Why You Need to Read: "War Girls"

War Girls #1: War Girls

By: Tochi Onyebuchi

Published: October 15, 2019

Genre: Science Fiction/Dystopian Fiction/Historical Fiction/Young Adult

            Their resources. The blue minerals buried beneath Onyii’s feet and, farther out, beneath the ocean floor. This is what the Nigerians are killing Biafrans for. Not a morning passes that Onyii doesn’t think about setting charges to those things and blowing them into coral debris, (Chapter 1). 

            Everywhere in our world, there is conflict; and, unfortunately, some of these conflicts do not resolve but buildup until war breaks out. Once war begins, everyone and everything gets sucked into it, leaving no one and nothing unscathed. Some wars receive endless media coverage and propaganda gaining the attention of the world, while others are ignored until the war has ended and the warring sides are left to rebuild their homes with whoever and whatever survived. Tochi Onyebuchi retells the wars in Africa—particularly the Biafran War a.k.a. the Nigerian Civil War from 1967 to 1970—during the second half of the twentieth century. War Girls is a dystopian YA novel about family, identity and war. 

            The story follows two sisters, Onyii (16) and Ifeoma, or Ify, (10), who live in seclusion with other girls—both orphans and former soldiers—in the jungles in Southeast Nigeria in the year 2172. War has occurred for years between Biafra and Nigeria, and both sides are guilty of “recruiting” children for the war effort, so several surviving children and adolescents have banded together in camps in order to avoid the armies. They live off the land and off the grid. Onyii—who has darker skin—is a former soldier who stepped back from the war after she lost her arm in a battle. Ify—who has lighter skin—is a tech genius who dreams of attending university and traveling to one of the space colonies. She is the smartest student at the makeshift school at the War Girls’ camp and she is frustrated by the lack of resources they have, and she desires to have more for herself and her sister. At the same time, Onyii and the other former soldiers stay alert for any possible attacks. During an ambush, the sisters are captured and separated—Onyii by the Biafrans and its brigadier general, and Ify by the Nigerians and their soldiers, siblings Daren and Daurama—and for 4 years they live their lives believing the other one is dead. During the separation, the sisters develop into themselves as they battle their inner demons. Onyii struggles with how being a soldier has affected her and what that means for herself and her comrades: Chinelo, Kesandu, Adaeze, and Ngozi once the war is over. Ify witnesses the traumas and the propaganda surrounding war and its aftermath. She believes she is smarter than everyone else and wants to find a way to end the war for good. Onyii and Ify grow up as the war becomes an endless event, but it is their interactions with the other characters that push these young women into doing what they can to make sure their side wins. As the sisters develop, they become more devoted to their allies until unforeseen events leave them asking who they are fighting for and why. The war turns the sisters into propaganda for their “side” and they must find a reason for living beyond the war. 

            The plot of War Girls focuses on the war between two nations and how the war has lasted for so long that many people cannot remember a time when the war was taking place. As the story continues, so does the war and there are those who want a ceasefire and others who can only benefit if the war carries on. The subplot is the effect war has on soldiers and civilians, with the main focus on children: child soldiers, victims and survivors of raids, and those who’ve been subjected to experiments. Whether or not Onyii and Ify know it, they are both victims and perpetrators of the war. Children who know nothing but war unknowingly get involved in it and this is presented to readers over and over again. This subplot is essential to the plot because it enhances the plot as to how a region of the world ravaged by an incessant war affects the younger generation. These children grow up becoming familiar and numb by war and that is a dangerous and a disturbing factor expressed within the novel. 

            The narrative takes place over the course of five years from the points-of-view of both Onyii and Ify. Their stream-of-consciousness display their thoughts as they act and react to everything around them as the events of the war take place. Onyii’s point-of-view takes the readers into battles and missions she participates in and all of the victories and the losses she experiences—both physical and mental—and what being “the perfect soldier” does to her. Ify has the opportunity to live as a civilian in Abuja, but her new “status” gives her clearance to witness the long-term effects of war and the factors that keep it going. The mistakes and the changes in their desires present the sisters as reliable narrators, especially when both are given the choice either to end the war, or to be labeled as a traitor by their allies. Both narratives are written in ways that can be followed and understood by the readers. 

