Why You Need to Read: “Catalyst Gate”

The Protectorate: Book 3: Catalyst Gate

By: Megan E. O’Keefe                                                           Audiobook: 20 hours 49 minutes

Published: June 22, 2021                                                        Narrated by: Joe Jameson

Genre: Science Fiction, Space Opera

            Rainier Lavaux had threatened everything and everyone Sanda had ever loved. Sanda had felt that loss once. And she’d burn the bitch to the ground rather than suffer through that pain all over again, (Chapter 1: Hello, Spy).

            Space operas remain popular in modern society, and there are 2 reasons for this popularity. One, the idea of traveling in space enraptures everyone’s imagination. Two, we all want to see fights within space with spaceships and blasters. Many movies and TV shows emphasis both of these—especially, the latter; however, like other narratives, the conflict must be addressed and be resolved before the resolution. In books of this genre, more emphasis is placed on the characters and the world-building because it is through their points-of-view that we learn more about the conflict, which is at an intergalactic level, literally. Catalyst Gate—the 3rd book in The Protectorate Trilogy by Megan E. O’Keefe—delivers on the characters’ story arcs, the conflicts, the world-building, and, of course, the space fights. 

            The same 4 protagonists have returned, and they’re all going after Rainier Lavaux, the entity set on destroying all of humanity. First, Commander Sanda Greeve has Bero, Grippy and her crew—made up of Arden, Nox, Conway, Knuth, Dr. Liao, and Tomas—are racing to stay steps ahead of Rainier as she searches the galaxy for the “keys” she needs to finalize her plans. Second, Director Keeper Biran Greeve is on a mission to “purge” those who “fell under” Rainier’s “influence.” Some are close to his job while others are with the Icarions. Third, Tomas Cepko has learned what he is in relation to Rainier and has decided to join the Greeve siblings on their mission to stop her. Last, Jules Valentine has committed numerous atrocities to keep her friend, Lolla, alive. This puts her at an advantage because she’s figured out how to stop Rainier once and for all. All of the protagonists and their companions are resolved to stopping Rainier, but first they have to confront how her actions in the past has led to this upcoming showdown. The war forces all of them to develop into the “heroes” they have to become; yet, their ordeals won’t be straightforward. 

            There are 2 plots in this novel, and they continue from the first 2 books in the series. The first plot revolves around stopping Rainier Lavaux, who is the mastermind behind all of the events and the incidents involving the protagonists, the Icarions, and Ada Prime. Obviously, there is more to Rainier than even the Keepers know, so where do all of the parties travel to in order to learn the entire story? How far back into the past does Rainier’s plans go? The second plot delves into Atrux, the planet where Jules once called home and where her life changed for the worse. Everything for Jules had started in the Grotta, which means Rainier’s plans might have started there, too. Jules’ search to cure Lolla could lead to answers on how to stop Rainier. There are a few subplots in this novel as well, and they wrap up the remaining plot holes in the series. Everything mentioned from the first book: the Chip, the Gates, the Icarions, the agent, etc., are reiterated so that the answers can be revealed, and so that the plots can conclude. 

            There is a difference in this narrative compared to the ones in the previous books; there are NO Interludes. This means the narrative occurs in the present—Prime Standard Year 3543—without flashbacks to the past; yet, we learn whose memories they belonged to and their relevance to the series. Once again, all of the narratives are from the points-of-view of all of the protagonists, and they are told in 3rd person limited through their streams-of-consciousness. It is through the protagonists’ P.O.V. that we learn all of the events that led to everything happening now, and the possibility of it all working out for them all. The truths and the revelations uncovered by the protagonists make all of them reliable narrators. 

            The style Megan E. O’Keefe uses in Catalyst Gate continues from the previous 2 books; only this time, the timeline is complete. Space operas are science fiction stories about galaxies with complex plots which take place in “near-future” Earth. Well, Earth is mentioned, but it is not from the “near-past.” The conflict goes back millennia—even before Prime Standard—which, influenced the events leading up to the present war in the narrative (sound familiar?) Mistakes were made in the past because of human error and alien technology; and now, posterity is paying the price for it. This is no longer a complex political conspiracy, but a war to preserve humanity; and, not everyone makes it out unscathed or healed. The mood in this novel is combative. All of the protagonists, the other characters, the antagonists, and the villain have been fighting. Only now, the war has begun. The tone in this novel is sacrifice. Each of the protagonists have a conviction and they are willing to defend those convictions at the cost of their lives.

