Why You Need to Read: “Gideon the Ninth”

The Locked Tomb #1: Gideon the Ninth

By: Tasmyn Muir                                                                   Audiobook: 16 hours 50 minutes

Published: September 10, 2019                                              Narrated by: Moira Quirk

Genre: Dark Fantasy/Gothic

            When as a young and disinclined member of the Locked Tomb Gideon had painted her face, she had gone for the bare minimum of death’s-head that the role demanded: dark around the eyes, a bit around the nose, a slack black slash across the lips. Now as Harrowhark gave her a little palm of cracked mirror, she saw that she was painted like the ancient, tottering necromancers of the House: those ghastly and unsettling sages who never seemed to die, just disappear into the long galleries of books and coffins beneath Drearburh. She’d been slapped up to look like a grim-toothed, black-socketed skull, with big black holes on each side of the mandible.

            Gideon said drearily, “I look like a douche,” (5). 

            Hype and marketing for a book is an interesting feat some people find themselves in. Publishers and bookstores—usually through marketers—are paid to advertise such books for sale. Librarians read these books in order to determine whether or not the book(s) are “appropriate for their library and/or community.” And, reviewers—including book critics and bookbloggers—read these books and give an opinion on why each book should or should not be read. There are moments when reviews are controversial because they don’t match with the public’s opinion or the hype surrounding the book. That’s not to say that the book is “bad” or written poorly, but it didn’t meet the expectations of the reader. For me, this is what I felt while reading/listening to Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir.

            The protagonist is eighteen-year-old Gideon Nav, an indentured servant of the Ninth House, who are the Keepers of the Locked Tomb. Gideon’s life at the Ninth House has been nothing but harsh, neglectful, and mysterious. Readers meet Gideon as she tries to leave the Ninth House for the 33rd time. Instead, Gideon is bribed by Harrowhark Nonagesimus—the daughter and heir to the House of the Ninth—to train to be her cavalier so that she can train to become a Lyctor, one of the Imperial Saints for the Emperor. Gideon is promised her freedom if she does this “for the Ninth,” so Gideon and Harrow travel to the House of the First to train and to serve. There Gideon meets and interacts with: Teacher—one of the Keepers of the First House and servant to the Necrolord Heights; Abigail Pent and her cavalier, Magnus Quinn, of the Fifth House; Coronabeth Tridentarius and her cavalier, Protesilaus Eldoma, of the Seventh House; and several other heirs and their cavaliers from the other Houses, and a lot of skeletons. Gideon—while reluctant to serve the Ninth House—does take advantage of being away from the only place she’s known, leaves the planet, and trains in swordsmanship. Gideon does have to follow Harrowhark’s orders—to an extent—but, through her interactions with the other Houses and the tasks she manages to complete with Harrow, Gideon grows into the person she wants to be without interference from the Ninth House: helpful, caring, and strong (in a fight). Meanwhile, the other Houses learn that there’s more to the Ninth House than its titular role. 

            The plot of the novel is straightforward: The Emperor (of the First House) has called for the heirs of the other eight Houses to train to be Lyctors in order to serve as replacements for the current Lyctors. So, each heir and their cavalier travel to the First House where they are trained and are tested to the best of their knowledge and their strength. The nominated Hands must figure out the “puzzle” of their House with their cavalier so that the Hand can become a Lyctor. All of this is easier said than done, but all of the Hands are willing to do it. There are a few subplots in this novel. The first surrounds what it takes and what it means to be a Lyctor. Harrow wants to become one, and she is an extremely talented necromancer, but the testing to become a Lyctor is a process that must be solved by the Hand and the cavalier working together. This is interesting because Gideon and Harrowhark do NOT get along. So, in order to get what they both want, they’ll have to put up with each other to accomplish the goal. The second subplot is the mystery of the Ninth House and its establishment, from the Locked Tomb to the childhoods of both Gideon and Harrow. The other Houses are more curious by this than Gideon is, but Gideon doesn’t know, and Harrow isn’t going to talk about it to anyone. Or, will she? The last subplot focuses on the strange occurrences that begin to happen to the Hands and their cavaliers. Everyone is interested in new recruits arriving at the First House, right? All of these subplots work alongside the plot of the novel in order to embellish the world, the characters and the current predicament within this novel. 

