Review of Season Two of “His Dark Materials”

Season Two of His Dark Materials, based on The Subtle Knife—the second book in His Dark Materials Trilogy by Philip Pullman, has ended. And, I want to thank both the BBC and HBO for thinking ahead and to start production of Season Two as soon as it was announced. It’s because of this decision to move ahead with the production they were able to release this season during the COVID-19 pandemic. Yet, it was announced during San Diego Comic Con 2020 that there was an “interlude” episode they couldn’t film because of the shutdown—it’s supposed to follow Lord Asriel’s travels leading up to his reappearance in the Season Finale—but, they hope to film and to release it ahead of Season Three. Yes, we’re getting the 3rd and final season!

            For those of you who haven’t read the books should know The Subtle Knife is the shortest and the most fast-paced book in the trilogy. The book focuses on introducing Will Parry to readers, introducing Lyra Silvertongue to new worlds—including ours, following up on the aftermath of Lord Asriel creating a bridge to a new world and his plans to end The Authority, Lee Scoresby and the Witches search for Lyra, the Magisterium losing control within their world, and learning about why Lyra’s task is so urgent as well as what Will being The Bearer entails. The TV mini-series takes the time to work on character development and plot development. In addition to everything mentioned, the audience learns more about the characters and the ongoings in all of the worlds and how they are related to each other. 

            The main change and the majority of Season Two focuses on Mrs. Coulter, Lyra’s mother. In the books, readers are aware the mother is searching for her child, and she learns of Lyra’s role in the upcoming Great War. However, readers are ignorant to her actions throughout The Subtle Knife until the very end of the book. In the mini-series, the audience learns of Mrs. Coulter’s motives and her reasons for committing all of the heinous acts she does throughout the season. This doesn’t make Mrs. Coulter a “good” person, but observing her actions and her decisions make her more emphatic; which, is why Lyra tries to avoid her at all costs.  

            While most of the episodes are straight-from-the-books, the time spent expanding on the characters and the world-building is admired. For example, because Will was introduced in Season One, his character was able to develop further into what readers already know he’ll become in by the end-of-the-season. Dr. Mary Malone’s scenes were insightful as well because not only is she able to make the connection between Dust and Dark Matter—while explaining them in a way the audience can understand: physics—but also the audience is able to understand her struggles with separating knowledge and thought before she can make the breakthrough in her research, which sets her on her quest to play the role of “The Serpent.” 

            The screen time with Lyra and Will are what drive the season, but it’s the screen time with Lee Scoresby and Dr. Stanislaus Grumman—a.k.a. Jopari, a.k.a. Colonel John Parry—who enhances it. The former are the adolescent protagonists who are destined to change the worlds using their skills and their tools. The latter are wayward travelers who realize what their destinies are and decide to act on them and protect the “Chosen Ones.” The more time the audience spends time with both pairs, the more they learn about their strengths, their flaws, and their resilience. 

            Overall, I enjoyed Season Two slightly more than I enjoyed Season One. One reason for this is because I spent more time comparing Season One to the movie, The Golden Compass, while distinguishing the mini-series separately. This time around, I was able to enjoy the mini-series without making more comparisons. Another reason is because the readers within the audience witnessed the dedication to the books throughout Season Two. That being said, some of the same issues are there—unnecessary changes which led to plot holes and/or too much character development—but it was a great season to watch. The performances by Dafne Keen, Amir Wilson, Ruth Wilson and Lin-Manuel Miranda have made these beloved characters their own, and I can’t wait to see how the mini-series ends when Season Three—based on The Amber Spyglass—is released, whenever that may be.           

            If you wish to read the reviews for each episode, then you can click on the episode titles to access them.

S2, E1: The City of Magpies

S2, E2: The Cave

S2, E3: The Theft

S2, E4: Tower of Angels

S2, E5: The Scholar

S2, E6: Malice

S2, E7: Æsahættr

My Rating: 9 out of 10

TV Episode Review: “His Dark Materials”: “The City of Magpies”

Season Two immediately picks up where Season One left off. Lyra Silvertongue has crossed the bridge into a new world. A world that is devoid of people, except for one. Will Parry has found himself in the same world, and Lyra is the first person he’s seen since arriving there. However, both children soon learn that the other isn’t from that world, and they’re not alone. 

            Meanwhile, the witches have joined forces in order to search for Lyra and to protect her as the prophecies continue to play out. They find an ally in Lee Scoresby, who goes in search of another who is said to possess a weapon that offers protection. At the same time, the Magisterium and Mrs. Coulter find themselves preparing for war as they attempt to track down both Lord Asriel and Lyra. 

