Why You Need to Read: These Books While Waiting for “The Winds of Winter”: Part II

Here we go again. It’s been almost 3 years since I complied the 1st list of book recommendations; and, we’re still waiting for The Winds of Winter, the next book in A Song of Ice and Fire series. Many of us continue to wait, patiently, for this book by reading similar books by authors who write fantasy stories. There have been numerous books released since I compiled my 1st list of recommendations; yet, I know some of the readers enjoyed the latest releases from Brandon Sanderson, Steven Erikson, etc. Within the last decade, several new authors have made a name for themselves through their works, and others have continued to release books for us to enjoy as well.

            This is my 2nd list of book recommendations for those who are waiting for George R.R. Martin to finish and to release the next book in his fantasy series. Please note that I couldn’t include all of the fantasy authors for this list, and there are a few “obvious” authors who are not on this list (i.e. Sanderson, Jordan). I am reading books by Joe Abercrombie and Ben Galley for the first time, so they will be on the next list I compile, hopefully. In addition, if there is an author you don’t see on this list, then please refer to the first one I’ve written and posted. 

  1. The Poppy War Trilogy by R.F. Kuang

This trilogy is a retelling of the Sino-Japanese War (1937-45) and is as grimdark as A Song of Ice and Fire. The story follows Rin, who studies to enroll into a prestigious military university to escape an arranged marriage and poverty. As she studies to become a soldier, Rin studies shamanism, which ignites a power linked to her heritage. Then, a war breaks out and Rin—and her classmates—soon realize that war is NOT what you learn in a classroom.

Based on the speculative fiction books I’ve read so far this series is the most identical to A Song of Ice and Fire. This is because the mood and the tone in both series follow both warfare and social mobility. The politics are the subplot which carries the narrative through the series in both the characters and the conflict.

2. The Daevabad Trilogy by S.A. Chakraborty

Fans of A Song of Ice and Fire have heard of this series because Martin has read this series and praised the author for her storytelling and for the narrative. This trilogy is a retelling of one of the tales from One Thousand and One Arabian Nights, and it is full of political intrigue and backstabbing. The world-building alone will keep you invested in this trilogy.

The trilogy follows 3 protagonists who represent different tribes with overlapping histories. As their heritages are revealed, so are the conflicts amongst those groups of individuals. And then, there are all the “mythical beings” mentioned throughout the series—the ones we heard about in tales such as Aladdin, Sinbad, etc.—play a role as well. In addition, the twists presented throughout the series could rival the ones written by Martin!

3. The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon

The standalone epic fantasy novel has everything A Song of Ice and Fire has in one massive tome: dragons, prophecies, secret societies, political conspiracies, strong female characters, and a historical timeline. While the story follows 3 female protagonists, there are points-of-view chapters from several other characters that will feel familiar to any and all fans of Martin’s series. And, before you ask: yes, there are a TON of references to historical events, many of which you will recall from your school days. 

4. Book of the Ancestor by Mark Lawrence

I would describe this trilogy to fans of Martin as a religious combative school for girls. While the protagonist will remind readers of Arya Stark, I would say these female characters resemble the Free Folk. These characters are strong, intelligent and combative females who are, or are training to become, nuns. 

This trilogy delves into the “idea” and the “expectation” of prophecies—especially the concept of “the chosen one”—how and why they come into existence, when they become relevant, and who they are about. In addition, this series presents a different look into “heritage.” Yes, political and social hierarchy play their roles in the narrative, but both magic and social hierarchy is inherited through blood. So young girls with magical abilities are sought after by these nuns so they can learn about their magic and how it relates to the religion they practice. And yes, there are plenty of battles that present these powers and fighting skills in action.

5. The Nevernight Chronicle by Jay Kristoff

I describe the protagonist in this trilogy as a female Kratos. For those of you who don’t play video games, you will be reminded of a bloodier and an angrier Arya Stark. From the opening pages, you can expect one of the ultimate tales of betrayal, family, vengeance, love, conspiracy, and murder—lots and lots of murder—from this trilogy. 

This trilogy is one-part dark fantasy and one part folklore. The magic in this series is as twisted as the foundation of the school of assassins the protagonist trains and then works for. And, if that’s not enough for you, then know that the footnotes are guaranteed to make you laugh. One final thing to know about this trilogy: IT’S NOT YA!!!

