Why You Need to Read: “Chaos Vector”

The Protectorate: Book 2: Chaos Vector                               

By: Megan E. O’Keefe                                                           Audiobook: 19 hours and 5 minutes

Published: July 28, 2020                                                      Narrated by: Joe Jameson

Genre: Science Fiction/Space Opera

            “It’s been two years. Why would things escalate now?

            Graham smiled slyly. “Because you’re back, kid. Two years and some change was about the time you disappeared, about the time Icarion lost control of Bero. Nakata, Kenwick, Lavaux—they’re all tangled up somehow, and Harlan and his crew crossed paths with that lot,” (Chapter 6: Can’t Count on a Spy). 

            Cliffhangers have always been an interesting concept in storytelling. I’ve mentioned in previous posts that cliffhangers are excellent ways to keep the audience engaged in the narrative. There are several cliffhangers the storyteller can use, but depending on the narrative, one fits better than others. In the case of Megan E. O’Keefe and her The Protectorate trilogy, Chaos Vector—the sequel to Velocity Weapon—picks up immediately after the revelations in the first book. And, that includes both the plot and the pace.

            There are 4 protagonists in this book. First, is Sanda Greeve, who went from “Hero of Ada Prime” to suspected murdered of a Keeper. Now, she’s on the run to clear her name after a brief reunion with her family and to discover what is in the Keeper Chip that is embedded in her skull. After learning some about one of her fathers’ past, Sanda joins up with Arden, Nox and everyone else in Harlan’s crew in order to solve 2 mysteries with 1 person of interest, Rainier Lavaux. Second, is Biran Greeve, Sanda’s younger brother and one of the Keepers. Life as a Keeper begins to catch up with Biran as he does damage control, first for his sister and then for the Keepers; and, he begins his investigation into the missing Keeper, the stolen Keeper Chip, and The Light of Berossus, all while trying to figure out who among the other Keepers are his allies. Third, is Jules, whose circumstances and previous actions now have her working for Rainier Lavaux. She hides herself from her friends as she does everything she can to save one of them, but is she being played? Last, is Tomas Cepko, the agent from Nazca whom Biran hired previously. Now that his mission is complete, Tomas is given a new assignment; and, it’s Rainier Lavaux. All of the protagonists and the other characters are beginning to comprehend the effect their recent actions have on one another, for the rest of Ada Prime, and the Icarions. Not to mention, what happened to Bero? 

            The first plot in this novel carries over from the first book, only now there are more questions than answers. But, everything revolves around Rainier Lavaux, the wife of the murdered Keeper. Somehow, she knows about both The Light of Berossus and the Keeper Chip; but, which one will she go after? And, why is she so interested in Jules? The second plot revolves around the Keeper Chip lounged in Sanda’s skull. Sanda is on a mission to discover the contents on the Chip before Ada Prime’s enemies track her down and reclaim it. Meanwhile, Biran looks into which Keeper went missing and why that Keeper’s Chip stands out more than the other ones. There are 2 subplots, which develop alongside the 2 plots which enhances and expands the narrative. The first one focuses on Jules’ efforts to thwart Rainier Lavaux’s plans, which pulls Jules further into an intergalactic conspiracy that she never would have imagined getting involved in. The second subplot delves into the events of the past which may or may not have impacted the present. As everything converges, it begins to make sense. 

            The narrative is more straightforward than in the first book. There are 2 years that the narrative focuses on: Prime Standard Year 0002 (the past) and Prime Standard Year 3543 (the present). All of the narratives are told in the 3rd person limited in the present tense from the points-of-view of the protagonists. Unlike the previous book, the sequence of events allow the narrative to be followed easily by readers (and by listeners). The streams-of-consciousness of the protagonists not only give the audience a complete understanding of the revelations, but also make the characters reliable narrators.

            The style Megan E. O’Keefe uses in Chaos Vector flows from Velocity Weapon. There is a political conspiracy that is starting to unravel, but the majority of the citizens seem focused on the continued conflict between 2 feuding nations. This conflict reflects the mood of this novel which is distraction. The leaders of Ada Prime do not want their citizens to worry about “threats,” so they make announcements about falsehoods to keep everyone “calm” as they continue to work on a cover-up instead of addressing the conflict. This leads to the tone of this book which centers around the idea of duty. Some of the characters are more willing to follow up on their obligations than others including their superiors. It remains to be seen whether or not the characters’ choices will have negative consequences for the rest of the galaxy.

