Reading Check-In: July 17, 2021

A brief update about my readings.

But first, not that this should be a goal of mine, but I decided to reduce this year’s Goodreads (yes, I have a Storygraph account) reading goal from 100 books to 50 books. At the beginning of this year, I knew there I shouldn’t have pushed my limits this year due to other life factors (read my midyear post), but I decided to push my limits. Halfway through 2021, I knew that it would be better if I focused on finishing the books I was reading without worrying about how many I was reading. Honestly, I just want to read the books because I want to not because I’m worried about a number.

What book have you finished recently?

Both the plot development and the world-building were brilliant! And, we have a cover for the final book in this series! Both the cover and the finale are going to be EPIC!!!

What are you reading currently?

I’m about halfway through both of these books. And, I can tell you right now, you need to read both of them!

What will you read next?

I started reading these books when I received them as ARCs, but as you all know, I had to halt my reading to focus on other priorities. These books have been out for some time and I want to finish reading them before the end of the year.

As for recent releases and other ARCs, you’ll know which one(s) I start reading when I do.

Yes, I know that these are all fantasy books! You can read my recent sci-fi reviews in my previous posts!

The Midpoint of 2021: Favorite Speculative Fiction Books…So Far

Well, we’ve made it to the halfway point of 2021. I won’t begin this post with the usual current events, but I will mention that I’ve been enjoying ALL of the sporting events that are taking place (i.e. Euro Cup, Copa America, NBA & NHL Playoffs, Summer 2020/21 Olympic Trials, etc.). More attention has been given to both books and video games as those who’ve been at home continue to remember that they’re both entertaining and artistic.

As for me, I’ve been recovering from an exhausted winter and spring. This is because, as a few of you know, I went back to graduate school in order to earn a MA degree in Library and Information Science. For the last 2 years, I’ve been taking classes on an accelerated pace in order to complete the program sooner rather than later. No, COVID-19 wasn’t an “imminent” threat when I started back in Fall 2019; and yes, it was an interesting experience completing the program throughout the majority of the pandemic, work my part-time job outside of my residence, and continue working on my blog. In addition, I’ve only told my closest friends and acquaintances (including you) about this, meaning I’ve managed to work on a degree without my ENTIRE family knowing about it. And, unless they read this post, then it will stay that way until I am ready to make an announcement, which will be sometime after I get a job within my field (whenever that may be).

Why am I mentioning this now? Simple, it’s because during my last semester, I had to work on graduating on time and in order to do that I had to cutback on SOME of my reading. Those of you who follow me on Goodreads will notice that I’m behind on my Reading Goal and I’m lagging on completing the books I’m reading currently. I won’t get into my TBR piles both from Netgalley and Edelweiss! It’s NOT that the books are bad in anyway, I’m still mentally exhausted from all of the work I had to do in order to graduate on time; not to mention all of the other events called life.

I am starting to feel better and I started to catch up on both my reading and my writing (including reviews). You’ve noticed that I started posting reviews again, but remember I read faster than I write. Which brings me to another announcement: I realized that my 200th post is upcoming and I plan on writing another “special” piece in order to commemorate the milestone. What will it be? You just have to wait.

Now, for what you’ve been waiting for:

Books I’ve Finished Reading:

Across the Green Grass Fields

First, Become Ashes

Tower of Mud and Straw (It was nominated for a Nebula Award for “Best Novella”!)

The Bone Shard Daughter (Yes, it was released in 2020, but the sequel comes out later this year!)

The Light of the Midnight Stars

Chaos Vector (Just in time to read the final book in the trilogy!)

Fugitive Telemetry

Over the Woodward Wall (Along the Saltwise Sea comes out this fall!)

Shards of Earth (My 1st Book Tour!)

And, A LOT of Paranormal & Fantasy Romance Books by Indie Authors (That’s for a future post!)

Books I’m Reading Currently:

The Empire’s Ruin

The House of Always

She Who Became the Sun

The Unbroken

The Jasmine Throne

The Gilded Ones

Books I Want to Read by the End of 2021:

The Broken God

Firebreak

The Fire Keeper’s Daughter

House of Hollow

The Unspoken Name

The Witch’s Heart

For the Wolf

The Two-Faced Queen

The Next 2 Books in The First Argentines Series

The sequels of the upcoming books mentioned; more paranormal & fantasy romance books; and, several MORE books I can’t list here because otherwise, this post would be never-ending.