            The narrative in Gideon the Ninth follows a present sequence from Gideon’s point-of-view. Her stream-of-consciousness gives readers insight into her thoughts (cynical, yet curious) while learning about the other eight Houses, which is something that didn’t interest her until now. The world-building—which includes the history and the culture of each House—comes from Gideon’s learning of them. The fight sequences and the many revelations come from Gideon’s P.O.V. Some of what is presented to her is told as a recitation and not as a flashback. This means that Gideon’s reactions are genuine and relatable, which make her a reliable narrator. The narrative is intriguing and is easy to follow. 

            The style Tasmyn Muir uses in her debut novel follows Gothic romance. In short—and, according to A Glossary of Literary Terms—“The locale was often a gloomy castle furnished with dungeons, subterranean passages, and sliding panels; the typical story focused on the sufferings imposed on an innocent heroine by a cruel and lustful villain, and made bountiful use of ghosts, mysterious disappearances, and other sensational and supernatural occurrences,” (p. 151). Fans of Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, The Monk by Matthew Gregory Lewis, Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë, and Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë are familiar with this genre of literature. However, I’m saying that Gideon the Ninth has elements of a gothic novel, NOT that it is one! The “villain” isn’t lustful, the supernatural occurrences—necromancy—is part of the world, and while it does have dungeons and secret passages, the First House isn’t described as being gloomy (when compared to the Ninth House). These gothic elements enhance the story the author is telling, which she does very well. The mood in this novel is anticipation. The summons from the First House does not only contain orders to attend, but also a chance to serve the Emperor, which is something the heirs are taught to do from childhood; and, their cavaliers get to serve their Houses. The tone in this book is dread. In a world where necromancy is the magic used and the setting is gothic, readers should expect more than a few unpleasant things to occur throughout the narrative. 

            I listened to the audiobook, which was narrated by Moira Quirk. She does a great job with narrating the story, voicing the various characters, and with the pronunciation of the characters’ names. I would not have been able to pronounce ANY of those names on my own, so to say that the audiobook was a huge help would be an understatement. The narration kept me engaged with the story as well.

            The appeal for Gideon the Ninth have been positive. Not only has the book, and the author, received a lot of fan and critical acclaim, but also has been nominated for several awards including the Nebula and the Hugo Awards. I can see how this book can become part of the (dark) fantasy canon and how it will have lasting appeal. However, this book neither was worth the hype nor was the best debut novel I’ve read. I’m not the only bookblogger who feels this way about this book. Then again, I’m not saying that you shouldn’t read it. The story itself kept my interest to the end; enough so that I want to read the sequel, Harrow the Ninth, when it is released in September 2020. This book wasn’t my favorite one, but my interest is piqued to where I’m okay with rereading parts of Gideon the Ninth in order to understand the sequel.

            Gideon the Ninth is an ambitious debut which hits enough marks to make for a good and fun reading experience. While I did not enjoy this book as much as other bookbloggers, the story and the world intrigued me enough to finish this book and wanting to read the sequel. Please understand that just because I didn’t enjoy this book doesn’t mean that you’ll feel the same way. That being said, if you want to read a story about necromancers and sword fighting, with gothic elements, then this book is for you.

My Rating: Read It (3.5 out of 5). 

Works Cited 

Abrams, M.H., and Geoffrey Galt Harpham. A Glossary of Literary Terms. 10th ed., Wadsworth, 

            2012. 

Why You Need to Read: “The Name of All Things”

A Chorus of Dragons #2: The Name of All Things

By: Jenn Lyons                                                                       Audiobook: 25 hours 46 minutes

Published: October 29, 2019                                        Narrated by: Saskia Maarleveld, Dan

Genre: Fantasy                                                                                   Bittner, Lauren Fortgang

                                                      

            In the twentieth year of the hawk and the lion, beneath the silver sword, the sleeping beast’s prison shatters. The dragon of swords devours demon falls as night takes the land, (61: Under The Waters). 