            The appeal for Chaos Vector have been positive. Fans of Velocity Weapon will be pleased to know that the author presents a strong and fast-paced sequel to this familial space opera. Science fiction fans and anyone who is interested in an intriguing space opera should read this series, especially with the third and final book in the trilogy—Catalyst Gate—releasing this summer (2021)! If you cannot read the book, then you can listen to the audiobook like I did. Once again, Joe Jameson does an excellent job narrating this story, and I hope he does the next book!

            Chaos Vector is a strong and an entertaining sequel to this underappreciated space opera. Both the characters and the plot develop as answers lead to more questions. Everything Megan E. O’Keefe has written in her story guarantees a promising conclusion to this trilogy! Don’t wait any longer, start reading The Protectorate

My Reading: Enjoy It (4.5 out of 5). 

Why You Need to Read: “Shards of Earth”

The Final Architects Trilogy, #1: Shards of Earth

By: Adrian Tchaikovsky

Published: May 27, 2021 (U.K.)/August 3, 2021 (U.S.)

Genre: Science Fiction

            The Architects had discovered that humans existed. The war, that had raged for eighty years and cost billions of lives, had been fought without the knowledge of one of its parties. And on becoming aware of humanity, the Architects had simply vanished. Nobody knew where they went. Nobody knew where they had come from or why they’d done what they did. They had never been seen again, (Part 1: Roshu, 3: Solace). 

            There is always that one author whose books you try to make time to read because you’ve heard nothing but excellent things about their books. However, for some reason, you buy, and you start reading one of their books, and for some reason, you don’t get to finish it. So, what do you do? Well, in my case, you get asked to participate in a book tour for the author’s upcoming novel, Shards of Earth, the first book in The Final Architects Trilogy. Finally, I could delve into this author’s creative mind. 

            The main characters in this novel are the crew of the ship, Vulture God, scavengers who travel throughout the galaxy and perform jobs for payment. The captain of the Vulture God is Rollo Rostand, but one of the protagonists is the ship’s navigator, Idris Telemmier, who is an Intermediary, a genetically modified individual who was used as a weapon to fight against the Architects 40 years ago. Idris still suffers from PTSD and keeps both his past and his abilities to himself. That is until Myrmidon Executor Solace, a Partheni soldier and agent, tracks Idris down with a “proposition” for him. Idris knows he can’t evade Solace forever, but before he can confront her, the Vulture God accepts a job no one else wants. The good news is the Vulture God completes the job. The bad news is the crew stumbled upon something HUGE, which forces them to become fugitives. Another protagonist is Havear Mundy, an Intervention Board agent, who has been tasked with tracking down the crew of the Vulture God to learn of their “activities.” The rest of the crew—Kris (another protagonist), Olli, Barney and Medvig—develop alongside Idris, Solace and Havaer. While they are all different races and have separate histories, they are terrified of the Architects.  

            The plot of this story focuses on the long-term aftermath of an alien invasion of a different sort. The Architects invaded the galaxy, but instead of simply dominating humans and the other races, they destroyed planets in a way which leaves the survivors shaken. After several decades, the Architects left and the societal galaxy has changed, but there have been signs that the Architects have returned. The question is: should the news go public? Not to mention, who is left that knows how to fight them off? There is one subplot that deserves the most attention and that is the various factions—both political and religious—who are fighting for dominance and have their own views about the Architects and the rumors of their “return.” Between the cults and the stereotypes all of the races have about each other, you are left wondering how they all would survive a 2nd invasion. This subplot develops alongside the plot at an appropriate rate. This is because the world is fleshed out as the story develops.

            The narrative is told from the points-of-view of Idris, Solace, the other crew members of the Vulture God, and Havear in the 3rd person limited. This means the reader knows what is happening to the characters from one of their perspectives. While there are moments where the characters present their memories and their past experiences, the narrative is presented through their streams-of-consciousness in the present; and, their experiences and knowledge of their race and their history make them reliable narrators. Yes, the narrative is heavy at times, but it can be followed by the reader(s). 