I don’t know whether or not I will be able to read the books mentioned by the end of this year. I’m still trying to catch up from last year’s TBR! So right now, I want to thank the authors, the other bloggers, Fantasy-Faction, all of the publishers and the agents for being both supportive and understanding as I continue to work my way through the last 6 months, and for encouraging me to continue working on my other writings.

Speaking of “other” writings, please keep an eye out for any upcoming essays and lists I will continue to share here. Any and all feedback are welcome.

We’re halfway through 2021. What are your plans for the rest of the year?

Also, if you haven’t already, then please read the essay I wrote that was published on the SFWA website! Click here to access it.

Reading Check-In: May 29, 2021

My schedule is starting to clear up, so here’s another update to what I’m reading.

What are you currently reading?

I should be halfway through this eARC by the end of this holiday weekend.

What will you read next?

I’m very anxious to start this eARC.

I will be reading this while listening to the audiobook.

As I mentioned earlier, I have more time to start reading again, and I have A LOT of catching up to do! Next weekend, I’ll be posting reviews again.

What you reading right now?

Most Anticipated Reads of 2021: Summer Edition

My workload is starting to lighten a bit and that means I can get back to reading, and I have A LOT of catching up to do! Here are some of the many books I will be reading throughout Summer 2021! Is it safe to call this my Summer Reading?!

I’m still reading my way through…

Next book on my list is…

I might have to read this book while listening to the audiobook edition.

Finally, I can start reading this book!

My excitement for this book hasn’t waned.

I just won a print edition of this book from FanFiAddict! Thank you!

It feels like I’m the last blogger to read this book.

I haven’t forgotten about this book!

Thank you to J.C. Kang for sending me a copy of this book.

I need to know what happens next in this series!

I’m not going to include ALL of the books I’ll be reading this summer in this post because it would be never-ending! That being said, I will be reading these 10 books throughout the summer. And yes, I will be writing and posting reviews for ALL of them, so be ready to read them!

Which books will you be reading throughout the summer?

Reading Check-In: May 1, 2021

I’ve managed to get some reading done this week.

What did you finish reading?

I LOVE MURDERBOT! Another excellent novella about our favorite snarky robot! I’m aiming to reading Network Effect this summer, finally!

What are you currently reading?

I’m still listening to Chaos Vector, and I hope to finish it within the next 1-2 weeks.

I’m back to reading Shards of Earth. The good news is because I haven’t made too much progress, which means I still remember everything that I’ve read so far.

What will you read next?

FYI: The title for Book 5, which is the last book in this series, has been released. It’s available on a certain website!

I am WAY behind on my reading (for reasons I’ll get into when the time is right). These are 3 of several books I hope to start reading by the end of the month.

Reading Check-In: March 20th 2021

Yes, I’m “borrowing” this idea from Realms of My Mind

This is not a review post. While I prepare to participate in some upcoming events (watch the livestream I participated for The Bone Shard Daughter here), I will continue to catch up on some of my reading. The reviews will be posted as they are written, but life is taking over more of my time. At the same time, I can’t just NOT post something!

What did you recently finish reading?

This debut novel is a brilliant blend of dark fantasy and horror. This book reminds me of Black Sun by Rebecca Roanhorse. I will explain how and why in my upcoming review.

This book is a beautiful follow up by Rena Rossner. This book comes out in April 2021. My review will be ready and posted by that time.

What are you currently reading?

I need to finish this audiobook.

I know, I know. I’m behind on my reading, but this book is so good!

I’m behind on reading this book, too. Believe it or not, for a YA novel, this book is just as brutal as my other current read.

What do you think you’ll read next?

I started this book last year, but I didn’t get to finish it by the end of 2020. I’ve heard nothing but amazing (and gory) things about this book, and I really, really want to finish it!

Who doesn’t love Murderbot?!

After THAT ending! I NEED TO KNOW what happens next!

Wish me luck! We’ll see what happens next week!

Why You Need to Read: “The Memory of Souls”

A Chorus of Dragons, #3: The Memory of Souls

By: Jenn Lyons

Published: August 25, 2020

Genre: Fantasy

Thank you Tor Books for sending me an eARC of this book! And, thank you for your patience on waiting for my review.