            The premiere episode of Season Two feels more like a filler than an episode, but it makes sense because there’s supposed to be a “fallout” due to Lord Asriel’s actions. He knew what he was doing and what would happen because of it, but he did it because he believes in his cause. The episode is split between the Magisterium, and Lyra and Will. The Magisterium fears losing power due to the “evidence” that they have no control over their world (and others), and Will and Lyra are searching for a haven. Lyra and Will’s interactions are almost parallel to the events in the beginning of The Subtle Knife—especially the cooking scene. 

            In all, The City of Magpies is a decent premiere of what is to come throughout Season Two. Not all worlds are the same or safe, and tensions continue to build up. Fans will enjoy the new introduction sequence. In addition, there is another cameo appearance by a young actress from another popular media adaptation series which will leave you all even more engaged in the scenes compared to other ones.

My Rating: 8 out of 10

Review of Season One of “His Dark Materials”

Season one of His Dark Materials, based on The Northern Lights/The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman has completed its run on the BBC and on HBO, and they didn’t alter the ending! Overall, season one was a great adaptation to the books and some of the “fillers” worked well for the narrative that was presented to the audience. Readers got to enjoy scenes that were denied to them from the 2007 movie and viewers were able to grasp the demeanor of all of the characters thanks to both the actors’ portrayals of the characters and the “fillers” which were added for additional context. 

            It should be mentioned that the TV mini-series was a better adaptation than the movie, but this is due to the fact that neither the studios, nor the test audience (these are based on rumors, which have circulated over and over again) interfered with the editing of the series. The order of the events presented matched the way they occurred in the books, the “true” ending of season one ended the way it does in the books, and the revelations of what was happening to the missing children weren’t glossed over. Yes, the movie did get a lot of things right, and those were repeated in the series, but the TV series is more in tandem with the books.

            The issues I have with the series so far should be mentioned as well. First, is the aging up of some of the younger characters. Lyra, Roger, and Billy were all close to the age of the characters they portrayed (between 10 and 12 years-old), but Will Parry was aged up to 15 years-old (he’s around 12-13 years-old when readers first meet him). I want to say this was because of the age of the actor who is portraying Will, but it’s difficult to determine whether or not this is the case. Yes, there have been some cases in which the age of the character(s) have been altered due to the actors that play them, but there have been even more examples of when it’s happened because the studio(s) believe it’ll make the narrative “more believable.” If it’s the former, then I have no complaint; but if it’s the latter, then they should stop making it so obvious. 

            Next, were the ways the proximity of daemons were presented to the viewers. While in the books, it is unclear what the actual distance a human can be “away” from their daemon, it is clear that the proximity has to be very close in order for human and daemon to maintain their bond and their lives. However, there are moments when the proximity is unclear and that is due to the way some of daemons are presented. Sometimes they are far enough for the individual not to experience pain, and then they are so far away that you wonder whether or not they could be similar to a witch’s daemon. I hope the network and the studio corrects this misconception for season two because it became very confusing between each episode. 

            Last, was the way Dust is presented throughout the season. The mystery of Dust was portrayed better than the knowledge of it. The explanation provided in the season finale is straight from the books, but the “danger” of someone outside of Jordan College and the Magisterium having knowledge of what Dust is—which, was presented better in the movie—wasn’t demonstrated in the series the way it should have been, in my opinion. Then again, Dust is supposed to be remain a mystery throughout the series until the end. 

            Besides the casting and the special effects, there were several things that I enjoyed about season one from the titles of the episodes—based on chapters in the books—to the way the parental figures were portrayed in the series. Presenting both Mrs. Coulter and Mrs. Parry as “damaged” individuals who try to balance their demeanor with their desire to be mothers to their children was presented extremely well. The issue of succession and power amongst the panserbjørne and the Magisterium—which, are both essential to the plot of the story—were presented (with the details given throughout the books) with the hypocrisy immensely. And, the motives of Lord Asriel and his reasons for doing everything he does comes back full circle. Lord Asriel is what keeps the narrative moving along and the series makes sure that the viewers do not forget it. Yet, it was Ruth Wilson’s portrayal of Mrs. Coulter that grasped the viewers’ attention the most. 

            Overall, season one of His Dark Materials was the adaptation fans of the books waited for patiently, and the wait was worth it. All of the details that were omitted from the 2007 movie were included, the pacing matched the books and were appropriate for a TV mini-series, and the inclusion of source material from other books in the Philip Pullman’s universe—both The Book of Dust and The Subtle Knife—enriched the narrative more than expected and it worked well for the audience, both readers and viewers. Season two was announced by the BBC (with HBO promising to continue showing the series in the U.S.), which is great because this news is what book fans have been waiting for the most! The adaptation of The Subtle Knife will not only continue Lyra’s story, but also continue the narrative from the multiple cliffhangers this time around. Yes, the books should be read, but knowing that the mini-series will continue makes book fans as excited as the viewers more than anyone else can imagine! 