            The style Adrian Tchaikovsky uses for Shards of Earth is part hard science fiction and part space opera. Readers can tell this story is a space opera—the mention of spaceships, galaxies, space battles, etc.—from the Prologue. The hard science fiction becomes noticeable when readers learn about the genetics of each race and the ecosystems of each planet. Yes, it is A LOT of information and scientific terminology, but the world-building that comes from it presents a believable galaxy (could it be our future?). Plus, there is a Glossary which readers can consult while they read the book. In addition, the author’s take on the factions as part of the war’s aftermath is believable. Think about it, during the last 20 years of global events—including the COVID-19 Pandemic—how much has religion and politics changed? In fact, it’s creepy how accurate the cult following of the author’s factions reflect the ones in our present day. The mood in this novel is an ominous one because the signs of the threat are there, and the individuals must decide on what they are going to do about it. The tone in this novel focuses on the self-imposed options of all of the characters within the story. Many of the characters in this story come from races and/or planets where certain “orders” are expected to be followed by those in charge. However, when “bigger” things are at stake, shouldn’t there be a choice for everyone regardless of societal expectations? In fact, why is free will such a difficult concept for some of these factions and races? 

            So far, the appeal for Shards of Earth have been positive. I say this because this book have been released in the U.K. with an upcoming release in the U.S. later this summer. As I mentioned earlier, I am participating in a book tour, so I received an eARC of this book. I can tell you that the hype surrounding this book is real, and fans of Adrian Tchaikovsky’s previous books will appreciate this one. And, as a fan of both Megan E. O’Keefe and Martha Wells, I highly recommend this book. Yes, this is the 1st book in a trilogy, and with the way this book ended, you’re going to be anxious to read Book 2 when it comes out. While there were moments where familiar sci-fi tropes appeared, the story was worth the read.

            Shards of Earth is an informative and an exceptional story about alien invasions, feuding factions, and eugenics. I’m glad this book tour gave me the opportunity to read this book in advanced, which allowed me to complete a book by Adrian Tchaikovsky! So, which of his books should I read next as I wait for the next book in this series?   

My Rating: Enjoy It (4 out of 5). 

Reading Check-In: May 29, 2021

My schedule is starting to clear up, so here’s another update to what I’m reading.

What are you currently reading?

I should be halfway through this eARC by the end of this holiday weekend.

What will you read next?

I’m very anxious to start this eARC.

I will be reading this while listening to the audiobook.

As I mentioned earlier, I have more time to start reading again, and I have A LOT of catching up to do! Next weekend, I’ll be posting reviews again.

What you reading right now?

Most Anticipated Reads of 2021: Summer Edition

My workload is starting to lighten a bit and that means I can get back to reading, and I have A LOT of catching up to do! Here are some of the many books I will be reading throughout Summer 2021! Is it safe to call this my Summer Reading?!

I’m still reading my way through…

Next book on my list is…

I might have to read this book while listening to the audiobook edition.

Finally, I can start reading this book!

My excitement for this book hasn’t waned.

I just won a print edition of this book from FanFiAddict! Thank you!

It feels like I’m the last blogger to read this book.

I haven’t forgotten about this book!

Thank you to J.C. Kang for sending me a copy of this book.

I need to know what happens next in this series!

I’m not going to include ALL of the books I’ll be reading this summer in this post because it would be never-ending! That being said, I will be reading these 10 books throughout the summer. And yes, I will be writing and posting reviews for ALL of them, so be ready to read them!

Which books will you be reading throughout the summer?

Reading Check-In: May 1, 2021

I’ve managed to get some reading done this week.

What did you finish reading?

I LOVE MURDERBOT! Another excellent novella about our favorite snarky robot! I’m aiming to reading Network Effect this summer, finally!

What are you currently reading?

I’m still listening to Chaos Vector, and I hope to finish it within the next 1-2 weeks.

