans of Katherine Arden would enjoy it, too. The Poppy Waris often described as a fantasy folklore historical military fiction novel, but it is so much more than that. Readers are treated to a blend of Chinese culture, memorable characters, and the horrors of war. 

            The protagonist of this novel, Runin Fang, or Rin, has readers comparing her to Harry Potter; but this story is NOT about an orphan who learns of his or her heritage and is given the opportunity to attend a school. Rin is an orphan of the last Poppy War who is raised by a family of opium dealers. Rin studies for the entrance exam to Sinegard—the most elite military school in the country—in order to escape poverty and an arranged marriage. When Rin is accepted into Sinegard, we meet her classmates: Kitay, Venka, Niang, Negha, Altan, etc.; her instructors including: Jiang, a shaman; and, the members of her Division. 

            The plot of The Poppy Warhas three parts: learning about war, going off to war, and surviving a war. Part I focuses on Rin’s acceptance and placement to Sinegard. I say placement because Rin and her classmates can get expelled or killed at any given moment during their time there. Rin has to deal with the prejudice surrounding her socioeconomic status as well. When she decides to study under Jiang—the Master of Lore—to become a shaman, Rin’s true education begins and her identity is revealed to her. 

            Part II is the beginning of the Third Poppy War. The Twelve Provinces and the Empress gather their soldiers for war, and this includes the instructors and the students from Sinegard. This reflects the reality of war in that the students at the military school go off to war. As the first battle takes place, Rin and her classmates experience the horrors of war, which was NOT taught to them in their classes. During this battle, Rin loses control of her shaman abilities. To the horror of her comrades, commanders and Empress she helps secure victory of the battle. Rin’s nature and heritage are revealed to everyone else, and she is transferred to the “secret” 13thDivision, which is made up of soldiers with their own supernatural abilities.

            Part III reveals more horrors of war through the eyes of Rin’s surviving classmates, and the descriptions provide images that won’t leave the readers’ minds anytime soon. This is the point in the novel that a decision must be made as to how to end the war immediately. And, no matter what is decided, there will be consequences. Yet, it is soon realized that it isn’t that one country is bad and the other is good, or vice versa; no, each side is ruthless and will do anything to ensure survival, including betrayals. 

            The narrative is first person and stream-of-consciousness. Readers witness Rin’s education and decisions through her eyes and understand her reasons behind all of her actions, including the mistakes she makes. It is because of Rin’s mistakes that readers can view her as a reliable narrator. The narrative jumps through time so that the pivotal moments in Rin’s life are presented to the readers. For example, the scenes of Rin’s imprisonment and the siege are told in real time so that readers can comprehend and emphasize with the boredom and the impatience the protagonist and her comrades deal with. Even the scenes illustrating the battles and their aftermath will leave you nauseated and horrified. The narrative is written in a way that all readers can follow. 

            The style Kuang uses throughout the novel reflects its setting. One could argue that The Poppy Waris an allegory of the emergence of nuclear weapons at the end of World War II. The conflict of war within the novel is based on the Second Sino-Japanese War, which occurred between 1937 and 1945. This war was one of the many isolated wars that were ongoing throughout the world during the second quarter of the 20thCentury. While The Poppy Warstarts off with the protagonist wanting an education in order to have a better life, the author follows up that education with an actual war, which changes the mood rather quickly. By the end of the novel, readers understand the tone of the story as well as the decision Rin makes and why it is necessary. 

            The appeal surrounding The Poppy Waris interesting. I say interesting because while I understood both the story and its acclaim, I know readers whom either disliked it, or did not finish it. The reason usually was either “it got too slow,” or “I thought this was a story about a school like Hogwarts.” First of all, not every fantasy book is going to be similar to Harry Potterbecause a “school” is mentioned in its synopsis! Second, Harry Potteris a YA series and The Poppy Waris for adults—go back and re-read Chapter 5! Last, if anyone read either the title, or the synopsis, then you would know that a war breaks out a third of the way within the novel. Instead, think of The Poppy Waras a military fantasy with folklore elements. Both Chinese culture and folklore are explained as part of the world building and the historical context are based on real life events. The explanation of Eastern Shamanism demonstrates the differences and the consequences of having this ability. I have neither read all of the fantasy books with its own version of shamanism, nor know the beliefs of similar concepts throughout the world. But, I can say that this explanation of the Chinese Pantheon is one of the most interesting presentations I have read in a long time. The Poppy Waris nominated for several upcoming literary fantasy awards including the Nebula Award and the Compton Crook/Stephen Tall Award (the Hugo Nominations have not been made during the time of this publication). The sequel, The Dragon Republic, will be released in August 2019. This means readers and critics will be able to enjoy more of R.F. Kuang’s story. 

            The Poppy Waris one of the most critically acclaimed debut novels in the speculative fiction genre in recent years. Fans of Asian history and fiction, military, silkpunk and folklore will enjoy this novel. The Poppy Warmade My Selections for Best Speculative Fiction Books of 2018, which should make you aware of how I feel about this book. It definitely deserves the hype and the award nominations, and I’m looking forward to reading more stories from R.F. Kuang. 

The criticism of the book is not deserved because there are some readers who want all of the books within a genre to be similar to one or two, and that is not fair to the authors and everyone else interested in the genre. One of the purposes of speculative fiction is for authors to tell their stories that go beyond literary fiction and what’s been done before. This allows for both the diversity and the inclusion of many stories, which allows for the expansion of the genre. Kuang is one of those authors and that is why you need to read The Poppy War.

My rating: MUST READ IT NOW! (5 out of 5)