            The way Tochi Onyebuchi wrote War Girls was intended for a young adult audience and anime fans. Adult readers can read this book and explain the themes of war to the younger ones, while anime fans can compare this story to popular series and films such as Gundam Wing and Grave of the Fireflies. Writing about war with children and adolescents as the characters allow the target audience to relate to the characters and any refugees they may or may not meet one day in the future. The adults, who had to read similar narratives during their school days, gain an understanding of a war that received little attention by the news media because some conflicts had neither “benefits” nor “interests” to the rest of the world. The mood is the how Earth has been destroyed by climate change and nuclear warfare, which is then abandoned by the world powers for space colonies and leaving others behind struggling to survive on a planet that is unlivable with hostile inhabitants. The tone is how war turns everyone into participants, both willing and unwilling. War leaves no innocent victims. War consumes everything. 

            War Girls will appeal to science fiction and dystopian fiction fans of all ages. In addition, anime and manga fans will recognize the influences found within the battle sequences. Similar to Lord of the Flies and Battle Royale: The NovelWar Girls explores how war and internal hostilities influence and affect the younger generations. The novel provides an interesting look into the recent history of African countries such as Nigeria, Somalia, etc. and how the rest of the world either ignored or profited from those conflicts. While it is too soon to determine whether or not War Girls will be read in schools, it is already part of the YA dystopian canon alongside The Giver and The Hunger Games. There are rumors of a follow up book to War Girls, but there haven’t been any announcements (as of when this review was posted). 

            War Girls is a moving novel about sisterly love and how war denies people simple needs such as family and purpose. Tochi Onyebuchi composed a story based on actual events and witness testimony with mech technology and space colonies into a book for both adolescent and adult readers. The battles will put you in the center of the action and the characters become part of your literary family, which makes this a very poignant story of love, loss, family and war. 

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW (5 out of 5)!!!

TV Episode Review: “Deadly Class: Noise, Noise, Noise”

Note: There are some minor spoilers in this review. You have been warned. 

The second episode in the new series displays the aftermath and the continuation of the events that took place in the Pilot episode. Marcus is traumatized by his first kill, but cannot take any credit for participating in the murder, which Willie has no problem doing. Unfortunately, for Marcus and the rest of his classmates, they have to participate in a pop quiz in order to redeem themselves. Marcus and a few of the other students pass, the rest of class fails.

            The majority of the episode reminds teacher, students, and viewers that the students at King’s Dominion are adolescents who behave like adolescents. So, a house party—set up by one of the “goop” students—is the distraction that is welcomed. The party is typical: everyone shows up, the house gets thrashed, everyone gets drunk and high, energy and emotions are running high, then the cops appear and the party is over. The party is where viewers learn more about the students from the school. Now, there are some minor changes from the graphic novel, but it fits well with what viewers are to expect from the show, which is most of the students are using falsehoods in order to maintain a reputation. This “act” is common in all adolescents. 

            Marcus seems to be the only one who doesn’t have a problem venting his emotions. And yet, viewers learn by the end of the episode that that is not true. On top of the cliché moments in this episode, viewers realize that King’s Dominion’s roster contains a lot of frauds. It makes viewers wonder why certain characters are more comfortable with killing over their insecure classmates. And, by the end of the episode, viewers will ask: What else happened to Marcus? What will happen to Maria? Is Saya comfortable with “spying” on her classmates?

            In all, Noise, Noise, Noiseis an episode that focuses more on the development of the characters and the setting. The 1980s was a turning point for health risks and international relations in the United States. And, we see how the characters continue to deal with puberty, angst and social welfare. While the episode leaves the viewer with more questions than answers, we know that it won’t be long until we get the answers that we want.  