I’m back to reading Shards of Earth. The good news is because I haven’t made too much progress, which means I still remember everything that I’ve read so far.

What will you read next?

FYI: The title for Book 5, which is the last book in this series, has been released. It’s available on a certain website!

I am WAY behind on my reading (for reasons I’ll get into when the time is right). These are 3 of several books I hope to start reading by the end of the month.

Reading Check-In: April 24, 2021

Hello everyone! This week’s post is another update on what I’m reading.

What did you finish reading?

I finished this book some about 2 weeks ago, but I haven’t written my review of it yet. For those of you who’ve read Middlegame, you will recognize the title of the series (The Up-and-Under) and the author’s name, A. Deborah Baker (a.k.a. Seanan McGuire’s pseudonym). This story follows two young children from opposite sides of the same community who come across a wall, climb over it, meet each other in a new world, and make their way through it while meeting everyone who resides there. The next book, Along the Saltwise Sea, comes out later this fall. Even if I don’t get a galley of this book, then I plan on preordering it.

What are you currently reading?

I was hoping to finish this book sooner so I would have my review ready BEFORE next week’s release. Tor.com was kind enough to approve my request for this galley, and I thought I had to read Network Effect before reading this novella. After a few of my fellow bookbloggers clued me in that this story takes places before the novel, I started it immediately. I LOVE MURDERBOT, and I’m aiming to finish this story and to have the review written and posted very soon!

Currently, I’m still listening to the audiobook (while re-reading the chapters in my galley), and I’m 75% done with this book. I believe I know what could happen by the end of this book. However, the cover reveal for Book 3 has me wanting to finish this book A.S.A.P.!

What will you read next?

Without getting into too much detail, I received an eARC of this book early. I’ve been meaning to read the books this author has written for a long time. In fact, I’ve read the 1st half of The Tiger and the Wolf, and I haven’t finished it yet (READ IT). I started this book, and so far it’s a space opera experience I won’t forget anytime soon. I’m looking forward to reading this book through. And yes, my review for this book will be SPOILER FREE.

This week’s Book Haul!

Do I have to explain how excited I am for this book?! The Broken God is supposed to take place right after the events at the end of The Shadow Saint. All I know about this book is that Cari returns as one of the main P.O.V. characters. And, the author announced recently that the series has been expanded to 5 books! Yes, I’m excited about that, and I’m curious as to what will happen between the end of this book and the end of the series.

TBRcon21: Another Success for Virtual Cons

It’s 2021, the pandemic is ongoing, and it still sucks. Fortunately, we’ve gotten better at entertaining ourselves through our hobbies and interests. Readers and bookbloggers have been able to make the most of lockdown by reading (or, trying to read) our TBR piles and helping authors and publishers with promoting any books we get our hands on! Technology continues to be a lifesaver as we all continue to find ways to keep up with news surrounding our favorite authors and any upcoming book releases.

            David Walters—a.k.a. FanFiAddict—impressed everyone last spring with last year’s “MayDayCon2020” where he hosted 7 panels and 7 live readings in 14 hours! This time around, FanFiAddict reached out to a few of his fellow bookbloggers—Beth Tabler, Travis Tippens (from The Fantasy Inn), and Jason, a.k.a. Traveling Cloak—to assist with “TBRcon2021.” This virtual Con had 17 panels across 6 days, with several of our favorite speculative fiction authors participating in the panels discussing numerous topics within the genre, and about writing in general. In fact, I’m going to say that it was because of the “Writerly Advice—NOT” panel that led to #writingadvice trending on Twitter (with some “interesting” responses).

            Without listing all of the authors, this virtual con had authors ranging from debut to indie to “established” ones across the speculative fiction genre—epic fantasy, grimdark, space operas, historical fantasy, etc.—and, all of the S.P.F.B.O. finalists were there too, with the Con ending with a round of Dungeons & Dragons. So, what made this virtual Con so memorable? First, as I mentioned before, was the authors. Just about all of the subgenres and genres were represented by the participants—whom were from diverse backgrounds and from around the world (i.e. Australia)! Next, were the topics discussed on each panel. Topics from world-building to history to the future of the genre were talked about, and it was interesting to hear what each author had to say about them. Last, was the schedule. While it was impressive how David managed to host the first Con in a day by himself, how he managed to get even more authors to participate in 1 or more panels for a 6-day event is beyond laudable. Yes, this virtual Con was free, and could be viewed on YouTube, Twitch and Facebook, but I would argue that this is further proof that these virtual Cons are worthy fillers for all author events while the pandemic continues (yes, I want it to end, too).