            Cliffhangers have always been an interesting method of maintaining the attention of an audience, etc. Narratives in all formats—oral stories, books, movies, TV shows, and video games—continue to use this method of storytelling in order to let the audience know when one part of the story ends and when another begins, or to continue the action and/or the pacing of a story where it left off. In the case of Jenn Lyon’s A Chorus of Dragons series (not a trilogy, but will be 5 books), readers get both and so much more in Book 2: The Name of All Things.

            The protagonist in this story is Janel Theranon, a noblewoman from Jorat (a dominion in the Quuros Empire). She has been looking for Kihrin D’Mon since their first meeting, which was during the events involving Kihrin, his family, and the Emperor. Unfortunately, Kihrin doesn’t remember meeting Janel—with good reason—but, Janel doesn’t hold that against him. Ironically, the two outlaw nobles have been searching for each other without knowing where to locate the other one. Janel had lived a simple life as the granddaughter and heir of Count Jarin of Tolamer. She identifies herself as a “stallion,” or a Joratese whose gender—not sex—and gender expression is male. After an attack on her home and the citizens, Janel masquerades as “The Black Knight” in order to bring the culprits to justice. Instead, Janel’s true identity is revealed and she is sent on a quest to find a mystical spear so she can kill a dragon. Accompanying Janel is her friend, Brother Qown, who is a chronicler. The two friends have a long and arduous journey in locating Kihrin and the spear. Janel is from Jorat, a dominion known for its horses, and she was raised to become the next Count of Tolamer. Janel is smart, headstrong and combative, and she is known for her fighting skills and her willingness to protect her people. 

            The plot in The Name of All Things has four parts. Part I introduces Kihrin (and readers) to Janel’s life as a Count and the first of the events which caused her to leave Tolamer. Part II has Janel learning about her heritage, her abilities, and about “The Name of All Things,” another one of the eight Cornerstones. Not to mention, Janel meets and puts up with Relos Var. Part III has Janel reciting prophecies while surviving captivity without her abilities and while “conforming” to her opposing gender. Part IV brings all of the events back to the present and has Kihrin and Janel fulfilling prophecies whether or not they want to do so. The plot delves into Janel’s life, especially after it’s been uprooted, which takes place at the same time Kihrin’s life was upended. This is essential to know because this lets the protagonists (and the readers) know that more was happening throughout the Quuros Empire, and it seems that Relos Var is the central figure. The subplots include Armageddon, and the quest for magical artifacts and mystical weapons, which is familiar to readers. Another subplot is the idea of gender and its practices in Jorat. While gender is binary amongst the Joratese (and in our reality), it is NOT determined based on genitalia, but on the societal role and how each individual expresses their gender. These subplots are necessary in order to keep the plot going at an appropriate rate and they keep the narrative going as well. Just like Kihrin, Janel has a role to carryout for a prophecy, but she doesn’t know what it’s going to be. 

            Once again, the narrative jumps between the past and the present, with 3 different narrators. Kihrin serves as the narrator for the present mostly because he’s the person everyone is looking for. The flashbacks of events are told from the points-of-view of both Janel Theranon and Brother Qown. It is important to know while both of these characters are recounting the experiences to Kihrin, Brother Qown is a chronicler, so most of his recounts have been written down already (probably). This means he’s writing down Janel’s experiences as they overlap his in order to provide a complete story. Remember, someone else is reading this completed chronicle. The world-building comes from Janel’s P.O.V. as she explains Joratese culture, magic, and the events that occurred while Kihrin was with the Black Brotherhood, and there is a lot. We learn more about Relos Var, and about a few recurring characters both new and old. The narrative can be followed and this is because the audience (remember the reader) knows the narrator(s) is reliable. Given everything that’s happened so far, it seems to be the only choice.

            The style Jenn Lyons uses for The Name of All Things follows the method of chronicles. Early written narratives were written down in order to include as many details as possible. In other words, whatever was said by the oral storyteller was written down by a chronicler. Early epic stories such as The Epic of Gilgamesh and The Aeneid were told orally and then written down, so however the length of the story was determined by the oral variant. A recent example of this style within a fantasy novel is The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss. A chronicler is writing the story of the protagonist as it is being told to him, so the length is determined by how much the storyteller is willing to say to the chronicler. The mood in The Name of All Things is hostility and chaos. The former is due to the demons and the dragons set loose within the Empire, and the latter is due to how and why Kihrin had to flee the Capital. The tone is motivation after enduring traumatic events. We know Kihrin’s story and we learn Janel’s. Both leave us with questions and admiration for them being able to continue living their lives, even if it is as fugitives. Please note: the maps, the Foreword, and the Appendices are essential for the reading of this book.  

