Why You Need to Read: “Chaos Vector”

The Protectorate: Book 2: Chaos Vector                               

By: Megan E. O’Keefe                                                           Audiobook: 19 hours and 5 minutes

Published: July 28, 2020                                                      Narrated by: Joe Jameson

Genre: Science Fiction/Space Opera

            “It’s been two years. Why would things escalate now?

            Graham smiled slyly. “Because you’re back, kid. Two years and some change was about the time you disappeared, about the time Icarion lost control of Bero. Nakata, Kenwick, Lavaux—they’re all tangled up somehow, and Harlan and his crew crossed paths with that lot,” (Chapter 6: Can’t Count on a Spy). 

            Cliffhangers have always been an interesting concept in storytelling. I’ve mentioned in previous posts that cliffhangers are excellent ways to keep the audience engaged in the narrative. There are several cliffhangers the storyteller can use, but depending on the narrative, one fits better than others. In the case of Megan E. O’Keefe and her The Protectorate trilogy, Chaos Vector—the sequel to Velocity Weapon—picks up immediately after the revelations in the first book. And, that includes both the plot and the pace.

            There are 4 protagonists in this book. First, is Sanda Greeve, who went from “Hero of Ada Prime” to suspected murdered of a Keeper. Now, she’s on the run to clear her name after a brief reunion with her family and to discover what is in the Keeper Chip that is embedded in her skull. After learning some about one of her fathers’ past, Sanda joins up with Arden, Nox and everyone else in Harlan’s crew in order to solve 2 mysteries with 1 person of interest, Rainier Lavaux. Second, is Biran Greeve, Sanda’s younger brother and one of the Keepers. Life as a Keeper begins to catch up with Biran as he does damage control, first for his sister and then for the Keepers; and, he begins his investigation into the missing Keeper, the stolen Keeper Chip, and The Light of Berossus, all while trying to figure out who among the other Keepers are his allies. Third, is Jules, whose circumstances and previous actions now have her working for Rainier Lavaux. She hides herself from her friends as she does everything she can to save one of them, but is she being played? Last, is Tomas Cepko, the agent from Nazca whom Biran hired previously. Now that his mission is complete, Tomas is given a new assignment; and, it’s Rainier Lavaux. All of the protagonists and the other characters are beginning to comprehend the effect their recent actions have on one another, for the rest of Ada Prime, and the Icarions. Not to mention, what happened to Bero? 

            The first plot in this novel carries over from the first book, only now there are more questions than answers. But, everything revolves around Rainier Lavaux, the wife of the murdered Keeper. Somehow, she knows about both The Light of Berossus and the Keeper Chip; but, which one will she go after? And, why is she so interested in Jules? The second plot revolves around the Keeper Chip lounged in Sanda’s skull. Sanda is on a mission to discover the contents on the Chip before Ada Prime’s enemies track her down and reclaim it. Meanwhile, Biran looks into which Keeper went missing and why that Keeper’s Chip stands out more than the other ones. There are 2 subplots, which develop alongside the 2 plots which enhances and expands the narrative. The first one focuses on Jules’ efforts to thwart Rainier Lavaux’s plans, which pulls Jules further into an intergalactic conspiracy that she never would have imagined getting involved in. The second subplot delves into the events of the past which may or may not have impacted the present. As everything converges, it begins to make sense. 

            The narrative is more straightforward than in the first book. There are 2 years that the narrative focuses on: Prime Standard Year 0002 (the past) and Prime Standard Year 3543 (the present). All of the narratives are told in the 3rd person limited in the present tense from the points-of-view of the protagonists. Unlike the previous book, the sequence of events allow the narrative to be followed easily by readers (and by listeners). The streams-of-consciousness of the protagonists not only give the audience a complete understanding of the revelations, but also make the characters reliable narrators.

            The style Megan E. O’Keefe uses in Chaos Vector flows from Velocity Weapon. There is a political conspiracy that is starting to unravel, but the majority of the citizens seem focused on the continued conflict between 2 feuding nations. This conflict reflects the mood of this novel which is distraction. The leaders of Ada Prime do not want their citizens to worry about “threats,” so they make announcements about falsehoods to keep everyone “calm” as they continue to work on a cover-up instead of addressing the conflict. This leads to the tone of this book which centers around the idea of duty. Some of the characters are more willing to follow up on their obligations than others including their superiors. It remains to be seen whether or not the characters’ choices will have negative consequences for the rest of the galaxy.

            The appeal for Chaos Vector have been positive. Fans of Velocity Weapon will be pleased to know that the author presents a strong and fast-paced sequel to this familial space opera. Science fiction fans and anyone who is interested in an intriguing space opera should read this series, especially with the third and final book in the trilogy—Catalyst Gate—releasing this summer (2021)! If you cannot read the book, then you can listen to the audiobook like I did. Once again, Joe Jameson does an excellent job narrating this story, and I hope he does the next book!

            Chaos Vector is a strong and an entertaining sequel to this underappreciated space opera. Both the characters and the plot develop as answers lead to more questions. Everything Megan E. O’Keefe has written in her story guarantees a promising conclusion to this trilogy! Don’t wait any longer, start reading The Protectorate

My Reading: Enjoy It (4.5 out of 5). 

TV Episode Review: “His Dark Materials”: “The Theft”

The episode opens with the devastation left behind by the Magisterium on the witches, who swear vengeance against them. However, the clans acknowledge that their priority is to search for Lyra Silvertongue before the Great War begins. Unfortunately, they have no idea where she could be. 

            Lee Scoresby continues his search for Lyra—in his world—by searching for Doctor Stanislaus Grumman, in which rumors say that he is in possession of a “weapon” that offers protection. It seems that Scoresby is more of a gunslinger than an aeronaut in this adaptation, yet his conviction for finding Lyra and helping the witches continues to bring out the best in him. His interrogation with Mrs. Coulter is very interesting because viewers gain more understanding of Lee’s character as well as how and why he became an aeronaut (on the TV series anyway). As for Mrs. Coulter, I believe it’s safe to say that she recalls what it’s like to have the Magisterium looking for you. 

            Meanwhile, Lyra decides to return to Will’s (our) world, without him, which leaves Will searching through the World of Specters for her. These scenes are altered so that Lyra appears more careless in Will’s world and disregards Will’s warnings about “people searching for them.” Lyra loses the Alethiometer because she ignores her instincts and does what she shouldn’t do. In the books, Lyra is unaware anyone from her world is familiar with Will’s world. 

            Dr. Malone continues her research on Dark Matter based on what Lyra told her about Dust. In these scenes, viewers learn more about her character, including her lifestyle as a scholar, and what she must do in order to make the breakthrough in her research. And, she’s closer than she realizes.  

            As Will continues to search for Lyra, he meets up with Angelica who continues to warn Will about the Specters. Angelica explains to Will why the Tower is so significant in her world. It seems that scholars are very significant to the plot of this story. The scene at the movie theater is straight from the books. After Will finds Lyra, they go in search of the man who took the Alethiometer. They find the man who stole the Alethiometer, and he offers to trade it for another item, which both Will and Lyra have to retrieve. 

            In all, this episode is more in line with the chapters from The Subtle Knife. The expansion of character development and dialogue demonstrates where all of the characters stand at this point in the mini-series. Readers of the books know what to expect in the next episode, but the viewers are about to learn more about the workings of Dust.

My Rating: 8.5 out of 10