            “TBRcon21” had something for everyone, and you can rewatch these panels online. Another reason I’m discussing virtual Cons again is because of what I believe fans are getting out of them. Although several Cons have moved to virtual, not all of them are accessible for everyone. Everyone who is interested has to register for tickets, and there are times when they sell out. It is too early to tell what will happen to virtual Cons whenever “normalcy” returns, but I don’t believe they will go away. This Con is proof authors are interested in interacting with fans and readers, and those fans and readers will find ways to attend these events. I hope agents, marketers and publishers are paying attention because it looks like bookbloggers have found a way to bridge themselves between the publishing industry and the readers who Google whether or not they should read a particular book. And before you ask, I’m not excluding BookTubers. In fact, if these virtual Cons were to become more ubiquitous, then I believe some BookTubers could give us a hand with certain panels. While we’re on the subject, I know some podcasters who would be interested in participating as well. 

            “TBRcon21” is another accomplishment by FanFiAddict, and it is proof the publishing industry is paying attention to us, and authors are willing to communicate with their fans and vice versa, and will find ways to keep at it no matter what it takes. So, what shall we do as we all decompress from this event? Well, Virginia McClain will be hosting “QuaranCon2021” this spring, and I’m looking forward to it. I hope to see more participants (and authors) at that event this year! I hope to see you all there participating in the live chats!

The Midpoint of 2020: Favorite Speculative Fiction Books…So Far

Well, we made it to the halfway point of the year 2020, which will go down as one of the most pivotal (and the wackiest) years in living memory. Just like everyone else, I’ve been affected by both the COVID-19 pandemic and the murders which led to the international Black Lives Matter movement, as well as a few things in my personal life. I managed to adapt and I’m starting to catch up on everything that’s been going on. I am managing to keep up with all of my reading while expanding on my blog and my other projects. So, while my WIP remain in that state, I’m glad to say that I’ve been branching out and checking out new YouTubers and following fellow bookbloggers; and, I want to thank those who have asked me to be guests on their channels and on their blogs. Last, I want to thank everyone for reading my posts that are not reviews, but are personal essays and deep dives into literature, pop culture, and current events. It feels good to know that there are people who are interested in what I post online.

            As for reading in 2020, I’m reading, but I’m reading more than speculative fiction. You can look at my Goodreads page and you’ll see what I mean. In terms of speculative fiction, I’ve been catching up on some of what I missed, and I’m getting back into paranormal and urban fantasy. I have a stack of graphic novels that I need to read, too; but, I’ll get to them eventually. How many of 2020’s Most Anticipated releases have you read so far?

            So, what does that mean for my favorite speculative fiction books of 2020, so far? Well, I haven’t finished reading 10 books that were released this year, yet; but, I can talk about at least 10 speculative fiction books in 2020 that I’m enjoying, and ones I’m excited to read. In other words, this list will be different from last year’s, but I hope you find this list of reads as interesting, informative, and/or enjoyable.

Books I’ve Finished:

The Nine Realms: A Queen in Hiding; The Queen of Raiders; A Broken Queen; The Cerulean Queen

     by Sarah Kozloff

Wayward Children, #5: Come Tumbling Down by Seanan McGuire

Riot Baby by Tochi Onyebuchi

Daughter from the Dark by Marina and Sergey Dyachenko, translated by Julia Meitov Hersey

The Black Iron Legacy, #2: The Shadow Saint by Gareth Hanrahan

The Legacy of the Mercenary Kings, #1: The Kingdom of Liars by Nick Martell

The Order of the Pure Moon Reflected in Water by Zen Cho

Books I’m Currently Reading:

The Daevabad Trilogy, #3: The Empire of Gold by S.A. Chakraborty

The Kingston Cycle, #2: Stormsong by C.L. Polk

Malus Domestica Trilogy, #1: Burn the Dark by S.A. Hunt

The Protectorate, #2: Chaos Vector by Megan E. O’Keefe

A Chorus of Dragons, #3: The Memory of Souls by Jenn Lyons

The Reborn Empire, #1: We Ride the Storm by Devin Madson

Books I Want to Read by the End of 2020:

The City, #1: The City We Became by N.K. Jemisin

The Murderbot Diaries, #5: The Network Effect by Martha Wells

The Poppy War, #3: The Burning God by R.F. Kuang

Anasazi Series, #1: Between Earth and Sky by Rebecca Roanhorse

The Invisible Life of Addie La Rue by V.E. Schwab

Burningblade & Silvereye, #1: Ashes of the Sun by Django Wexler

The Only Good Indians by Stephen Graham Jones

Race the Sands: A Novel by Sarah Beth Durst

Docile by K.M. Szpara

Chronicles of the Bitch Queen, #1: The Wolf of Oren-Yaro by K.S. Villoso

The Locked Tomb, #2: Harrow the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir

Rook and Ruin, #1: The Obsidian Tower by Melissa Caruso

Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

City of Sacrifice, #2: Ash and Bones by Michael R. Fletcher

The Drowning Empire, #1: The Bone Shard Daughter by Andrea Stewart

Stealing Thunder by Alina Boyden

The Burning, #2: The Fires of Vengeance by Evan Winter

The Once and Future Witches by Alix E. Harrow

Scholomance, #1: A Deadly Education by Naomi Novik

Master of Poisons by Andrea Hairston 

Malus Domestica Trilogy: I Come with Knives and The Hellion by S.A. Hunt 

The Year of the Witching by Alexis Henderson

The Hanged God Trilogy, #1: Northern Wrath by Thilde Kold Holdt

AND, A LOT MORE!!!

            I hope to read 100 books by the end of the year, with at least 30 of them being speculative fiction books that were released this year. Which books will be on my Top 20 (or 25) Favorite Speculative Fiction Books of 2020? We’ll have to wait and see. 

Why You Need to Read: “Velocity Weapon”

The Protectorate: Book 1: Velocity Weapon                          

By: Megan E. O’Keefe                                        Audiobook: 18 hours 22 minutes

Published: June 11, 2019                                  Narrated by: Joe Jameson

Genre: Science Fiction/Space Opera

I am called “The Light of Berossus,” the voice said, (Chapter 1, The Aftermath of the Battle of Dralee). 

For every individual in a fandom, there is the moment, in which they were hooked, thus beginning their membership. For me and science fiction, it was my parents’ love for the two Star Trek shows which aired during the 1990s: The Next Generation and Deep Space Nine—yes, Star Wars was part of my introduction to the genre, too. From there, I started reading science fiction novels, until I stopped. Don’t get me wrong, I was still a fan of the genre, but I didn’t read as many books as I wanted to (there were plenty of movies, TV shows and video games, but that’s for another time). Sometime later I got back into the science fiction by reading the recent releases by different authors which had my exploring the genre again. Yet, it was Velocity Weapon by Megan E. O’Keefe which kept my interest to the point where I bought the audiobook so that I could know what happened after my “stop point” in reading the print book. This space opera reintroduced me to the science fiction genre and reminded me why I fell in love with it in the first place!

There are 3 protagonists in this novel, who narrate the events over the course of several years from 3 different settings. First, there is Sanda Greeve. She is a sergeant for the Ada Prime System, and the last thing she remembers is being shot by the Icarions before her evac pod allowed her to escape, onto an enemy ship—an A.I. Smartship. When she wakes up she learns is the only living being on the ship—The Light of Berossus, or Bero—and, when she asks how and why this is possible, she learns that it’s been 230 years since her ship was shot down. Sanda processes this shocking bit of news as she figures out a way to survive in space with a smartship for company. Next, there is Biran Greeve, Sanda’s younger brother, who has just graduated from the academy at the top of his class. This means that Biran will become a Keeper—a member of the Protectorate who leads Ada Prime and is one of the “keepers” of secrets and knowledge of the Star Systems, which are embedded in a chip that gets implanted inside their skull. However, as Biran is giving his speech, the Battle of Dralee—the same battle his older sister ends up fighting in—breaks out. Biran must behave as a Keeper before his indoctrination and before he can wonder whether or not his sister survived the battle. Last, there is Jules, a thief. During the latest heist with her crew, Jules and the others stumble upon two things: a dead body and a room filled with test tubes. There are other characters who interact with these protagonists throughout the story: Lolla and Harlan, Tomas Cepko, Anaia, and Callie Mera; and, they all help the protagonists develop into the people they need to be given their circumstances. Then, there is Bero, who is more than a smartship. It is aware of what’s going on more than its letting on to everyone else. 