If you want the reviews of each episode, then you can click on each of the episode titles below:

S1, Ep.1: Lyra’s Jordan

S1, Ep. 2: The Idea of North

S1, Ep. 3: The Spies

S1, Ep. 4: Armour

S1, Ep. 5: The Lost Boy

S1, Ep. 6: The Daemon-Cages

S1, Ep. 7: The Fight to the Death

S1, Ep. 8: Betrayal

My Rating: 8.5 out of 10! 

TV Episode Review: “His Dark Materials: Betrayal”

The season finale of Season One begins with both Mrs. Coulter and Lord Asriel—Lyra’s parents—preparing for what they’ve been planning for since the first episode. The former is planning to kill Lord Asriel under the orders of the Magisterium, and the latter is planning something that involves the aurora—a.k.a. the northern lights—and this involves his strange interest in Roger. 

            Lyra’s reunion and confrontation with her father does not go the way she wants it to go. Lord Asriel admits that he is Lyra’s father, but he’s not going to be the sort of father she wants him to be. Meanwhile, Mrs. Coulter admits that her abandoning Lyra was a mistake and she’s been trying to rectify it. Lyra goes from being an orphan to knowing she’s an abandoned child, and she doesn’t know how to deal with either the knowledge or the rejection of it. It is Roger who comforts her when she doesn’t know how to deal with her feelings. Roger tells Lyra that they can “pretend to be orphans” again, knowing life for them has changed and things won’t ever be the same. 

            Lord Asriel makes the decision to explain to Lyra the purpose of his research and his reason for him being absent. The discussion of Dust and its origins comes from the novel. The Magisterium believes that Dust is Original Sin and that it begins to affect humans once they start puberty. Lyra begins to understand why the Magisterium conducted the experiments on the missing children, and Lord Asriel explains his beliefs on Dust and his discovery about the aurora and Dust—it can build a bridge between worlds. He asks Lyra if she wants to go with him, but Lyra has already decided to return to Jordan College with Roger. 

            Meanwhile, Lord Carlo Boreal continues his search for the Parrys and the letters. Will is hiding in town knowing that the police are looking for him because of the man he killed. What Will doesn’t know is that the reason he’s being tracked is because Lord Carlo Boreal is using the police to find him. It’s interesting how far the power of the Magisterium stretches across the worlds. Will manages to stay hidden, but he knows that it’s only a matter of time before he’s found, and he needs to hide somewhere where no one can find him. 

            Lyra wakes up when the Magisterium has arrived to arrest her father, but her father has already left taking Roger with him to the peak of the mountain. Lyra realizes that her father didn’t need the alethiometer, but Roger. Lord Asriel needed a child whose daemon hasn’t settled yet in order to use the energy from the bond to create a bridge. Similar to how Mrs. Coulter wouldn’t sacrifice Lyra to the intercision, Lord Asriel refused to sacrifice Lyra. This could be viewed as a twisted type of love parents have for their child.  

            Lyra rushes to save Roger. She dodges the Magisterium’s attacks thanks to Iorek Byrinison and the other panserbjørnes; however, not even Iorek can travel across the thin bands of ice. Lyra Silvertongue says goodbye to Iorek not knowing what will happen once she reaches the top. Pantalaimon tells Lyra that Roger is in a cage similar to the one at The Station and Lyra knows what her father plans to do. Unfortunately, she’s too late. Lord Asriel creates the bridge at the cost of the life of his daughter’s best friend. 

            Mrs. Coulter arrives too late as well, but she resists her orders to kill her former lover. Lord Asriel tells her of his plans to end the Magisterium and asks her to join him. It’s a brief, yet strange, reconciliation between Lyra’s parents (in which, Lyra witnesses firsthand in the book). However, Mrs. Coulter rejects Lord Asriel in order to stay with Lyra. Lyra regains consciousness in time to avoid her mother and she goes to say goodbye to Roger. Lyra decides that she needs to find Dust before her father and the Magisterium. At the same time, Will goes to the park, the same one where Lord Carlo Boreal travels from, where he finds a cat that disappears into thin air. Lyra and Will go through the bridges at the same time not knowing where they’ll end up. 

            Betrayal is an appropriate season finale because it wraps up all of the plots throughout the season going back to the events of the first episode. All of the questions asked from that first episode are answered. The deviation from the books works for this episode as well because it fits with the adaptation presented to us by the BBC and HBO. The only question left is “what happens next?” There will be a season two, which will be based on The Subtle Knife. Hopefully, the next season will continue to follow the darker tones left by season one.

My Rating: 9.0 out of 10.