            The appeal for Catalyst Gate have been positive. What started with a shocking start to this space opera trilogy concludes with a satisfying conclusion with several action sequences along the way. Fans of the first 2 books will be satisfied with the last book in this trilogy. Fans of Adrian Tchaikovsky and Martha Wells should consider reading this series. Fans of the space opera subgenre will appreciate this series, too. I listened to the audiobook for this book—actually, the entire trilogy—and, Joe Jameson’s performance was well done and very entertaining. I’m glad he did the narration for this trilogy.

            Catalyst Gate is an action-filled conclusion to an entertaining space opera trilogy. The characters and the plots sucked me into the story and kept me there after its end. The Protectorate Trilogy reintroduced me to space operas and reminded me why they are so much fun. Megan E. O’Keefe’s trilogy needs to be read by all sci-fi fans because they don’t know what they are missing.

My Rating: Enjoy It (4.5 out of 5).  

Why You Need to Read: “The House of Always”

A Chorus of Dragons, #4: The House of Always

By: Jenn Lyons                                                                       

Published: May 11, 2021                                                        

Genre: Fantasy                                                                                             

Thank you Tor for sending me an eARC of this book. I listened to excerpts of the audiobook, too.

Note: There are a few spoilers from the first three books in A Chorus of Dragons series. 

            After I have my answers. Time moves differently here. Only seconds will have passed when we return. There’s no need to hurry. There’s no point, (3: Secret Plans, Teraeth’s reaction).

            The beginning of the end has begun in this series. The climax occurred at the end of the last book—The Memory of Souls—yet the consequences of the actions and the choices in the previous chronicle must play out before the story can reach its conclusion. The House of Always is that book in A Chorus of Dragons; and A LOT happens before the story can begin to end. 

            If you believed the Dramatis Personae was long in the previous book, then be ready for even more callbacks in this one. Thanks to Senera, Kihrin D’Mon, Janel Thernanon, Tereath and Thurvishar D’Lorus reunite with Galen and Sheloran D’Mon, Qown, Kalindra Milligreest, Talea, Xivan and Talon. They all “meet up” after the battle that took place in the previous book in order to discuss their recent activities, the latest threat to Quur, and the upcoming threat(s) to the entire world. The last, of course, involves both Relos Var and Vol Karoth; so, what’s the plan? Each character has been busy with their own tasks, then—through magic—they find themselves inside an unusual place where they have a lot of time to sought through all of their thoughts—and those of their adversaries. 

            There are 2 plots in this story, and they involve 2 current conflicts. The first plot involves Kihrin’s “plans” for confronting Vol Karoth, which is easier said than done. The second plot delves into the current threat to Quur, which is something none of the protagonists or the main characters know anything about; or, do they? These plots are linked due to the most obvious reason, that 1 dilemma has to be resolved before the other one can be confronted. Meanwhile, there are several subplots within the story, and they are ALL relevant and essential to the plots of the story. All of the missions, the tasks, and the memories of ALL of the characters are linked to the ongoings throughout the rest of the Quuros Empire and the potential way to save it. 

            Once again, the narrative in this book is different from the narratives in the previous books. That being said, by now readers of this series should be familiar with the author’s narrative style. There are 2 Parts in this book; and, while the 1st 2 chapters in Part I and all of Part II are told in the present, the remainder of the narrative jumps back-and-forth amongst memories, flashbacks, previous lives, and streams-of-consciousness of ALL of the characters! In fact, a handful of other characters reemerge in this book. Which ones, and why? There are numerous P.O.V. chapters and passages which follows ALL of the characters. However, Kihrin’s point-of-view is the only one told in 1st person. The rest of the characters’ P.O.V.s are in 3rd person limited. There is a reason for this narration, and it is presented as it progresses. This narrative style allows for further development of the plots, the characters, and the world-building. And, believe it or not, the characters are reliable narrators, and their narratives can be followed easily. 