6. The Books of Ambha by Tasha Suri

Some of you might be reading this author’s latest book, The Jasmine Throne, but how many of you read her debut novel, Empire of Sand, and the sequel, Realm of Ash? This duology delves into colonialism, family relationships, colorism, buried history, magic, and political corruption and gameplay. The duology follows 2 sisters—one per book—who are the illegitimate daughters of the governor in a historical and a magical India. The sisters possess magical abilities which are coveted by both the royal family and their mystics. The elder sister reveals her magic, which leads to the mystics separating her from her family, leaving her younger sister behind. Several years later, the younger sister offers her services to the royal family where she learns about the dark history of the Empire and what happened to her sister. 

7. The Nine Realms by Sarah Kozloff

Anyone who is a fan of Tamora Pierce should pick up this series—think of following a strong female protagonist from childhood through early adulthood. This comparison is valid because instead of one thick tome, the author insisted on a binge-reading experience, providing readers with 4 novels: A Queen in Hiding, The Queen of Raiders, A Broken Queen, The Cerulean Queen. The story follows a princess who must live in exile after her mother—the Queen—uncovers a plot for her Council to seize power through the princess. The princess grows up amongst commoners, evades capture from her enemies, and makes allies along the way so that she can reclaim her family’s throne. 

This series will be enjoyed by those who’ve read the Dunk and Egg series (still incomplete). The protagonists travel and reside in the Nine Realms where each realm has its own culture and conflict. All of the plots, the characters and the conflicts revolve around individual realms, politicians, magic, gods, warfare, history and science. And yes, you must read one book after the other in order to grasp the entire experience. 

8. A Chorus of Dragons by Jenn Lyons

If you’re a fan of intricate world-building with matching histories that rival both Tolkien and Martin (yes, I said it), then, this series is for you! This series delves into prophecies, family trees (think of the Lannisters) and magical artifacts as the narration jumps back-and-forth between the past and the present with several characters to tell the story as it progresses. Did I mention the dragons? 

The series follows several characters from different regions of the world whose “circumstances” brings them together in order to save the world as per the prophecies. However, those “prophecies” are questioned by all of the characters—“who came up with them,” “are they relevant right now,” etc.—but, they understand that there is a force that will bring about the end-of-the-world, and they are the ones “chosen” to save it. Note: this is a 5-book series. 

9. The Black Iron Legacy by Gareth Hanrahan

This series started as a 4-book series and was announced recently that it will be a 5-book series. This series is part dark fantasy and part grimdark (NOT THE SAME SUBGENRE) in which the characters within the series who are morally gray must survive a harsh society (that reflect ours) and have a dark portrayal of magic. If the series needs more reason to be read, then know that there will be at least 1 character you will want to learn more about throughout your reading. 

Each book in the series focuses on a cast of characters who end up playing a pivotal role with events in their society, but not in the “traditional fantasy” narrative. Each of the characters have a backstory which in turn influences the reasons for the actions they take (sound familiar?). In addition, the gods—from various cultures throughout the world—are at war with each other for dominance; and, they need “vessels” to assist them with their plans. 

10. The Tide Child Trilogy by R.J. Barker

This series is about pirates, but not the ones from the movies or in real life. Fans of the nautical, and House Greyjoy, will appreciate this unique narrative of sea life and sea dragons. And no, this series is NOT like The Voyage of the “Dawn Treader.” These pirates are on these ships serving because they all committed crimes and were convicted of them.

As you may have guessed, this series isn’t about piracy, but about a crew who is on a mission to protect their home (even though they are no longer welcomed there) and to search for the source of their ships. This series offers an interesting look into life on the seas, which match the harsh lifestyles of the land dwellers. Not to mention, there are plenty of battle sequences that place you right in the middle of it all. This is one of the best nautical fantasy books yet!

11. Chronicles of the Bitch Queen by K.S. Villoso

You are the daughter of the Empire’s most notorious war lord, who on the eve before the coronation with your husband—the would-be king—he abandons you and your young son, which makes you “the Queen” while leaving you to deal with a new kingdom, numerous enemies, and parenthood by yourself. A few years later, your husband asks to meet in order to reconcile, in another country. After an attack by unknown enemies, you find yourself alone in a foreign land with no one to trust and with no way to return home. 

This series presents several political conspiracies which go back to before the protagonist was born. And, the narrative presents realistic scenarios with realistic dilemmas on what the protagonist must do if she wants to survive and to return home. Did I mention the queen is also a kickass warrior? 