The plot of this novel is an interesting one. The Battle of Dralee in the Prime Standard Year 3541 starts the story and the plot emerges from there, from the Greeve siblings. Biran must step up into his role as Keeper, while he breaks protocol in order to search for his missing sister. Sanda is drifting towards another Star System injured and alone on a damaged smartship. She must rely on her training and instincts, and on Bero to survive her situation. There are two subplots, which are related to the plot. The first one is the secret, in which Jules and her crew stumble across and what it could mean for them, for Icarion and for Ada Prime. The second one focuses on Bero and his motivations. Why is an enemy smartship drifting in the middle of Space? And, why did he rescue Sergeant Sanda Greeve? The plot and the subplots develop alongside the characters and the world-building at an appropriate rate, which make it impossible for the readers to lose track of everything that is going on in the story. 

The narrative jumps across 3 different years from 3 different locations from the points-of-view of several characters. All of the narratives are told in first person from the protagonists and the other characters perspectives. Readers must pay attention to the sequence of the narrative because while the narrative is the present for one character, it may be occurring in the past or the future for another character. The sequence of the narrative starts off with puzzlement for both the readers and the characters, but the events within the sequence keep the narrative in one constant motion where it can be followed by the readers and the audience. The characters’ streams-of-consciousness allow readers to know the thoughts of the characters and the reasons they make the decisions and perform the actions they do. There are moments of flashbacks within the narrative, and they provide clues of the bigger story that is being told. 

The style Megan E. O’Keefe uses in Velocity Weapon consists of the jargon of science fiction, the colloquialism of the armed forces, and the terminology for the world of space she cultivated for this series. The idea that two-star systems have been at war with each other for hundreds, or thousands, of years, with Earth as the potential beacon for the establishments for these star systems is an interesting factor to consider for the sort of story the author is presenting to her readers. The author is not presenting a science fiction story about two warring nations, she is writing a space opera—”a space story involving conflict between opponents possessing powerful technologies and abilities on a very large scale”—and about the consequences of hidden technology, which is the tone of this novel. The mood is hostility, including what it entails and how it is dealt with. While it is not that different from other space operas, it’s the way the author writes it that makes it very engaging.

The appeal for Velocity Weapon has been positive for sci-fi fans—which is good—but, minimal for the rest of the speculative fiction community. And, what I mean by that is that it is a great story that seems to be limited to one part of the literary fandom. There is enough of the same themes and ideas found in other works of science fiction and in fantasy fiction, yet it seems that more people would read this book and others like it if given the chance to learn about this story. There is a reason why this book was one of My Selections for Best Speculative Fiction Books of 2019. When I wasn’t able to continue reading this story, I finished it by listening to the audiobook. Joe Jameson’s performance of the characters make them easy for listeners to make out which character is speaking and narrating the story; and, his narration and voice is appropriate for the story that is being read by the listeners. The next book in The Protectorate series, Chaos Vector, will be released in July 2020. Fans of the first book are waiting eagerly to learn what happens next.

Velocity Weapon is an entertaining space opera about family, government conspiracies, A.I. ships, and an ongoing military campaign between nations that will keep readers’ interests from beginning to end. Megan E. O’Keefe demonstrates her abilities for writing engaging stories across the spectrum of speculative fiction. Sci-fi fans should consider adding it to theirs. This book is a reminder that space is a fascinating frontier!

My Rating: Enjoy It (4.5 out of 5).