Note: There are a few spoilers from the first two books in A Chorus of Dragons series. 

            “The more I remember, the more I hate being able to remember,” Janel said. “It feels like another person taking over my mind. Someone else’s thoughts intruding on my own. I’m not…those people anymore,” (74: Who They Used to Be).

            The cast has been introduced. The conflict has been revealed. So, the story can continue, right? Many readers of any genre understand both stories and real life are more complex than they first appear to be. Fans of epics, sagas and (space) operas know to expect more from such stories, but they never know which direction the story will move throughout the narrative. The Memory of Souls, the third book in A Chorus of Dragons series, is the latest epic fantasy to provide more plot devices as the story reaches its climax. 

            All of the characters (and, I mean all of them) from the first two books in the series—The Ruin of Kings and The Name of All Things—are back as they all continue with their roles pertaining to the end-of-the-world. The protagonists include: Kihrin D’Mon—the man who murdered the last emperor of Quur; Janel Thernanon—the Black Knight; Thurvishar D’Lorus—the son of the last emperor of Quur, who was also an infamous necromancer; and, Tereath—a member of the Black Brotherhood. These protagonists were saved and are tasked by the gods to convince the vané—the last race of immortal beings—to perform a sacred ritual. Unfortunately, there are a few parties who attempt to stop this quest, but the reasons vary between each group. One group is the parents of the protagonists: Therin D’Mon and Khaeriel—Kihrin’s parents; Terindel—Tereath’s father; and, Tya—Janel’s mother, work to assist their kids with the strength of their abilities. Another group involves more relations to the protagonists: Khaemezra—Tereath’s mother; and, Relos Var—Thurvishar’s grandfather, are some of the antagonists in this story, but they are neither working together nor working towards the same goal. Then, there are the characters who are working towards their own goals. First, is Senera who is still working with Relos Var (blindly), and who still possesses ‘The Name of All Things.’ Second, is Suless, one of the immortal wizards who seeks vengeance on those who kept her captive. Last, is Talea who was the former slave girl Kihrin failed to save, but she appears to have gain her freedom. After the events in The Name of All Things, all of the protagonists and the characters realize the “actual threat” wasn’t Relos Var, but someone who is more ancient and more powerful than him. There are more characters, old and new, who appear throughout the story who either try to hinder or try to help the “heroes” save the world. Throughout this story, the protagonists develop as they journey on their quest(s) and learn more about themselves through each other. Granted some of the protagonists’ revelations are just as shocking to them as they are for us, but the way the protagonists handle them allow them to make the decisions they know are coming their way, and they won’t have to do the fighting alone. 

            There are two plots in this story. The first plot revolves around the “newest” threat to Quur, Vol Karoth, who after having one of his tethers cut loose by Kihrin (who was tricked into doing it by Relos Var) is closer to being freed from his prison. The second plot concerns ‘The Ritual of Night.’ Kihrin, Janel, Tereath and Thurvishar must convince the vané to perform the ritual so that Vol Karoth will be reimprisoned. The catch is the race who performs the ritual will lose their immortality, which is something the vané are not giving up willingly. So, how will the “heroes” convince the vané Vol Karoth is a threat who should not be unleashed onto the Quur Empire? There are two subplots in this novel, and both of them embellish and develop alongside the plots in this story. The first subplot concerns the mysterious character known as Grizzst. He is a famous wizard whose magic may or may not have saved Quur from destruction. And yet, so few people know who he is and what he’s done, so why is everyone searching for him now? The second subplot involves memories and past lives. There are the vane—who are immortal—and, the god-kings—immortal wizards—then, there is reincarnation. That’s right, on top of gashes and soul swapping, there is the reincarnation of souls. However, how often do you hear of people remembering their past lives? There were a few examples in The Ruin of Kings, but it’s happening a lot more in this book. In fact, some of what the characters are starting to remember might contain clues as to how to stop both Vol Karoth and Relos Var. These subplots are necessary because they refer back to the plots, which allows them to develop and to go at an appropriate rate.