12. The Burning by Evan Winter

Both fantasy and folklore mention the origins of dragons as from both Europe and East Asia. That being said, have you ever wondered whether or not dragons could have existed elsewhere (in our world)? Who said dragons couldn’t have come from Africa? If they did, then why haven’t we heard of them until now? 

The 1st book in this quartet—The Rage of Dragons—begins with a battle between 2 tribes—one of them has women who have the power to summon dragons. Then, the story heads in the direction of a military fantasy with a protagonist driven by vengeance (especially against the social hierarchy), which sees the pace of the narrative zoom until you realize that the series is about 2 warring nations and an in tribal struggle amongst social classes and magic users. This series will leave you with a new appreciation for battle sequences.  

13. The Poison War by Sam Hawke

This series is part political fantasy and part mystery. The 1st book in this series—City of Lies—follows a brother and a sister as they try to figure out who murdered the lord they serve and their uncle, who was his closest friend and his poisoner. That’s right, the plot of this novel delves into various poisons. So, fans of Dorne and the Red Viper will find this narrative very intriguing. 

This series delves into the world’s politics, civil war and lost magic. At the same time, the siblings must step into the roles they’ve trained for their entire lives. All the while, who poisoned their uncle and their lord, and why? 

14. The Legacy of the Mercenary Kings by Nick Martell

The newest book on this list focuses on a group of siblings who are struggling to survive after their family was stripped of their status after their father murdered the crown prince, supposedly. The protagonist—who is the younger brother—is determined to prove his father’s innocence. How is he going to do it? By re-entering the royal court and gaining the attention of the royal family, or what’s left of it.

The world in A Song of Ice and Fire has “unusual seasons” and this trilogy has a fractured moon. Fans of the former will enjoy the latter due to the political system, the political backstabbing (and there are A LOT of them), and the political corruption (A LOT of that, too). And, all of that doesn’t compare to the series’ magic system and the twist at the end of the 1st book. 

15. Die by Kieron Gillen, Stephanie Hans, Clayton Cowles, Rian Hughes & Chrissy Williams

I would describe this graphic novel series as a cross between Jumanji and Dungeons and Dragons. The premise of this series follows 6 high schoolers who meet up to play D&D only to disappear for 3 years; then, 5 of them return to our world. 20 years later, the players reunite when a package arrives for them, which returns them back into the “game.” 

So far, this is an on-going series, which narrates the darker side of a fantasy world. The images illustrate the world the main characters are trapped in. However, the story is about these traumatized individuals, their dual personalities, and their desires. Kieron Gillen has written numerous graphic novels, and this series is character driven that is similar to A Song of Ice and Fire. If you’re a fan of this graphic novelist and you haven’t started reading this series, then you’re missing out on an excellent one! 

            As you can see, there is a reason why it took me a while to compile a 2nd list of recommendations. And no, I was not able to add more books and/or series to this list without it being too long. That being said, I am reading my way through other books I hope to recommend in a future post. Hopefully, by then it will be when we’re waiting for A Dream of Spring to be released. Not to mention, many of these “in-progress” series should be completed by that time as well. 

            If it does come to another list, then I hope to have one compiled of books and series by indie authors; and, I believe you have an idea of which ones I might include on that list. And yes, they’ll be another list because there are so many more books to read and to enjoy as we continue to wait for Martin to finish writing his series, patiently.

            Which books and/or series do you recommend reading while waiting for the next book in this series? 

End of 2020 Releases I’m Looking Forward to Reading

By some miracle, we survived to the end of September (2020). It seems that books and video games have managed to remain constant throughout the year—as in some delays and/or minimal postponement. I’m still working my way through my TBR pile as it continues to grow. Fall 2020—September-December—continues the unceasing releases within the literary world (not that I’m complaining). Here are some of the books being released between October and December 2020 I’m excited to read. 

            Please note, I haven’t listed all of the speculative fiction books that will be released by the end of 2020, just the ones I’m hoping to read. If some books are missing, then it’s because either they are part of a series which I haven’t read yet, or I am unaware of their upcoming release. 

Books I’ve Read

Between Earth and Sky #1, Black Sun by Rebecca Roanhorse

            For those of you who haven’t read my review of this book, you should read the book as soon as it’s released because this book doesn’t stop until its end. By the time you’ve reached the end of this book, you’ll realize that there will be a sequel, which will leave you asking: what else can happen? 