            The style Jenn Lyons uses for The House of Always can be argued as it being an additional buildup before the finale in the last book in this series. The final battle in the war is approaching, and the Dramatis Personae must decide which side they are on. Unfortunately, neutrality is no longer an option, so a decision has to be made. Not to mention, “the plan” must be finalized and agreed upon by EVERYONE. The style presented by the author reminds the readers what is at stake as the series approaches its end. The mood in this novel is ominous. All of the characters know what’s coming, and they must remain vigilant—which is the tone in this novel—as the final battle draws near. Once again, the readers can refer to the maps, the glossary, and the appendices for whenever they need to consult any information.     

            The appeal for The House of Always have been positive. Readers and fans who read through this book in the series gave it high ratings (4- & 5-stars). This is the book in which all of the pieces and the subplots from the previous books reemerge in this one, right before the series reaches its dénouement. This epic fantasy series continues to be compared to ones written by George R.R. Martin, Brandon Sanderson, and other authors who write similar books in this subgenre. To fantasy fans and readers who are still indecisive on whether or not to read this series, DO IT! If you’re worried about remembering all of the characters, then know that their stories continue throughout the series. If you’re concerned about all of the plots and the subplots, then take notes (I do). If you’re worried about forgetting what happens in all of the books leading up to the last book in the series—The Discord of Gods—then, now is the time either to re-read the previous books in the series, or to join (or to create) a group for a read along of this series! You are running out of reasons for NOT reading this series!

            The House of Always is a unique story that gears up readers for the series’ conclusion. You might wonder as to whether or not the narrative style leads to an essential part of the plot, and it does that and so much more. All of the elements within this series begins to end as the story and the characters’ fates gets closer to it. Now, we must wait until 2022 to learn who survives the apocalypse. 

My Rating: Enjoy It (4.5 out of 5). 

The Midpoint of 2021: Favorite Speculative Fiction Books…So Far

Well, we’ve made it to the halfway point of 2021. I won’t begin this post with the usual current events, but I will mention that I’ve been enjoying ALL of the sporting events that are taking place (i.e. Euro Cup, Copa America, NBA & NHL Playoffs, Summer 2020/21 Olympic Trials, etc.). More attention has been given to both books and video games as those who’ve been at home continue to remember that they’re both entertaining and artistic.

As for me, I’ve been recovering from an exhausted winter and spring. This is because, as a few of you know, I went back to graduate school in order to earn a MA degree in Library and Information Science. For the last 2 years, I’ve been taking classes on an accelerated pace in order to complete the program sooner rather than later. No, COVID-19 wasn’t an “imminent” threat when I started back in Fall 2019; and yes, it was an interesting experience completing the program throughout the majority of the pandemic, work my part-time job outside of my residence, and continue working on my blog. In addition, I’ve only told my closest friends and acquaintances (including you) about this, meaning I’ve managed to work on a degree without my ENTIRE family knowing about it. And, unless they read this post, then it will stay that way until I am ready to make an announcement, which will be sometime after I get a job within my field (whenever that may be).

Why am I mentioning this now? Simple, it’s because during my last semester, I had to work on graduating on time and in order to do that I had to cutback on SOME of my reading. Those of you who follow me on Goodreads will notice that I’m behind on my Reading Goal and I’m lagging on completing the books I’m reading currently. I won’t get into my TBR piles both from Netgalley and Edelweiss! It’s NOT that the books are bad in anyway, I’m still mentally exhausted from all of the work I had to do in order to graduate on time; not to mention all of the other events called life.

I am starting to feel better and I started to catch up on both my reading and my writing (including reviews). You’ve noticed that I started posting reviews again, but remember I read faster than I write. Which brings me to another announcement: I realized that my 200th post is upcoming and I plan on writing another “special” piece in order to commemorate the milestone. What will it be? You just have to wait.

Now, for what you’ve been waiting for:

Books I’ve Finished Reading:

Across the Green Grass Fields

First, Become Ashes

Tower of Mud and Straw (It was nominated for a Nebula Award for “Best Novella”!)

The Bone Shard Daughter (Yes, it was released in 2020, but the sequel comes out later this year!)

The Light of the Midnight Stars

Chaos Vector (Just in time to read the final book in the trilogy!)

Fugitive Telemetry

Over the Woodward Wall (Along the Saltwise Sea comes out this fall!)

Shards of Earth (My 1st Book Tour!)

And, A LOT of Paranormal & Fantasy Romance Books by Indie Authors (That’s for a future post!)