            The narrative in this book is slightly different from the narratives in the first two books in the series. Unlike the first two books in the series—where the narration and the points-of-view go back-and-forth among 2-3 characters—this book follows the narratives of several characters—some old and some new. Similar to the previous books, all of the narrations are being compiled into a single chronicle which presents all of the events in the “chronological order” they occurred in. Most of the P.O.V.s are told in 3rd person omniscient with one narration told in 1st person. In terms of how the narration is present, pay attention to the title. This means the narration goes from stream-of-consciousness to memories—NOT flashbacks! Without giving away too many spoilers, these memories are essential to the narration because it provides even more insight into the world the author created and the actions several of the characters performed as well. Not to mention, the events of the past influence the decisions some of the characters make in the present for the future. Believe it or not, all of the characters are reliable narrators, and the narrative can be followed easily by the readers. 

            The style Jenn Lyons uses for The Memory of Souls continues with the chronicler. Unlike the first two books, there is only one oral speaker recounting events. All of the other characters have written their “experiences” and “gave” them to the chronicler to compile. In this book, readers witness the “arrangement” of all of the “participants” into one coherent text. And, let me say the chronicler (and the author) make it look easy. The mood in this novel is crusade. All of the parties go their separate ways in order to engage in a campaign either personal or divine. However, many of these campaigns go against (one or more of) the other one(s). When that is the case and the parties involved meet up, discord occurs—which is the tone in this novel. Readers should refer to the map, the glossary, the family tree, and the timeline throughout their reading of this book. The series is at the point where these references provide enough information and backstory without having to refer back to the previous books.

            The appeal for The Memory of Souls have been mostly positive. While most of the readers enjoyed this book, there were a few who either found the story to be confusing, or thought the series was “getting too long” (not my words). That being said, those readers might want to look up the difference between fantasy and epic fantasy. Not all fantasy series are trilogies! I’ve made this assumption with this series and other ones before the authors corrected me! This book and the previous books in A Chorus of Dragons belong in the (epic) fantasy canon. Fans who have stayed with this series this long can look forward to reading the next book in the series, The House of Always, when it is released (in 2021); especially with those cliffhangers, we all need to know what happens next. 

            The Memory of Souls is the climax of A Chorus of Dragons series, which will leave fans and readers with the (grimdark) question: does the ends justify the means? While the story doesn’t omit any of the detail, it does leave readers with several more questions about the direction the author seems to be moving it in. No one is expected to survive the end of this series, but we’ll have to read in order to find out who will live.

My Rating: Enjoy It (4.5 out of 5). 

Why You Need to Read…My Most Anticipated Speculative Fiction Books of 2021

How many books will I read in 2021? Let me rephrase the question: how many books coming in 2021 will I get to read in 2021? I ask this question because I’m still going through all of the books I didn’t get to read last year—including all of the books that came out in 2020. Yet, I can’t help myself because I’m so excited for all of the books coming out in 2021! These are just some of the numerous books I hope I get to read this year. Will I get to read them all in 2021? Probably not, but I’m going to aim to read these books at some point!

#1: Wayward Children #6: Across the Green Grass Fields by Seanan McGuire –> January 12th

            This next book in this fantasy series follows a girl who travels to a world where every horse creature resides. However, what happens there and whether or not the Visitor wishes to stay or leave has to wait until the book is released. Note: We’re getting 4 more books in this series!

#2: The Black Iron Legacy #3: The Broken God by Gareth Hanrahan –> May 20th

            It seems like we’re going to follow Carillon Thay’s adventures outside of Guerdon, which is probably for the best given what happened during the events in The Shadow Saint. Speaking of what’s going to happen to the city after all of the political and the divine betrayals? Looks like the world needs to be saved, again.  

#3: Bethel #2: The Dawn of the Coven by Alexis Henderson –> August 31st

            I was surprised and excited when I learned there would be a sequel to The Year of the Witching. I believe the story will focus on the aftermath of the events which occurred at the end of the first book. However, this is a dark fantasy series about witches and priests, so anyone can become powerful or die at any time. 

#4: A Chorus of Dragons #4: The House of Always by Jenn Lyons –> May 11th

            The way The Memory of Souls ended makes readers wonder how the author will continue her saga. What will the “heroes” do next to thwart the plans of the “threat”? And, is the House a place or an individual? 

#5: Magic of the Lost #1: The Unbroken by C.L. Clark –> March 23rd

            This is the first book in a new trilogy and it focuses on two young women. One is a soldier who was stolen from her home as a child. When her company has been sent back to her home to stop a rebellion, she doesn’t know which side she should be on. The other is a princess whose uncle has taken the throne which was meant for her. She needs a turncoat who is willing to balance treason and orders for what she sees as peace. All is fair in love and war. 