Ring Shout by P. Djèlí Clark

            If The Deep looks into the possibilities of the events surrounding the Transatlantic Slave Trade, and Riot Baby is the potential of the future surrounding current racial events, then Ring Shout presents a horror story of the consequences of hatred and violence within a society. Since this is based on U.S. History—a subject that continues to be glossed over—readers can expect Jim Crow Laws, and KKK rallies and attacks in this novella. 

Books I am Reading

The Once and Future Witches by Alix E. Harrow

            This is the second book by Alix E. Harrow. So far, it’s an amazing follow up to The Ten Thousand Doors of January. This time the story follows three sisters who use their magic to obtain the right to vote. So far, I can say that this is a clever look into how misogyny and sexist practices can lead to a small rebellion demanding equality by using unconventional methods, and magic. 

The Hollow Places by T. Kingfisher

            Finally, I’m reading a book by this acclaimed author. In this book, the protagonist is a recently divorced woman who moves into her uncle’s “museum,” only to locate a hidden passage inside the house. However, the length of the passage doesn’t equate to the perimeter of the museum, making her (and us) question as to where the passage leads to and whether or not anyone else knows about it. 

Books To Be Read

Over the Woodward Wall by A. Deborah Baker

            Anyone who has read Middlegame by Seanan McGuire is excited for this book. This book is a companion to Middlegame in that this is the book mentioned throughout the novel. Over the Woodward Wall is the book written by A. Deborah Baker in “code” for anyone who is interested in reaching The Impossible City. Think of it as a fictionalized version of The Secret: A Treasure Hunt.

The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue by V.E. Schwab

            There’s the “age-old” story that serves as a cautionary tale: immortality can be a lonely life. However, what if on top of living forever, no one will remember meeting you? Eternal loneliness is the ultimate sadness, but what if—by some miracle—someone remembers you? That miracle can blossom into the hope the protagonist needs in her immortal life. 

The Midnight Bargain by C.L. Polk

            There are a lot of books about witches and their magic that have been released in 2020. This book by C.L. Polk is the latest of them, as well as the author’s first standalone novel. In a world where women have to choose between magic and marriage, the protagonist seeks a way to have both. 

Eventide by Sarah Goodman

            This historical fantasy focuses on the Orphan Train and the superstitions within a small town. Sisters Lilah and Verity struggle to stay together after the death of their parents. Unfortunately, their family history and the dark forces within the town seek to destroy the siblings like it destroyed their parents. This YA novel is the author’s debut book. 

The Hanged God Trilogy #1, Northern Wrath by Thilde Kold Holdt

            Norse mythology continues to be a source of new fantasy stories, and this debut novel by the author is no different. This epic fantasy occurs when Christianity and Norse folklore clash constantly for dominance. The book follows several characters as they go on a quest to save their gods and Midgard. 

The Burning #2, The Fires of Vengeance by Evan Winter

            The Rage of Dragons started off as an African-inspired military fantasy became something even more by the time readers reached the last quarter of the book. Tau has lost everything he’s cared about at the same time he’s given a promotion that would make anyone else happy. Unfortunately, all Tau has left is his rage. And, although the queen needs his skills to end the war, it’ll take more than anger to get Tau motivated again. What will it take to get him to fight again?

War Girls #2, Rebel Sisters by Tochi Onyebuchi

            War Girls is the realistic dystopian YA novel about the cost of war and how it can affect children before, during and, after a war. Tochi Onyebuchi empathized the emotions felt by his readers throughout the book, especially the ending. Rebel Sisters takes place 5 years after the events of the first book, which sees Ify returning home to Earth. Those of us who read the first book already know to expect our emotions to pour out onto the pages, again. 

The Poppy War #3, The Burning God by R.F. Kuang

            After the release of The Dragon Republic, R.F Kuang announced who Rin, the protagonist, is supposed to represent in this historical military grimdark fantasy. Wow! And, with the way Book 2 ended and what that means for everyone who survived those events, I can only imagine how this trilogy is going to end. The title alone gives a hint as to what readers can expect from this finale. I hope I’m right about this assumption. 

The Graven #1, Nophek Gloss by Essa Hansen

            Hostile aliens, smart ships and humans can be found in this science fiction story. This debut novel follows the protagonist after he loses everything—literally—when his planet is destroyed. On a quest for vengeance, he travels to the home of those who destroyed his planet. Along the way, he learns more about the universe.  

The Tide Child #2, Call of the Bone Ships by R.J. Barker

            The Bone Ships was my surprise book of 2019; and, since I’ve finish it, I’ve been excited to read the sequel. I don’t know whether or not the sequel picks up immediately after the events of the first book, but I know that the subplot continues in this book and it’s going to be very interesting. More voyages ahead for the readers!