Books I’m Reading Currently:

The Empire’s Ruin

The House of Always

She Who Became the Sun

The Unbroken

The Jasmine Throne

The Gilded Ones

Books I Want to Read by the End of 2021:

The Broken God

Firebreak

The Fire Keeper’s Daughter

House of Hollow

The Unspoken Name

The Witch’s Heart

For the Wolf

The Two-Faced Queen

The Next 2 Books in The First Argentines Series

The sequels of the upcoming books mentioned; more paranormal & fantasy romance books; and, several MORE books I can’t list here because otherwise, this post would be never-ending.

I don’t know whether or not I will be able to read the books mentioned by the end of this year. I’m still trying to catch up from last year’s TBR! So right now, I want to thank the authors, the other bloggers, Fantasy-Faction, all of the publishers and the agents for being both supportive and understanding as I continue to work my way through the last 6 months, and for encouraging me to continue working on my other writings.

Speaking of “other” writings, please keep an eye out for any upcoming essays and lists I will continue to share here. Any and all feedback are welcome.

We’re halfway through 2021. What are your plans for the rest of the year?

Also, if you haven’t already, then please read the essay I wrote that was published on the SFWA website! Click here to access it.

Why You Need to Listen to: “The Original”

The Original

By: Brandon Sanderson & Mary Robinette Kowal                Audiobook: 3 hours 24 minutes

Released: September 14, 2020                                                       Narrated by: Julia Whelan

Genre: Science Fiction/Thriller

            Have you ever listened to any audio story or audio narrative without the text or any visuals to follow along to? I believe the most familiar example of this would be Peter and the Wolf. This Russian “symphonic fairy tale” is presented with specific orchestra ensembles representing each of the characters with a narrator telling the rest of the story. There are audiobooks which are standalones (as in no written edition) and it relies on an excellent narration and an engaging story so that the audience’s attention is maintained from start to finish. The Original by both Brandon Sanderson and Mary Robinette Kowal demonstrates a strong collaboration, but it is the talent of Julia Whelan that gives life to the story through her narration. 

            Holly is the protagonist. She wakes up in a hospital with no memory of how she got there; and, her husband, Jonathan, isn’t with her. She is told by doctors and by Detective Skylar that she is a Clone of the “Original” Holly, and that she was created on the orders of a warrant because Holly murdered her husband. On top of that bit of news, Holly learns she is an “Edited Clone,” which means that changes were made to the body and the DNA that can make a Clone “better” than the “Original.” Finally, Holly is told one more thing: no one can locate the real Holly, and she has to find her and kill her in order to survive. Holly leaves the hospital with her mission to carry out with a set of skills her “Original” doesn’t have and didn’t ask for. The Clone Holly has to shift through shared memories, to survive attacks from people she doesn’t recognize, and to find her Original within 4 days or cease to exist. Does Holly want to live the life of her Original? Can she find her? And, if she does, then will she be able to kill her? 

            The plot is very interesting. A clone awakens, learns the reason for her creation, told her purpose, and is sent to carry it out. Of course, that’s the short version of it. Holly has less than 4 days to find her Original before she ceases to exist because a Clone and its Original cannot exist at the same time. Detective Skylar explains to Holly that after she finds and kills her Original she can live her life for the duration of hers. Meanwhile, Holly is trying to figure out what led her Original to kill Jonathan. She goes through her memories of her relationship and love for Jonathan, his occupation and hers, the last time they were together before the murder, and the murder itself. This leads to Holly having more questions than answers, but she decides that finding her Original and demanding to know why she killed her husband before killing her is how she is going to complete her mission. The subplot is the elements of world-building, many of which includes the idea behind clones and other scientific practices the society performs. In addition to clones, nanotechnology exists so that people can reverse aging and accelerate healing. Yet, Holly discovers that nanotechnology and clones are not wanted by everyone, including Jonathan. So, if Jonathan was against the idea of clones, then why is Holly being promised with a clone of Jonathan after she kills her Original? The subplot develops alongside the plot in which both the society and the conflict are explained further as the story continues. 