Why You Need to Read: “Vicious”

By: V.E. Schwab

Vicious: Villains: Book 1

Published: September 24, 2013

Genre: Adult/Science Fiction/Fantasy/Paranormal/Superheroes

            Victor had set the deadline to rattle him, put him on edge. He was disturbing Eli’s calm, like a kid dropping rocks into a pond, making ripples, and Eli saw him doing it and still felt rippled, which perturbed him even more. Well, Eli was taking back control, of his mind and his life and his night. (Part 2, Chapter XXII).

            V.E. Schwab’s first adult novel is part X-Men, part The Count of Monte Cristo, and part Frankenstein. Let me make this clear: in my opinion, those popular works influence this story, but this novel will grasp your attention from its opening pages. By the time you finish reading this book, you’ll be a fan of V.E. Schwab!

            The plot is centered on an upcoming showdown between two former college roommates turned frienemies: Victor Vale and Eli Ever. However, this showdown is not focused on who is more powerful, or who is the “true” criminal, it is to settle their college rivalry once and for all! Yes, Victor Vale and Eli Ever display the worst toxic masculinity I’ve ever read in a book! And, both men have NOT seen each other in a decade, yet one never forgot the other. 

            The narrative has multiple P.O.V.’s across the events of the past and the present. Readers learn about Victor and Eli’s relationship, their current companions and how they all met, and the concept of EO’s and why those who identify as EO’s are “changed individuals.” While the narrative is broken into fragments transcending time, the method works because it connects the past to the present in order to understand the motives and the traits of each character. In addition, it allows for the reader to understand why the series is titled Villains.

            The characters—Victor, Eli, Serena, Sydney, and Mitch—are the focus of this novel. It is important to know that Mitch is the only one of these main characters who is NOT an EO; and yes, that is relevant to the story! Victor and Eli are former college roommates who became EO’s deliberately, while Serena and Sydney Clarke—yes, sisters—became EO’s after an accident. Ironically, the Clarke sisters meet up with Victor and Eli, placing them on opposing sides of the “villains” spectrum. One side believes they are “heroes” and the other side knows they are the “villains.” Their pasts and the interactions with each other explains the pathology of the characters which tells the readers that EO’s aren’t terrifying, but malicious people who happen to be EO’s are the actual villains.

            The style of Viciouswill remind you of either a graphic novel/comic book, or a thriller story. Schwab builds suspense by having the characters recall the events of the past, which are the reasons the opposing pairs are determined to faceoff against each other. The author goes even further with the concept of EO’s, one must survive a near death experience, but he/she/they lose something else in return. In other words, an individual survives death, gains an ability of some sort—“good” or “bad”—but that person loses something in return as a grotesque payment. The four main characters were already damaged individuals before, but now their natures have become reduced even more because they became EO’s. 

            The appeal surrounding this novel is interesting. Vicioushas a cult following that’s lasted these past five years, and it’s a shame because I realized (and I could be wrong) many people still have not read this novel. I want to say that it is because of the cult following, not the mainstream publicity, that Schwab is able to craft both books to her liking knowing her fans will read them no matter what, and she is right! 

           The sequel, Vengeful, was released in September 2018 both to critical acclaim and to ardent readers. Vengefulwon the “Goodreads Choice Awards 2018” in the “Best Science Fiction” category. Congratulations to V.E. Schwab on the win!

            If you read my Why You Need to Read: These Books While Waiting for “The Winds of Winter” post, then you already know that I highly recommend this novel! This dark paranormal novel takes all of its influences and takes it to a whole new level. And, the author goes into why rivalries—friendship and family—can become toxic to the point of obsession. If you are looking for a recent speculative fiction novel that stands apart from others in the genre, then pick up Vicious!

My Rating: MUST READ IT NOW!