Poison Wars #2, Hollow Empire by Sam Hawke

            City of Lies is a great book about political conspiracies, history and folklore, and poisonous plants. Now, with the return of magic within the Empire, will it lead to something positive or to more treachery for the protagonists? We’ll have to wait and read what happens next. 

            Now, will I complete all of these books by the end of this year? Probably not. Yet, I’m aiming to read as many of these books as I can by December 31, 2020. If that doesn’t happen, then I’ll finish reading them in 2021! Which books are you excited to read by the end of 2020?

Why You Need to Read: “City of Lies”

Poison Wars, #1: City of Lies

By: Sam Hawke                                                                      Audiobook: 18 hours 16 minutes

Published: July 3, 2018                                                          Narrated by: Rosa Coduri, Dan Genre: Fantasy                                                                                                         Morgan

                        I was seven years old the first time my uncle poisoned me, (1: Jovan).

            “The Land Down Under,” is also known as the continent, Australia. Australia, New Zealand and Tasmania make up the region with its own flora, fauna and culture. Before The Lord of the Rings movie trilogy, Australia was known for famous people such as Steve Irwin and Huge Jackman, but there have been some notable speculative fiction authors from the continent, too. Both Garth Nix and Juliet Marillier have had their books published in the U.S. since the 1990s, with Kim Wilkins and Jay Kristoff following them in the 2000s, presenting readers with a new spin on the genre. Now, there are two more authors from Australia that have captured everyone’s attention. The first is Devin Madson; and, the other is Sam Hawke, the author of City of Lies, the first book in the Poison Wars series.

            The story follows Jovan and Kalina—brother and sister—who have been training to take over their “Tashi,” their uncle Etan’s position as advisor and protector of the Chancellor (and his heir), as well as a poisoner, someone who tests all of the foods in order to avoid poisoning—both accidental and deliberate. At least Jovan, who is younger, has been training to be their Tashi’s heir. This is because Kalina didn’t pass her uncle’s testing, so she has been finding ways to prove herself to her family, so she doesn’t have to return to the family home away from the Talafan Empire’s capital. While Jovan learns everything about his upcoming role and travels the Empire with the Chancellor’s nephew, Tain, Kalina reads up on everything about the Empire so she can be of use when the time comes. Unfortunately, Jovan, Kalina and Tain are thrust into their roles when their uncles—a member of the Council and the Chancellor—are poisoned and die before Jovan and Kalina can identify the poison and find the antidote for it. From there, Jovan and Kalina must figure out who and what killed their Tashi and the Chancellor, and why. Besides Tain, Jovan and Kalina are accompanied by Marco—a Warrior-Guilder—and, An-Hadrea, a young woman from Losi of the Ash Estates, who meets Jovan and Tain and explains to them about the Darfri, their religion, and their role in the death of the Chancellor. Jovan and Kalina are the protagonists, yet they are able to grow due to their interactions with Tain, Marco and An-Hadrea.

            The plot of the story is two-fold. First, is who poisoned the Chancellor and his advisor. The second is the rebellion that causes a siege within the capital. The questions are: who are the rebels? Are they the lower class? Are they the religious fanatics? What do they hope to accomplish? As these plots unravel and develop, the subplot develops alongside the plot, which is the growth of the roles Jovan, Kalina and Tain take on. Tain is the Chancellor and Jovan must step up into the role of advisor as he aids and protects Tain while solving all of the mysteries behind the poisonings and the rebellion. Meanwhile, Kalina finds her purpose during the siege, and grows into the role she created for herself. The subplots are necessary in this story because it demonstrates how the world—real or fictional—keeps going and the characters have to adapt to the changes in order to survive the larger dilemma. Both the plots and the subplot develop and move at an appropriate pace. 

            The narrative follows the points-of-view of both Jovan and Kalina as the events in the capital of the Talafan Empire unfold from the poisonings to the siege to the revelations of everything that led up to it all. The narrative is told in 1st person and both Jovan and delve into the history and the politics of the Empire as they try to piece together the mystery that led to the deaths of their Tashi and the Chancellor, as well as the current siege. Both brother and sister are reliable narrators as their streams-of-consciousness provide their thoughts and their emotions as everything occurs. Not to mention, the time frame of the narrative provides a realistic approach from traveling through the country to how long military sieges can last. All of these components make the narrative easy to follow. 