#6: Deathless #1: The Gilded Ones by Namina Forna –> February 9th

            This debut novel—which I believe was delayed due to the pandemic—follows 16-year-old Deka, who is about to be tested. If her blood runs red—normalcy—then she can carry on with her life. If her blood runs gold—impurity—then she faces a consequence worse than death. When Deka’s blood runs gold, she is given a choice: stay in her village to die, or leave and join the emperor’s army of girls—alaki, near immortals with rare gifts—like her to fight. Knowing she can find acceptance by serving the emperor, Deka leaves her home for the capital, where she learns that nothing is what it seems. Sounds like a great combination of Red Queen and The Old Guard

#7: Burning Kingdoms #1: The Jasmine Throne by Tasha Suri –> June 8th

            I LOVED the Books of Ambha Duology, so it should come as no surprise that I’m looking forward to reading Tasha Suri’s next book in her new series. A princess who is imprisoned by her dictator brother befriends one of the maidservants. When the princess discovers her maidservant’s secret, they join forces to get what they want—the former the throne and the latter her family. 

#8: Star Eater by Kerstin Hall –> June 22nd

            For several months, the author of The Border Keeper has been teasing her upcoming debut novel, and it cannot come soon enough. This book follows a female whose power must be preserved as ordered by her order. However, in order to preserve the magical bloodline, these women must give birth to the next generation, and the pregnancy kills these women. The protagonist is desperate for an escape, and she is granted the opportunity. All she has to do is spy on the highest ranks of her Order and learn their secrets. It shouldn’t be too difficult, right? 

#9: The Radiant Emperor #1: She Who Became the Sun by Shelley Parker-Chan –> July 20th

            This debut novel is described as “Mulan meets The Song of Achilles…(the) reimagining of the rise of the founding emperor of the Ming Dynasty.” That description alone should be enough to grasp the attention of any fan of historical fiction and fantasy. The year is 1345, China is under the rule of the Mongols. The story follows the second daughter in a Chinese family, who was given the fate of nothingness, while one of her brothers—Zhu— was given the fate of greatness. After Zhu dies, the daughter decides to use her brother’s identity to escape her fate and enters a monastery as a young male novice. After the monastery is destroyed by Mongolian forces, Zhu decides to claim the future that was meant for her brother. This is story is going to be EPIC!!!

#10: Empire of the Vampire by Jay Kristoff –> September 14th (in the U.S.)

            This upcoming series by the Australian author combines vampires with the legend of the Holy Grail. The protagonist is imprisoned not only for murdering the Vampiric King, but also for unknowingly destroying the holy order—The Silversaints—he served. Recounting his life and the events which led him to his current predicament, readers will learn first and foremost that the Holy Grail was a person, a teenager. Please Note: This series is NOT YA!!!       

#11: The Light of the Midnight Stars by Rena Rossner –> April 13th

            This historical fantasy is a retelling of Rabbi Isaac and his family, particularly his three gifted daughters. After an accusation of witchcraft forces the Rabbi and his family into exile, they learn of a dark force making its way across Europe. The sisters must choose whether or not to face the threat. This book is the author’s follow up to The Sisters of the Winter Wood, and fans of Alix E. Harrow, Katherine Arden and Constance Sayers will enjoy this book the most. 

#12: The Witch’s Heart by Genevieve Gornichec –> February 9th

            2021 continues the Norse-inspired books fantasy fans get to experience. This debut novel is a reimagination of Loki’s children as told by the woman who bore them and loved Loki—the witch, Angrboda. The story begins with Angrboda being burned by Odin for refusing to provide him with knowledge of the future—which Odin gains another way. After escaping and fleeing to the end of the world(s), Angrboda encounters Loki and fall for each other. Anyone who is familiar with Norse mythology recalls the role Loki’s children play in Ragnarök. Will Angrboda allow fate to happen, or attempt to change the future? 

#13: Firebreak by Nicole Kornher-Stace –> May 4th

            I learned about this book from author C.S.E. Cooney, and she had nothing but positive things to say about it. After reading the synopsis, I’m excited to read this book, too! The best way to describe this book is part 1984, part War Girls,and part Ready Player One. If you’re interest isn’t piqued after reading that, then I don’t know what else to tell you. 