            The narrative follows the point-of-view of Clone Holly. This makes for an interesting P.O.V. experience because none of her past experiences are hers, and she cannot remember everything of her past before she was created. This is important to know because this means that when Holly remembers something, it is NOT a flashback! It is NOT amnesia! This is because, one, the memory isn’t hers; and two, Holly can’t remember all of the details surrounding those memories. Holly knows that she was created without all of her memories intentionally. This revelation does make Holly’s stream-of-consciousness very interesting because in between Holly’s confusion and exhaustion, the audience knows how frustrated Holly is throughout everything that is happening to her. This knowledge and the experience Holly goes through makes her a reliable narrator. As a clone, she is dependent on what is being told to her. It is obvious she is being manipulated, but it is not her fault. The audio presentation makes the narration easy to follow. 

            The style both Brandon Sanderson and Mary Robinette Kowal used for The Original delves into two “traditional” conflicts: individual versus society, and science versus nature. Reiterating these conflicts within this story not only demonstrates the reality within the fiction, but also leaves the audience to question their identities as well. The word choice used throughout the narrative was done intentionally by the authors so that the audience can comprehend the story with the scientific terminology, which allows for a thought-provoking story without too much thought. The mood in the story is anxiety. Both the protagonist and the audience are anxious throughout the story as both the truth and the existence is at stake for a clone who isn’t sure whether or not she wants to live. The tone gives the vibe of a cautionary tale. This story serves as a warning against scientific advancements and government control over individuals within a society. 

            This audiobook was narrated by Julia Whelan, and I have to say that I am beyond impressed with how she presented this story. Her voice of the characters are easy to distinguish and her voice for the narrative is enough to keep the audience immersed in the story. If it weren’t for the chapters, then it would have been easy to get lost in the story until the very end. I’m looking forward to hearing her narrate other stories in the future. 

            The appeal for this audiobook have been positive. Many listeners seem to enjoy the story, but have mixed feelings of it being just an audiobook. I know many readers don’t always listen to audiobooks, but what makes The Original standout is that it’s only available as an audiobook. I was able to keep up with the story with the narrator’s pace, but I understand if other listeners did not feel the same way. That being said, both Brandon Sanderson and Mary Robinette Kowal have confirmed during a livestream on YouTube that there is no hurry for a written edition of The Original. If an adaptation were to be done for this audiobook, then I could see it as a graphic novel—both the action sequences and the story’s tone is enough to visualize a graphic novel. Fans of science fiction and readers of novellas will enjoy this audiobook the most. In fact, anyone who is on a long commute and/or are doing household chores should listen to this audiobook. This is because by the time you’re done with the commute or with your chores, you should be done with the story and not have to worry about losing your place within the audiobook. 

            The Original is a brilliant collaboration between two bestselling authors of the speculative fiction genre. Do not be intimidated by the fact that this is an audiobook. If you’ve listened to Broadway musicals on audio, then you can handle a sci-fi thriller novella on audio. At least listen to the story for the second twist in this story! Did you really believe these authors would include only one twist? I’m not going to tell you what it is, so you’re going to have to listen to the story to find out what the other twist is, and it’s not what you think it is!

My Rating: Enjoy It (4 out of 5). 

Why You Need to Read: “The Starless Sea”

The Starless Sea

By: Erin Morgenstern

Published: November 5, 2019

Genre: Fantasy/Urban Fantasy/Magic Realism

            Only the singular section of “Sweet Sorrows” is about him, though pages are missing, upon close inspection there are numerous vacancies along the spine. The text comes back to the pirate and the girl again but the rest is disjointed, it feels incomplete. Much of it resolves around an underground library. No, not a library, a book-centric fantasia…(Book I: Sweet Sorrows).

            I have a confession to make: I haven’t read The Night Circus, yet. Yes, it’s shocking that I’m reviewing The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern before reading her impressive debut novel. All I will say is this, I was more curious about the author’s follow-up novel than her debut novel and I made the effort to read the recent book before the previous one. I didn’t want to write a review in which I make the same argument that has been done to both Harper Lee and Jeff Eugenides. So, without further comparison or explanation, here is my review of The Starless Sea, Erin Morgenstern’s homage to New York City and libraries around the world.  