            The style Sam Hawk uses is very intriguing. Yes, readers are familiar with multiple P.O.V.s and political backstabbing in such stories; yet, not too many fantasy stories start off as a low fantasy with magic having a “smaller” or a “limited” role within the story. This novel focuses more on the conflict while introducing the magic as a secondary bit of world-building. This is why each chapter opens with a (known) poison to the protagonists and not about the various Guilds or noble families, because the poison used to kill the Chancellor, which leads to all of the events in the story, has to be determined before someone else gets poisoned. The mood of the novel is a conundrum. Everyone is trying to solve several mysteries within a “short” time frame. The tone of the novel is the disclosure of those mysteries and what the revelations of them means for all of the characters affected by the poisonings. 

            The appeal of City of Lies have been positive. While the author has won several awards in Australia, Sam Hawke has received international praise and accolades as well. The author was even nominated for the Astounding Award for Best New Writer, which is given during the Hugo Awards. This novel joins the canon alongside other political fantasies such as A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin and The Kingdom of Liars by Nick Martell. And, with how this story ended, it makes the upcoming sequel—Hollow Empire, to be released in December 2020—an anticipated book of the year.

            I listened to the audiobook, which was narrated by Rosa Coduri and Dan Morgan. Both narrators were excellent as Kalina and Jovan, respectively. However, I was very impressed with how the two narrators seemed to tell the story at the same pace. I’m not sure whether or not the two of them recorded their parts at the same time, but they did an excellent job with keeping the pacing of the story balanced.

            City of Lies is a brilliant debut novel about the realities of politics and society within a fantasy world. Sam Hawke delivers a strong story about dealing with the bigger issues while maintaining composure so that even personal affairs can be handled discreetly. The guide of poisons reminds me of what I learned of plants from gardening and from Girl Scouts. I’m looking forward to reading and to learning more about the magic system in the upcoming sequel. This novel is extremely underrated and should be read by readers and by fans of the fantasy genre. Let us all wait and see what the author gives her readers next!

My Rating: Enjoy It (4.5 out of 5).

The Shortlist Award Reading Challenge 2019—The End

            As some of you may or may not know, I decided to partake of this crazy reading challenge in which, I would read as many of the nominees of the largest book awards for speculative fiction I could by the time the winners were announced. Obviously, this was easier said than done, but I did read a lot of amazing books, and many of them did NOT win the awards. In addition, I learned of more awards that were given to these authors in different regions throughout the world—if anyone knows of an award given in Asia, then please let me know—and I learned more about authors I’ve read or haven’t read before. 

            I suggest that you go to the websites for these awards and take a look at all of the finalists because you might recognize the authors, their works and their other interested. Some of these authors only receive the recognition from these awards. And, I wouldn’t have known who Lauren C. Teffeau and Nick Clark Windo were without doing this project. 

            I did read a lot of the winners and the nominees, but only the winners of each award and category will be listed here. I haven’t written all of the reviews for some of the winners, yet; but, I hope to do so in the near future. Please read my reviews I’ve linked to the books, and let me know what you thought of the winners of these awards. And yes, I’m doing this again for 2020!

Philip K. Dick Award

Winner: 84K by Claire North

Compton Crook/Stephen Tall Award

Honors the Best 1st Science Fiction/Fantasy/Horror Novel of the Year

Winner: The Poppy War by R.F. Kuang

British Science Fiction Association (BSFA) Award

Winners:

            Novel: Embers of War by Gareth L. Powell

            Shorter Fiction: Time Was by Ian McDonald

            Non-Fiction: “On motherhood and erasure: people-shaped holes, hollow characters and the illusion of impossible adventures” by Aliette de Bodard

            Artwork: Likhain’s “In the Vanishers’ Palace: Dragon I and II”

Nebula Awards

Winners:

            Novel: The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal

            Novella: The Tea Master and the Detective by Aliette de Bodard

            Novelette: “The Only Harmless Great Thing” by Brooke Bolander

            Short Story: “The Secret Lives of the Nine Negro Teeth of George Washington” by Phenderson Djèlí Clark

            Game Writing: “Black Mirror: Bandersnatch,” Charlie Brooker

            The Ray Bradbury Award for Outstanding Dramatic Presentation: “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse,” Screenplay by Phil Lord & Rodney Rothman

            The Andre Norton Award for Outstanding Young Adult Science Fiction or Fantasy Book: Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi

The Hugo Awards

Winners: 