#14: First, Become Ashes by K.M. Szpara –> April 6th

            I didn’t get to read Docile in 2020 (but, I will this year!), but I’m just as excited for the author’s second novel. The plot of this book sounds like it was supposed to start off as an RPG, but the quest ended before it could start. I’m curious to read what happens to the characters in this book. 

#15: The First Argentines Series by Jeff Wheeler –> Book 1: Knight’s Ransom release on January 26th

I got to read an eARC of Knight’s Ransom (click here to watch my first livestream Q&A panel with the author) and it’s an amazing beginning to a new series. Set about 400 years before the events in The Queen’s Poisoner, readers learn about the struggles the Argentine Family had when they first became the rulers of Kingfountain. The story is told from the perspective of one of the knights, Ransom, who witnessed many political and familial feuds as the Argentines commit to gain control over the entire realm, and survive. 

#16: Rook and Rose #1: The Mask of Mirrors by M.A. Carrick –> January 21

            This debut novel—written by a duo—presents a story of a con artist who hopes to secure a fortune and a future—for herself and her sister—by robbing a noble house. However, as this woman gets more involved with the family, she learns more about the aristocratic society, and the games they like to play. Soon, the protagonist has to choose between saving herself or saving an entire city. 

#17: Under the Whispering Door by T.J. Klune –> September 21st

            After reading the beautiful book that is The House in the Cerulean Sea—I hope to read The Extraordinaries this year—I had to find out what the author’s next book is going to be. This book takes a page from Greek mythology as the subplot of the story. The plot is about a recently deceased man who isn’t ready to cross over to the afterlife, so he resides with the ferryman at his tea shop for 7 days. Question: who is the artist of the cover art? I know it’s the same one who did the cover for The House in the Cerulean Sea

#18: The Legacy of the Mercenary Kings #2: The Two-Faced Queen by Nick Martell –> March 23rd

            This sequel to the author’s debut novel will focus on the aftermath of the events that occurred in The Kingdom of Liars. I curious to learn whether or not the queen really is two-faced. And, does she know what really happened to her father and her brother?  

#19: Wings of Ebony by J. Elle –> January 26th

            I won a copy of this book in a giveaway—which, will arrive on the book’s release day (an early birthday present for me!)—and I’m looking forward to reading it. This book focuses on a teenaged girl who is separated from her sister after their mother’s death to live on an island with her father and to learn about the heritage she never knew about. To me, this book sounds like a combination of Legendborn, Empire of Sand, and Percy Jackson, and I’m not complaining at all. 

#20: Wilderwood #1: For the Wolf by Hannah F. Whitten –> June 15th

            This retelling of the tales of Little Red Riding Hood and (Norse? or Greek?) mythology is the author’s debut novel. Red is the first Second Daughter born in centuries. This isn’t an issue for her family because while her older sister will get the Throne, Red is destined to be sacrificed to the Wolf in the Wood so he’ll return the world’s captured gods. Unfortunately, legends are not what they seem. The Wolf isn’t a monster, he is a man; and, Red isn’t a damsel, she has magic that she has to learn how to control in order to save her world. 

Additional Books to Lookout For: 

The Murderbot Diaries #6: Fugitive Telemetry by Martha Wells –> April 27th

The Tide Child #3: The Bone Ship’s Wake by R.J. Barker –> September 28th

The Ladies of the Secret Circus by Constance Sayers –> March 23rd

The Up-and-Under #2: Across the Saltwise Sea by A. Deborah Baker –> October 12th

Winter’s Orbit by Everina Maxwell –> February 2nd

The Bloodsworn Trilogy #1: The Shadow of the Gods by John Gwynne –> May 4th

Ashes of the Unhewn Throne #1: The Empire’s Ruin by Brian Staveley –> July 6th

The Desert Prince by Peter V. Brett –> August 3rd

The Protectorate #3: Catalyst Gate by Megan E. O’Keefe –> July 13th

Small Spaces #3: Dark Waters by Katherine Arden –> August 3rd

            As I mentioned earlier, this is some of the several books being released in 2021. Which books did I miss? What are you excited to read the most in 2021? Any debuts and/or new series others and I should look out for? Let me know! Happy New Year!