            The appeal for this book have been positive. There are many readers who enjoyed The Name of All Things just as much or more than The Ruin of Kings. This series continues to explore the tropes of prophecies and the ideas and the origins regarding them. Plus, Jenn Lyons does an excellent job incorporating the themes of gender—not sex and sexual orientation—into her story. This is a reflection of the reality in fiction in that the concept of gender is more complex and more fluid than it being binary. The world-building is done in a way where readers know another character from a different region within the same country/empire is the focus. Not to mention, we get an update on what happened to some of the minor characters from the first book. Once again, I listened to the audiobook, and this time, there were 3 new narrators. It took some time getting used to the “new voice” for Kihrin, but after telling myself that Kihrin is supposed to sound “more mature,” it made the listening experience go smoothly. Saskia Maarleveld, Dan Bittner, and Lauren Fortgang keeps the narrative going at a good pace, and keeps the listeners engaged in the story. The cliffhanger at the end will have fans excited for The Memory of Souls, which is the third book in a 5-book series and NOT the third and final book in a trilogy as I stated in my review for The Ruin of Kings. Remember, authors will answer your questions. The Memory of Souls will be released in August 2020.

            The Name of All Things is an achievement in world-building and in overlapping narratives. The characters remain as engaging as before, the dragons and the magic remain deadly, and the immortals are in it for themselves. Not to mention, the world won’t end due to just one prophecy. I’m looking forward to reading what happens in the next book, and I know the chaos will continue to grow.

My Rating: Enjoy It (4.5 out of 5). 

Why You Need to Read: “Red Sister”

Book of the Ancestor: Book One: Red Sister

By: Mark Lawrence

Published: April 4, 2017

Genre: Fantasy, Grimdark

            A small thing in shapeless linen—not street rags, covered in rusty stains, but a serf’s wear none the less. She might be nine…This girl was a fierce creature, a scowl on her thin dirty face. Eyes black below a short shock of ebony hair, (Chapter 2).

            There is no doubt in my mind (or anyone else’s) that Mark Lawrence is one of the most popular fantasy authors in the world right now. Whether or not it’s Lawrence’s SPFBO Contest on his website, his latest novellas advertised on Amazon, or his popular novels, more and more readers are reading his books. I’ll be talking about his latest trilogy about a convent that teaches girls how to kill and to use magic. Red Sister is the first book in the Book of the Ancestor Trilogy. 

            The story follows Nona Grey, our protagonist, from the moment she is given to a child-seller—Giljohn, through the first few years—ages 9 to 13—of her education at the Convent of Sweet Mercy where she learns more about the abilities she’s been trying to hide from other people. Other characters include her classmates: Clera, Ara, Hessa, Jula, and Ruli; her instructors: Sisters Glass, Rose, Wheel, Apple, Pan, Rule, and Tallow; and other characters who interact with Nona including Raymel Tacsis, the man Nona almost killed. All of these characters are tied to Nona’s education and potential involvement surrounding the “Chosen One” prophecy. Unfortunately, Nona has to learn how to defend herself from the nobles who want her dead for attacking a nobleman in self-defense. Nona’s development goes from her being a poor illiterate child to a novice at the Convent to one of the “candidates” who could be the “Chosen One,” and saving the world. Throughout her early education, Nona learns who to trust and who to stay away from, and nothing is what it seems.