            Novel: The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal

            Novella: Artificial Condition by Martha Wells

            Novelette: “If at First You Don’t Succeed, Try, Try Again” by Zen Cho

            Short Story: “A Witch’s Guide to Escape: A Practical Compendium of Portal Fantasies” by Alix E. Harrow

            Series: Wayfarers by Becky Chambers

            Related Work: Archive of Our Own, a project of the Organization for Transformative Works

            Graphic Story: Monstress, Volume 3: Haven, written by Marjorie Liu, art by Sana Takeda

            Dramatic Presentation:

                                                Long Form: “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”

                                                Short Form: “The Good Place: Janet”

            Editor:

                        Short Form: Gardner Dozois

                        Long Form: Navah Wolfe

            Professional Artist: Charles Vess

            Semiprozine: “Uncanny Magazine”   

            Fanzine: “Lady Business”

            Fancast: “Our Opinions Are Correct”

            Fan Writer: Foz Meadows

            Fan Artist: Likhain (Mia Sereno)

            Art Book: The Books of Earthsea: The Complete Illustrated Edition, illustrated by Charles Vess, written by Ursula K. LeGuin   

            Lodestar Award for Best Young Adult Book: Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi

            John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer: Jeannette Ng

Brave New Words Award

Given to an individual who produces break-out literature that is New and Bold.

Winner: Empire of Sand by Tasha Suri

The Arthur C. Clarke Award

Given for Science Fiction Literature

Winner: Rosewater by Tade Thompson

Locus Awards

Winners: 

            Science Fiction Novel: The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal

            Fantasy Novel: Spinning Silver by Naomi Novik

            Horror Novel: The Cabin at the End of the World by Paul Tremblay

            Young Adult Book: Dread Nation by Justina Ireland

            First Novel: Trail of Lightning by Rebecca Roanhorse

            Novella: Artificial Condition by Martha Wells

            Novelette: “The Only Harmless Thing” by Brooke Bolander

            Short Story: “The Secret Lives of the Nine Negro Teeth of George Washington” by Phenderson Djèlí Clark

            Anthology: The Book of Magic edited by Gardner Dozois

            Collection: How Long ‘til Black Future Month? By N.K. Jemisin

            Magazine: Tor.com

            Publisher: Tor

            Editor: Gardner Dozois

            Artist: Charles Vess

            Non-Fiction: Ursula K. LeGuin: Conversations on Writing by Ursula K. LeGuin & David Naimon

            Art Book: Charles Vess, The Books of Earthsea: The Complete Illustrated Edition, Ursula K. LeGuin

British Fantasy Awards

Winners:

            Fantasy Novel: The Bitter Twins by Jen Williams

            Horror Novel: Little Eve by Catriona Ward

            Newcomer: Tasha Suri for Empire of Sand

            Novella: The Tea Master and the Detective by Aliette de Bodard

            Short Fiction: “Down Where Sound Comes Blunt” by GV Anderson

            Anthology: Year’s Best Weird Fiction, Vol. 5, edited by Robert Shearman & Michael Kelly

            Collection: All the Fabulous Beasts by Priya Sharma

            Non-Fiction: Noise and Sparks by Ruth EJ Booth

            Independent Press: Unsung Stories 

            Magazine/Periodical: “Uncanny Magazine

            Audio: Breaking the Glass Slipper (www.breakingtheglassslipper.com)

            Comic/Graphic Novel: Widdershins, Vol. 7 by Kate Ashwin

            Artist: Vince Haig

            Film/Television Production: “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”

2019 World Fantasy Awards

Lifetime Achievement Awards: Hayao Miyazaki, Jack Zipes

Winners:

            Novel: Witchmark by C.L. Polk

            Novella: “The Privilege of the Happy Ending” by Kij Johnson

            Short Fiction (tie): “Ten Deals with the Indigo Sky” by Mel Kassel

                                           “Like a River Loves the Sky” by Emma Törzs

            Collection: The Tangled Lands by Paolo Bacigalupi & Tobias S. Buckell

            Artist: Rovina Cal

            Special Award:

                        Professional: Huw Lewis-Jones for The Writer’s Map: An Atlas of Imaginary Lands

                        Non-Professional: Scott H. Andrews for Beneath Ceaseless Skies: Literary Adventure Fantasy

            Anthology: Worlds Seen in Passing: Ten Years of Tor.com Short Fiction, edited by Irene Gallo

Bram Stoker Awards (2018)

Superior Achievement in a Novel: The Cabin at the End of the World by Paul Tremblay