            There are three protagonists in this novel. The first is Zachary Ezra Rawlins, a graduate student who is studying Emerging Media Studies at a university in Vermont. He is spending his semester break reading his favorite books alongside classic books. During another trip to the university library, he comes across a book titled, Sweet Sorrows, which has no clear hint as to what the story is about. After reading a section which refers to a moment in Zachary’s life with the description: “The boy is the son of the fortune-teller,” the book goes missing from his possession. Zachary decides to investigate the book’s origins, the library it originally came from, and the opportunity he missed all those years ago. The second protagonist is Dorian, a member of one of the organizations who knows about Zachary, the book—Sweet Sorrows, and the Starless Sea. One thing which is a mystery (at first) is for whom is Dorian working for, what his goals are, and why he keeps switching allegiances. Last, is Mirabel, a resident of one of the Harbors of the Starless Sea, who assists Zachary on his “quest” to rescue Dorian and to save the Starless Sea from destruction. Other characters who are relevant to the story are: the Keeper—the keeper of the Harbor, Kat—Zachary’s classmate from the university, Allegra—a woman who wishes to seek the destruction of the Starless Sea, and Madam Love Rawlins—Zachary’s mother, who is a fortune teller. All of these characters assist with the development of the protagonists through their knowledge of the Starless Sea, and the knowledge of the protagonists’ roles in saving the library. Their love or hate of each other will determine how they will get through the dilemma they’re in together. 

            The narrative switches between the characters, the settings (especially time) and the sequence. It might start off as confusing, but the breaks and the change in narrative allows the reader to know what each character is experiencing in relation to the plot. The narrative has six sequences that follow the characters on their journey as they learn about the Starless Sea, their connection to it, and the ongoings of the world beyond the Harbors and the Starless Sea (our world). These parts are the titles of the books written about and read by all of the characters. Due to this sort of narration, all of the POVs are told in 3rd person omniscient with each character being a reliable narrator. This is because their streams-of-consciousness and points-of-view allow readers to understand the reasons for their actions within the story. And, while the jump in sequence between the past and the present start off confusing, the readers will get used to this narration and will find it easy to follow. 

            The style Erin Morgernstern uses in The Starless Sea is specialized, but not typical. The idea of there being a story (or several stories) within a story is nothing new; and, it shouldn’t be new to fantasy readers. The concept of different forms of literature (i.e. prose and excerpts) written within one book is not new. Yet, the way the author writes her story using those practices are what makes her story so captivating to read. Add to this the description of New York City and its notable landmarks, and allusions to various books and pop culture references presents The Starless Sea as a creative tribute to Manhattan and to nerds everywhere! And, as a former grad student who studied emerging media studies, all of the references to “the Hero’s Quest” and video games was a nice touch to an inner group of the nerd community (Thank You)! The mood in this story is one of urgency. The urgency of meeting someone, the urgency of saving something, and the urgency of value are essential to the story. The tone is the meaning of that urgency for a group of individuals who are connected to each other, but have different ways of dealing and handling with an urgency. Not everyone is going to react the same way to an urgency, and that is essential to know for this book.

            The Starless Sea was one of the most anticipated novels of 2019, and it was on my list of best speculative fiction books of 2019. While it received praise from NPR, Amazon, and The New York Times, there have been some mixed reviews from readers. Without getting too deep into those criticisms, I knew that this book would be different from The Night Circus, and the style and the format of the book did not “interrupt” my reading of this book. Readers who’ve read books similar to The Sisters of the Winter Wood will not be surprised by the changing sequence of narration. Readers who’ve read books similar to Gods of Jade and Shadow should be familiar with the actual places used as setting—in which you can follow along with a map. And, readers who’ve enjoyed The Ten Thousand Doors of January—or, any portal fantasy story—should know the idea of Doors and other worlds. The Starless Sea stands apart from the books mentioned because of the story the author wrote for her readers. It seems to me that many readers were so caught up with comparing this book to the author’s previous one that they failed to recognize and to enjoy the story they were reading. The Starless Sea is about the love for people who share one’s interests and the love shared amongst a group of individuals for a landmark; it is a story about love and what someone will do for it.  

            The Starless Sea is the long-awaited follow-up book by Erin Morgenstern. The story consists of well-developed characters, elements of mystery and love all within a magical library that could exist below Manhattan’s subway system. This is a beautiful story meant for fans of portal fantasies and urban fantasies. Whether or not you’ve read The Night Circus should not dictate on reading The Starless Sea, you’re the one missing out on a great story.

My Rating: Enjoy It (4 out of 5).