            The plot of Red Sister is Nona’s education at the Convent of Sweet Mercy as well as learning about the abilities she has within herself. In the world of Abeth, four tribes with remarkable traits settled and intermarried with non-magical humans. Centuries later, their descendants can have the traits of Gerant (great size), Hunska (speed and agility), Marjal (elemental magic), and/or Quantal (walkers of the Path and users of greater magic). While it is rare for anyone to have one of these traits, it is believed that one day a “Chosen One,” an individual with all four traits, will appear and save the world from ice and darkness. Nona is one of those who is suspected of being the “Chosen One.” This notion is slammed by many people at the Convent, including Nona herself. However, this subplot is essential to Nona’s character development as she demonstrates her abilities to her instructors because there are many who believe that the “Chosen One” is one of the girls at the Convent of Sweet Mercy. It is obvious that this subplot will become the plot in the later books, but for now, Nona’s education and discovery about herself is the plot in this book. Her interactions with everyone at the Convent who believes, or encourages, the “Chosen One” prophecy is essential to both the plot development and the development of all of the characters. 

            The narrative in Red Sister is limited omniscient narration. Readers get the point-of-view of Nona and a few other characters throughout the story, some of which are told in flashback. In fact, Nona’s first P.O.V. chapter isn’t until chapter 3 and it begins with a flashback. These multiple points-of-view allows for a swifter narration of the story. In the first two chapters (not including the Prologue), readers learn that Nona is about to be executed for attacking a nobleman who attacked Nona’s friend—who is executed before Nona. The very next chapter is the discussion of who gets “custody” of Nona: Partniss Reeve—the owner of fighters who bought Nona from Giljohn, and Sister Glass—the Abbess of Sweet Mercy—who has her own reasons for wanting Nona. Nona leaves with Abbess Glass knowing, at 9 years-old, to expect retaliation from the family of the man she attacked. Another chapter is told in flashback from the P.O.V. of one of Nona’s classmates, and there are several parts of the story that follows a few of the Sisters from the Convent. It does get confusing at times, but this narration helps with Nona’s character development from how Nona sees herself and everyone else, to knowing everyone else’s opinions about Nona. This is an interesting narration because it seems that how Nona sees herself is on par with how everyone else sees her. 

            The way Mark Lawrence wrote Red Sister is a change in direction fantasy readers have become used to: a prophecy is made, the one who fits the prophecy arrives and works with others in order to fulfill it. Only, the author decided to play with that concept and the expectations surrounding prophecy. Repeating ideas used by both J.K. Rowling and George R.R. Martin, Mark Lawrence demonstrates how prophecy can exploit and can harm several people with a (potential) notion that it will all be worth it once the world is safe again. The tone of this book is focuses on the hows and the whys prophecies come about and how more harm can and does come from them before they are fulfilled. Harry Potter’s life was altered because of a prophecy, and several characters throughout Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fireseries are affected by prophecy and suffer because of it. However, will the “prophecy” about the “Chosen One” come to fulfillment in Lawrence’s story? Some characters say, “yes” and many more say, “no.” The mood throughout this novel is how each character feels about the prophecy surrounding the “Chosen One.” And, it seems many of them find the prophecy more of a burden than a blessing. Maybe that’s what Lawrence’s style is supposed to present to readers, witnessing a “prophecy” come true and how everyone involved would react to it. 

            The appeal surrounding Red Sister have been immensely positive worldwide. Presenting a world in which privilege has more power over those with power, as well as a convent with killer nuns makes this novel a must read for all fantasy fans. I kept hearing about this trilogy from other fantasy readers who swore that it was worth reading. Fans of both Tamora Pierce and Robin Hobb will enjoy this series the most. Fans of George R.R. Martin will appreciate the influence and the Easter Eggs found throughout the book. Red Sister covers the first half of Nona’s education at the Convent and the buildup surrounding both the prophecy and Nona’s past. This makes the next book in the trilogy, Grey Sister, a must read for anyone who craves to know what happens next. I am one of those readers, and I can say that Red Sister is a must read for all fantasy fans.

            Red Sister is a novel that made its way from my TBR list to my Read list. Just like The Name of the Wind, Red Sister is a fun and a fast read that presents all sides of the protagonist to the other characters (and to the readers). The realism presented within this story is one of the many reasons why I enjoyed Red Sister so much. Nona is a well-developed character who knows what she is to those involved in her life and it makes you want to keep reading to know what happens to her next. It’s why I’m already reading Grey Sister and Holy Sister afterwards. Even if you’re not a fan of fantasy, Red Sister’s focus on the characters and their personalities is enough of a reason to start reading this book.

My rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!