Superior Achievement in a First Novel: The Rust Maidens by Gwendolyn Kiste

Superior Achievement in a Young Adult Novel: The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein by Kiersten White

Superior Achievement in a Graphic Novel: Victor LaValle’s Destroyer by Victor LaValle

Superior Achievement in Long Fiction: The Devil’s Throat (Hellhole: An Anthology of Subterranean Terror)

Superior Achievement in Short Fiction: “Mutter” (Fantastic Tales of Terror) by Jess Landry

Superior Achievement in a Fiction Collection: That Which Grows Wild by Eric J. Guignard

Superior Achievement in a Screenplay: The Haunting Hill House: The Bent-Neck Lady, Episode 01:05 by Meredith Averill

Superior Achievement in an Anthology: The Devil and the Deep: Horror Stories of the Sea by Ellen Datlow

Superior Achievement in Non-Fiction: It’s Alive: Bringing Your Nightmares to Life by Joe Mynhardt and Eugene Johnson

Superior Achievement in a Poetry Collection: The Devil’s Dreamland by Sara Tantlinger

Aurealis Award (2018)

Recognizes the achievements of Australian science fiction, fantasy and horror writers. 

Winners:

            Young Adult Short Story: “The Sea-Maker of Darmid Bay” by Shauna O’Meara

            Young Adult Novel: Catching Teller Crow by Ambelin Kwaymullina & Ezekiel Kwaymullina

            Science Fiction Novel: Lifel1k3 by Jay Kristoff

            Fantasy Novel (tie): City of Lies by Sam Hawke

                                             The Witch Who Courted Death by Maria Lewis

            Horror Novel: Tides of Stone by Kaaron Warren

            Children’s Fiction: The Endsister by Penni Russon

            Graphic Novel/Illustrated Work: Tales from The Inner City by Shaun Tan

            Horror Novella: Crisis Apparition by Kaaron Warren

            Horror Short Story: “Sub-Urban” by Alfie Simpson

            Fantasy Novella: “The Staff in the Stone” by Garth Nix

            Fantasy Short Story: “The Further Shore” by J. Ashley Smith

            Science Fiction Novella: Icefall by Stephanie Gunn

            Science Fiction Short Story: “The Astronaut” by Jen White

            Collection: Tales from The Inner City, edited by Shaun Tan

            Anthology: The Best Science Fiction & Fantasy of the Year, edited by Jonathan Strahan

            The Sara Douglass Book Series Award: Blackthorn & Grim Trilogy by Juliet Mariller

            Convenors’ Award for Excellence (tie):

                        Cat Sparks, The 21st Century Catastrophe: Hyper-capitalism and Severe Climate Change in Science Fiction (PhD exegesis Curtin University)

                        Kim Wilkins, Lisa Fletcher and Beth Driscoll, Genre Worlds: Australian Popular Fiction in the 21st Century (http://www.genreworlds.com)

Nommo Award (2018)

Recognizes the works of speculative fiction by Africans, defined as “science fiction, fantasy, stories of magic and traditional belief, alternative histories, horror and strange stuff that might not fit anywhere else,” awarded by the African Speculative Fiction Society

Winners: 

            Novel (The Ilube Award): Freshwater by Akweake Emezi

            Novella: The Fire Bird by Nerine Dorman

            Short Story: “The Witching Hour” by Ekpeki Oghenechovwe Donald

            Comic or Graphic Novel: Shuri by Nnedi Okorafor

SPFBO (Self-Publishing Fantasy Blog-Off) 2018 (4th

Started by Mark Lawrence, yes THAT one, with the purpose to “shines a light on self-published fantasy. It exists to find excellent books that might otherwise have gone unnoticed.” The contest starts with 300 books and it gradually narrows down to 10 finalists! The judges are readers who are bloggers and vloggers. Note: some of these authors gain a following and some even earn a publishing contract, so don’t ignore these books!

Winner: Orconomics by J. Zachary Pike

Finalists:

            The Gods of Men by Barbara Kloss

            The Purification Era Book One: Sowing by Angie Gricaliunas

            We Ride the Storm by Devin Madson

            Symphony of the Wind by Steven McKinnon

            The Anointed by Keith Ward

            Conspiracy of Magic Book One: Ruthless Magic by Megan Crewe

            Sworn to the Night by Craig Schaefer

            Iconoclasts Book 1: Aching God by Mike Shel

            Out of Nowhere by Patrick LeClerc